Definition of recital in US English:

recital

noun

  • 1The performance of a program of music by a solo instrumentalist or singer or by a small group.

    ‘a piano recital’
    • ‘Six student recitals featuring Mier's music were held, two on Friday night, and four throughout the day on Saturday.’
    • ‘The first concert for the year, on March 26, features virtuoso pianist Harold Brown, who has travelled the world performing solo recitals and playing with symphony orchestras.’
    • ‘In the first half of the recital he performed music by Buxtehude, Bach and John Ireland.’
    • ‘He performed a solo recital at Benaroya Recital Hall and has appeared with several orchestras.’
    • ‘She also studied composition, theory and harmony with Hugo Kauder, whose music she later performed in her recitals.’
    • ‘I dislike piano recitals, and prefer orchestral and choral music.’
    • ‘The music festival will offer numerous organ, harpsichord and piano recitals by emerging artists as well as internationally renowned soloists.’
    • ‘They gave a video show outlining the history of the company, and the school's music teacher performed a recital.’
    • ‘It is also considered disruptive to clap individual songs or short instrumental pieces rather than at the end of each group at lieder recitals or early music concerts.’
    • ‘They frequently perform duo piano recitals throughout North America.’
    • ‘The unusually gifted child could play the piano at the age of three and at seven played a two-hour solo recital of music by Mozart, Bach, Beethoven and a number of his own compositions.’
    • ‘Since then, she has performed regularly in solo recitals and with orchestras.’
    • ‘A fine pianist and singularly persuasive interpreter of his own music, Head was famous for his one-man recitals of his vocal music.’
    • ‘Dichter has performed in solo recitals and has appeared with virtually all of the world's major orchestras.’
    • ‘Now that the girls do not have exams to work towards, they are going to focus on building up pieces of music for their repertoire to perform at recitals.’
    • ‘At the festival he will perform a solo recital and play the Elgar concerto with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra.’
    • ‘This is the person who will buy tickets to attend symphony concerts, opera, ballet, chamber music recitals, choral concerts and musical theater.’
    • ‘Next Friday it performs a recital of sacred choral music at Christ Church Cathedral, Waterford.’
    • ‘She has given noteworthy piano recitals as soloist and accompanist at Perth, Brunei, Singapore, Malaysia, New Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, and Bangalore.’
    • ‘This recital will feature the music of Aaron Copland, Charles Ives, George Gershwin, Paul Schoenfield, Yehudi Wyner and Arlene Zallman.’
    concert, performance, musical performance, public performance, solo performance, solo, show
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  • 2An enumeration or listing of connected names, facts, or elements.

    ‘a recital of their misfortunes’
    • ‘A very brief recital of the relevant facts will suffice.’
    • ‘He listened through each and every recital of the details.’
    • ‘Their questions are good and they aren't looking for a recital of the details of the platform.’
    • ‘The film is much more than a dry recital of events.’
    • ‘Italian restaurants restricted their list to Italian wines; French restaurant wine lists were a recital of Bordeaux, Burgundy, and Champagne.’
    • ‘One is the children's memorial: a dark, empty space broken only by myriad points of light, like stars, and by a continuous recital of the names of children who perished.’
    • ‘Brown seeks to show, with impressive erudition and illuminating analyses of many works of art, how imagination can be a vehicle of truth that is more profound than bare recitals of historical fact.’
    • ‘A story does not need to be a bland recital of events.’
    • ‘That many people have begun to find a recital of these dangers tiresome is perhaps an even greater threat.’
    • ‘A recital of the story is not really possible with such a wide-ranging and epic film.’
    • ‘This work is not a recital of the principal events connected with Guru Nanak's life nor is it a compendium of his teachings.’
    • ‘Given what most people today think they know about Fascism, this bare recital of facts is a mystery story.’
    enumeration, list, litany, catalogue, listing, detailing, itemizing, specification
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  • 3usually recitalsLaw
    The part of a legal document that explains the purpose of the deed and gives factual information.

    • ‘The following recitals explain the background and underlying policy of the Directive, so far as relevant for present purposes.’
    • ‘The same formula appears in the recital relating to the purpose of the 1880 purchase.’
    • ‘The recitals do not give any indication of the purpose or scope of Art.6.’
    • ‘You might note that the Crown law officer who drafted the lease got the proclamation wrong in the recitals but otherwise the documents are there, your Honours.’
    • ‘One of the problems in that case was the use of recitals in legislation to establish constitutional facts.’
    • ‘As the recitals to the Policy make clear, the appellant by virtue of the Policy is entitled to be a member of the Society.’

Pronunciation

recital

/rəˈsaɪdl//rəˈsīdl/