Definition of receptive in English:

receptive

adjective

  • 1Willing to consider or accept new suggestions and ideas.

    ‘a receptive audience’
    ‘the institution was receptive to new ideas’
    • ‘Their motivation for the series is to expand its audience among the theater-going public, which is not always receptive to new ideas.’
    • ‘He attempts to settle his mother into the nursing home, but finds that her old friends aren't quite so receptive to the idea.’
    • ‘They must be open and receptive to the ideas of others.’
    • ‘We have sought to respond to their concerns and have been receptive to new ideas and theories put forward by them.’
    • ‘To his credit, he has had an excellent rapport with the selectors, who find him quite receptive to ideas and suggestions from various quarters.’
    • ‘His ideas found a receptive audience in literate circles from Lisbon to Moscow, and they supply a convenient starting place for an examination of European political systems.’
    • ‘She says people are very receptive to this idea.’
    • ‘You have to show yourselves as people with open minds, receptive to the ideas of independent voices in the boardroom.’
    • ‘If other group members appraise him as a creative type, they are likely to be a receptive audience for his ideas, and he should fit into the group harmoniously.’
    • ‘They were both extremely interested and receptive to my ideas.’
    • ‘I think it helps them become better musicians because they are more receptive to different musical ideas.’
    • ‘Even those who were most receptive to foreign ideas adapted them in line with traditional Russian concerns, interests and attitudes.’
    • ‘Sometimes, even if you think you're being totally reasonable, your mom may not be receptive to your suggestions.’
    • ‘Our President, it is said, simply wasn't receptive to this idea.’
    • ‘But were foresters, or for that matter loggers, receptive to this idea?’
    • ‘Unfortunately not many of them were receptive to the idea.’
    • ‘You are receptive to new ideas and intuitive in relationships.’
    • ‘So far the government has proved receptive to the idea.’
    • ‘People are open and receptive to timely suggestions on what to drink.’
    • ‘Some ministers are known to be receptive to the idea of tolls, provided they are only applied to new roads.’
    open-minded, ready to consider new ideas, willing to consider new ideas, open to new ideas, open to suggestions, open, responsive, amenable, sympathetic, well disposed, interested, attuned, flexible, willing, favourable, approachable, accessible, friendly, welcoming
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Able or willing to receive something, especially signals or stimuli.
      • ‘Infants may seem to be sleeping most of the time, but they're far more intelligent and receptive than most adults imagine.’
      • ‘Considerable flowering asynchrony among fig trees in any population increases the likelihood that a fig wasp emerging at any time of year will be able to locate a receptive fig.’
      • ‘Clearly the recent rains had left their mark as fairways were still wet and greens very receptive and the scores were good, though not brilliant.’
      • ‘Exfoliation removes dead skin cells, embedded dirt and toxins, and stimulates the skin, making it receptive to the nutrient-rich facial mask that should follow.’
      • ‘Sensory isolation creates an alert and receptive state of mind, so floatation works well combined with hypnotherapy to treat smoking and weight problems’
    2. 1.2 (of a female animal) ready to mate.
      • ‘When a receptive female comes along, however, it's every bull for himself.’
      • ‘Although the mice mated normally with receptive female mice, the females did not become pregnant.’
      • ‘During the breeding season, male foxes may closely follow sexually receptive females for several days, although this is not always the case.’
      • ‘We watched both receptive and unreceptive females.’
      • ‘When searching for receptive females, males patrol around the habitat and stop to drum on the dry uppermost leaves on the ground.’
      • ‘Thus, downwind males could be located higher in the vegetation to increase their chances of intercepting a pheromone plume and locating a receptive female.’
      • ‘While grooming, the male flying fox keeps his genitals exposed, indicating to nearby females that he is receptive to mating.’
      • ‘Adult females become receptive to male advances only in years when they have stored enough body fat to bear a litter.’
      • ‘Estrus is the period when the female is sexually receptive and breeding can occur.’
      • ‘In most mammals the female is only receptive to sex at certain times (when she is most likely to get pregnant).’
      • ‘In females, estrogens and progestins activate female receptive behaviors and parental care.’
      • ‘Male African lions perform this maneuver when they consort with a receptive female, herding her in the desired direction.’
      • ‘On the afternoon of estrus, the resident male appeared to actively defend the receptive female on his territory.’
      • ‘By blocking or scrambling messages from females, he may be keeping competing males from realizing that a receptive female is nearby.’
      • ‘In a variety of mammals, females must adopt a receptive posture for sexual intercourse to occur.’
      • ‘During the mating season, males drum while wandering around the habitat searching for receptive females, which are more stationary than are males.’
      • ‘If females were unable to convey this important mating and location information, males would not know which females were receptive or where to find them.’
      • ‘The mating ritual begins when the male visits receptive females.’
      • ‘A receptive female responds by swimming in a tight circle, exposing her abdomen and facilitating insemination.’
      • ‘In the study, male meadow voles were paired with sexually receptive females in two cages.’

Pronunciation

receptive

/rəˈsɛptɪv//rəˈseptiv/