Definition of recalcitrance in US English:

recalcitrance

noun

  • See recalcitrant

    • ‘For some reason, this lawless recalcitrance was rewarded by the provincial government in 1993, when the residents were given 99-year leases on their property for about a dollar a day.’
    • ‘But in order to become a part of medical history, parahuman reproduction and human genetic engineering must circumvent the recalcitrance of an antiquated culture.’
    • ‘Indeed, one of the prices of a victory won in the face of French and German recalcitrance has been a slide in UK support for the single currency.’
    • ‘It is permissible to cast this as popular ignorance but more accurate to name it recalcitrance, the hardheaded preference of some colonists for their own common version of what was lawful.’
    • ‘The moodiness, mischieviousness and mulish recalcitrance we see in all our favorite appliances comprise much of what it means to be a human born after AD 1400.’

Pronunciation

recalcitrance

/rəˈkælsətrəns//rəˈkalsətrəns/