Definition of rebellion in US English:

rebellion

noun

  • 1An act of violent or open resistance to an established government or ruler.

    ‘the authorities put down a rebellion by landless colonials’
    ‘Simon de Montfort rose in rebellion’
    • ‘Despite a record-breaking series of rebellions in the last Parliament, they never inflicted a single significant defeat.’
    • ‘He visited the far-flung corners of his empire, bucking up his troops but also stamping out incipient rebellions.’
    • ‘There was indeed a subjective factor: a national consciousness expressed in several armed rebellions in defence of the Fueros.’
    • ‘The result was a series of rebellions in schools that opted to forbid the practice, leading to the expulsion of some girls.’
    • ‘These days, however, governments have to pay more deference to the organisers of grassroots rebellions.’
    • ‘There has been an enormous rise in workers' strikes, peasant rebellions and urban riots.’
    • ‘If you look at the scale of some of the rebellions in the last Parliament, the government would have been defeated had its majority been below 80.’
    • ‘Colombia has also had constant rebellions and civil unrest for the last fifty years.’
    • ‘She also said her top priority was to prevent the diverse archipelago being torn apart by separatist rebellions.’
    • ‘Now he is his own man, hardened and scarred by backbench rebellions, geopolitical scraps and a hostile media firing on him from both left and right.’
    • ‘He also wished to prevent the restoration of France's colonial empire and the rebellions he expected would follow if it was restored.’
    • ‘Add in the new rebels from last week's rebellions, and in the last six months alone you are up to 62 Labour MPs who have already defied their whips.’
    • ‘There had been countless rebellions and revolts during the second half of the 1790s.’
    • ‘For now, there hasn't been any report on any uprisings or rebellions.’
    • ‘These are small rebellions, perhaps, but encouraging nonetheless.’
    • ‘You note the number of parliamentary rebellions.’
    • ‘It was filled with murderous conquests, hate, rebellions, and revolutions.’
    • ‘Otherwise, you're going to get one of the great historic rebellions among working Americans.’
    • ‘Surviving monuments in Glasgow and Edinburgh to crushed colonial rebellions show a pride in the Scots' own brutal contribution to colonial rule.’
    • ‘Hoyle's rebellions were revolts of the commons, taken over and defused by the gentry and nobility.’
    uprising, revolt, insurrection, mutiny, revolution, insurgence, insurgency, rising, rioting, riot
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The action or process of resisting authority, control, or convention.
      ‘an act of teenage rebellion’
      • ‘For a few seconds, sneaking into the bar wearing dirty jeans and flip-flops seemed like an act of rebellion.’
      • ‘When this is a choice made against knowledge it becomes a serious act of rebellion.’
      • ‘Even the engagement was an act of fierce rebellion and shunning of anachronistic traditions.’
      • ‘For example, any questioning of authority is treated as rebellion, and not trusting.’
      • ‘For these dogs, there is no such thing as betrayal or rebellion, only loyalty.’
      • ‘In a fit of teenage rebellion, I had told God to get out of my life and leave me alone.’
      • ‘Early in his life, he had converted to Catholicism, as a kind of teenage act of rebellion.’
      • ‘So as an act of pitiful rebellion against the fact that I even have to be at work, I'm refusing to turn the office lights on.’
      • ‘This is now past teenage rebellion where you thought your mother was the worst person in the world.’
      • ‘Kelly seems to have conceived what became his last stand as an act of mutinous rebellion and mass murder.’
      • ‘Perhaps we should turn to other forms of rebellion, such as rock 'n' roll.’
      • ‘But they are also more able to channel their feelings into acts of rebellion.’
      • ‘To suggest that teenage rebellion is a modern phenomenon is just plain wrong, Ruth says.’
      • ‘It shows the reasons for what would seem at first sight to be mindless vandalism, but are in fact little acts of rebellion.’
      • ‘The following films deal with rebellion against arbitrary or repressive authority.’
      • ‘So instead, I am planning to stage my own little acts of social rebellion throughout the day.’
      • ‘All good teenage rebellion rejects rational thought but needs an excuse for that rage.’
      • ‘It was an act of rebellion against the rigid strictures of both the contemporary social mores and the strict code of ballet.’
      • ‘The characters that fitted it best were outsiders, in rebellion against authority or their families.’
      • ‘After all, let's not pretend that all worthwhile pop music has always been about generational rebellion.’
      defiance, disobedience, rebelliousness, insubordination, mutinousness, subversion, subversiveness, resistance, dissent, nonconformity
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from Latin rebellio(n-), from rebellis (see rebel).

Pronunciation

rebellion

/rəˈbelyən//rəˈbɛljən/