Main definitions of rear in English

: rear1rear2

rear1

noun

  • 1[in singular] The back part of something, especially a building or vehicle.

    ‘the kitchen door at the rear of the house’
    • ‘The fuselage is tubular and cigar-shaped tapering to the rear with a rounded, glassed-in nose and bubble canopy.’
    • ‘The protesters even attempted to approach the building from the rear, and called on TV channels to broadcast the action.’
    • ‘A two-storey mews at the rear of the building fronts onto Laverty Court providing access to the car park.’
    • ‘Even though no roads are in the way in the rear of the building, it's just as effectively sealed off from its surroundings as if it were surrounded by a moat.’
    • ‘For this reason, the last vehicle in the convoy should always be one with armed troops facing the rear.’
    • ‘Stromness Fire Brigade were called out and extinguished the fire, which caused minor damage to the doors at the rear of the building.’
    • ‘What made you decide to move from the front part of the building to the rear?’
    • ‘One of the buildings at the rear of the main house dates from that time.’
    • ‘The impact caused a fire in the rear of the vehicle which then spread inside and raged through the entire bus, leaving nothing but a blackened skeleton.’
    • ‘The overall exterior design is characterized by straight lines and a raised rear.’
    • ‘Scorch damage was caused to the rear of the vehicle.’
    • ‘However, by using the right analog stick, you can train the camera on both sides and the rear of your vehicle.’
    • ‘The meeting will be held in Rathkeeland House in the U3A office, which is to the rear of the building.’
    • ‘There was a terrific crash as it ‘bounced’ on the front and another as the rear fell into the river.’
    • ‘As I landed the aircraft, I sensed a pronounced increase in the overall vibration level coming from the rear of the aircraft.’
    • ‘These transducers are usually mounted on a beam that is attached to either the front or the rear of the host vehicle.’
    • ‘The missile has four rectangular fins for aerodynamic control at the rear, and four wings at just over halfway from nose to tail on the length of the body.’
    • ‘Staff vehicles enter at the rear of the building by means of a ramp that leads down to a subterranean car park.’
    • ‘While the front of the building floats, the rear is rooted in the brick and stone structure that houses the kitchen, toilets and study rooms.’
    • ‘He and two volunteers settle into the carpeted rear of the vehicle, walkie-talkies in hand, and peer out the windows.’
    back, back part, hind part, back end, other end
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The space or position at the back of something or someone.
      ‘the field at the rear of the church’
      • ‘There is a lawn and paved patio area to the rear of the conservatory.’
      • ‘They moved into the churchyard to get out of the light and he led her around to a paved area at the rear of the church.’
      • ‘The exterior contains a spacious garden to the rear with a patio area and a boiler house.’
      • ‘There is off-street parking and a paved patio area to the rear, and the gardens are planted with lawns and rose bushes.’
      • ‘A sculpture terrace in the rear completes the exhibition space.’
      • ‘There is off-street parking for residents in a private car parking area to the rear of the development.’
      • ‘Number 137 is held on a 235-year lease dating from 1934 and there are four car parking spaces to the rear.’
      • ‘There are front and rear gardens and a paved patio area to the rear.’
      • ‘With that he had walked over to the side of the court yard just to the rear of the firing squad.’
      • ‘The ground falls away at the rear of the property.’
      • ‘Land which was previously an area of open space at the rear of homes in Thresher Rise and Queenborough Lane in Great Notley, is set to be used to provide up to seven allotments.’
      • ‘Behind their bay windows are elegant drawing rooms and to the rear there is sufficient space to create generous kitchens and living areas.’
      • ‘He said that a new application was received by City of York Council yesterday to transform a derelict car park at the rear of the property to shopping space.’
      • ‘The college argues that the playing field, at the rear of the site, has not been used for recreational or sporting use by either the college or any other organisation for years.’
      • ‘Much of what I recall was once a large playground and green area to the rear of the site is now home to a small village of prefab classrooms.’
      • ‘In total the scheme provides 160 square metres of retail floorspace and 14 car parking spaces at the rear of the apartments.’
      • ‘To mitigate risk to the tank, the infantry would move to the tank's flank to prevent the enemy from mounting from the rear.’
      • ‘Several vehicles were lined up along the rear of the small parking lot, out of direct sight of the road.’
      • ‘Another feature of the bus, with a maximum speed of 40 kmph, is that it has sensors that tell the driver of vehicles approaching from the rear.’
      • ‘The front of the house includes a lawn and a drive with space to park two cars; to the rear is a patio garden with shrubs, plants and a block-built shed.’
      end, tail end, rear end, back end, tail
      back, back part, hind part, back end, other end
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 The hindmost part of an army, fleet, or line of people.
      ‘two blue policemen at the rear fell out of the formation’
      • ‘Major General John Gregg covered the right and rear of the Army of the Potomac.’
      • ‘He recalled how York had picked off the soldiers to the rear, so that the lead soldiers didn't recognise the severity of the threat their enemy posed.’
      • ‘The execution of special operations in the enemy rear also falls within their ambit.’
      • ‘He didn't direct his regiment from a safer place to the rear.’
      • ‘Ships to the rear of the line, unaware of the speed reduction, closed up in an irregular formation.’
      • ‘On the battlefields we face, there are no front lines and no rear areas; there are no secure garrisons or convoys.’
      • ‘A tremendous explosion thundered from the rear of the formation.’
      • ‘Running away from the body and back to the battle, Henry takes up with the procession of wounded men trudging to the army's rear for care.’
      • ‘His brigade protected the rear of Sherman's army during the Atlanta Campaign, and was part of the Tennessee Campaign at the end of 1864.’
      • ‘Frontal thrusts will be combined with an active front in the enemy rear created by landed groups.’
      • ‘German planners knew that Antwerp must be taken to safeguard the right rear of their armies swinging down into France, and initially allocated five reserve corps to the task.’
      • ‘A gap opened up between the Allied armies as Clark moved away from the decisive point - closing the rear of the German Army.’
      • ‘After fighting for another 30 hours with the wound, he finally went to the rear, where he was treated for internal injuries.’
      • ‘We were stunned when a messenger Jeep drove me to the rear to hear the cease-fire order read aloud.’
      • ‘Either transfer all of your files on a laptop or download them on disks; if you do not, you will be having someone from the rear send the files anyway.’
      • ‘From his position behind the front lines, he could see a stream of wounded men moving in a line to the rear.’
      • ‘Hundreds of trucks are aimlessly hanging around the army rear.’
      • ‘The way to the rear of the Army of Northern Virginia was open.’
      • ‘He often made all-night runs to the rear for parts and tires.’
      • ‘Coordination must be made with the brigade reconnaissance team, companies to the rear, and adjacent units.’
      end, tail end, rear end, back end, tail
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3informal A person's buttocks.
      • ‘If developers rampantly fail to produce good software, but the company exceeds earnings estimates anyway, how many of those rears will be actually on the line?’
      • ‘These athletes have such great-looking rears because their sport effectively targets the gluteal muscles.’
      • ‘Good thing we'll burn it all off by sitting on our rears for another three days.’
      • ‘Be sure to quickly bring your heels up to your rear in a tight tuck.’
      • ‘We're not getting off our rears and just walking places.’
      • ‘Then, one after the other, they hit the same tiny protrusion which caused their rears to topple over their fronts.’
      • ‘Pull one of your feet up to your rear, and turn the foot outwards away from the body.’
      • ‘Now Macy's in New York is endorsing big bottoms by adding an extra 2.5in to their dummies' rears.’
      • ‘If our folks sit on their rears, the Republicans are better organized in Pennsylvania than they've ever been.’
      • ‘I could imagine what it would be like to have that dog bolling his way down the mall hallway, sniffing people's rears and grabbing bags out of unsuspecting hands.’
      buttocks, backside, behind, rear end, rump, seat, haunches, hindquarters, cheeks
      View synonyms

adjective

  • [attributive] At the back.

    ‘the car's rear window’
    • ‘He stood there for a while and watched me pour what remained of my bucket of water over the rear window, and jump to one side so it would not hit my feet.’
    • ‘The proximity of the two tanks also demanded a quick release and clearance before the rear motor compartment of the lead tank sustained damage.’
    • ‘Double doors lead to the rear garden, ensuring that this area is light-filled.’
    • ‘There is a lined and padded soft roof that now has a heated, scratch-proof rear glass window.’
    • ‘One round went through my already shattered rear window; another whistled past my head.’
    • ‘Side running boards are still available while a new rear bumper has been added.’
    • ‘The rear garden has a southerly aspect and is not overlooked from the back.’
    • ‘The damaged floodlights are several feet high and are made of toughened glass similar to that used in the rear window of a car.’
    • ‘As they drove away, Coen looked back once in the rear view mirror.’
    • ‘The back end was completely crumpled and the rear window was shattered.’
    • ‘If your weight is too far back, your rear wheel will bog down.’
    • ‘Its two back seat occupants clambered out through the car's shattered rear window and ran off.’
    • ‘As the trailer rises, the weight gets transferred to the rear axles.’
    • ‘Help speed up the de-icing process by switching on the engine and the rear window heater, but never leave your car running unattended, it's an invitation to thieves.’
    • ‘She checks her rear view mirrors, but she does not check the door.’
    • ‘I live smack between two bridges, and I see them both from my rear windows - I can see them now.’
    • ‘Dad stopped on the highway, I got out, and he sped away with Mom and my five younger brothers and sisters staring out the rear window.’
    • ‘The remix sounds much better than expected, though rear speakers were not utilized much.’
    • ‘Officers believe a spade was used to force a rear window.’
    • ‘The car's striking, swept-back rear window pillars also contribute to its more muscular appearance.’
    • ‘Several shots rang out and police commandos stormed the bus through the rear window.’
    back, end, rearmost, endmost
    hind, hinder, hindmost
    posterior, caudal
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • bring up the rear

    • 1Be at the very end of a line of people.

      • ‘Seán was the first to alight from the car, then came Catriona and I brought up the rear.’
      • ‘A line of dusty, panting dogs, yellow and black, brought up the rear.’
      • ‘A lone, central defenseman protects the front of the net for his goalie and brings up the rear on the offensive attack.’
      • ‘One ranger led the tour, and another brought up the rear to catch stragglers.’
      • ‘The army's central brass band brought up the rear.’
      • ‘Now the Chief Minister goes about escorted by local police personnel, with specially trained security personnel bringing up the rear.’
      • ‘As representatives from practically every regimental association in the city walked behind the gun carriage, the newspaper vendors, many of them disabled ex-servicemen, brought up the rear.’
      • ‘The cops cleared the streets in front and brought up the rear, but along the whole enormous length of the demo there wasn't a cop in sight (other than the usual vanloads down side streets).’
      • ‘I brought up the rear as the cloaked man in front of me made his way towards them.’
      • ‘Two dozen English huntsmen brought up the rear.’
      1. 1.1Come last in a race or other contest.
        • ‘India came 2nd, Korea 3rd, while the young Malaysian team, which lost 6 of their 7 matches, brought up the rear.’
        • ‘Latvia, Hungary and Estonia brought up the rear of Mercer's survey, which covered 24 countries.’
        • ‘By 1982 then, these were the two superpowers, France always in the reckoning, poor old Ireland bringing up the rear with the Scots.’
        • ‘Solis said he felt confident in his mount, in spite of bringing up the rear through much of the race.’
        • ‘England and France are out ahead, Ireland a good third, with the still fledgling Italians bringing up the rear.’
        • ‘It's well-known that, in the status race, mothers bring up the rear, ranking equally with the disabled and the elderly.’
        • ‘The Defence Minister was gunning for third and the Sports Minister brought up the rear.’
        • ‘Dean has slipped to 9%, with the Connecticut senator and the Ohio congressman bringing up the rear.’
        • ‘Greater Manchester had the second worst record among all British city areas in 2000-01, with London bringing up the rear.’
        • ‘Montreal again brought up the rear, this time at $34.2 million.’

Origin

Middle English (first used as a military term): from Old French rere, based on Latin retro back.

Pronunciation:

rear

/rir/

Main definitions of rear in English

: rear1rear2

rear2

verb

  • 1usually be reared[with object] Bring up and care for (a child) until they are fully grown, especially in a particular manner or place.

    ‘he was born and reared in New York City’
    ‘a generation reared on video’
    • ‘There, they reared four children, Tommy, Shelley, Terry and Angela.’
    • ‘Although I feel very passionately with her that rearing children is itself a job.’
    • ‘Do those parents try to rear their child to be as like them as possible, as indistinguishable as possible from its hearing peers?’
    • ‘Applications are welcome from families in the parish who have reared their own children and now may have more free time on their hands.’
    • ‘She felt her baby had a better chance with new parents better equipped to rear her child.’
    • ‘More women are returning to work, particularly those who have reared their children and who now find they are in demand in the workplace.’
    • ‘The movie placed a great emphasis on the role of women in America, suggesting that women's roles are not only getting married and rearing children, but women can do anything they want.’
    • ‘In the meantime, there is a clause in the will that allows the trustees to allocate money from the fund to the guardians for any financial requirements that may arise from rearing the children.’
    • ‘She has her memories, she reared her children here and it is where she is most content.’
    • ‘Jackson used the exercise to demonstrate the challenges parents face in rearing children.’
    • ‘In the end, she believes that how parents rear a child will have a stronger effect than what they read.’
    • ‘What lawyers call the doctrine of parental authority grants parents wide latitude to rear their children as they choose.’
    • ‘Marriage is the basis of the family, and it is in healthy families that children are reared to be honorable people and good citizens.’
    • ‘This means that the original enslaver was not concerned with the ‘cost of production’ - the cost of rearing a child until it was old enough to be sold into the trade.’
    • ‘I really want to tell parents about what I think they should look for in rearing their children.’
    • ‘But the Supreme Court ruling does put a high value on the contribution a wife makes to rearing the children and supporting her husband as he builds his career and wealth.’
    • ‘Affectionate though he admittedly may be, he is thinking more about rearing the children than about impressing them.’
    • ‘Among the many health problems facing families rearing children in low income countries are two common conditions - postnatal depression and infant failure to thrive.’
    • ‘He and his wife Eileen have reared six children and his three sons have all worn the Ellistown jersey with distinction.’
    • ‘One school of thought is that it's designed to last long enough for a couple to rear children to the point where they are relatively self-sufficient.’
    bring up, care for, look after, nurture, parent
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of an animal) care for (its young) until they are fully grown.
      • ‘Since making their home at Bassenthwaite in 2001, the first ospreys to do so for 150 years, the ospreys have successfully reared four young.’
      • ‘It likes the stables and barns to nest in and rear its young.’
      • ‘Pembroke river is described as a refuge for wildlife. Thousands of birds feed on the mud flats during the winter and in the summer shell duck nest and rear their young here.’
      • ‘Millions of people have followed the private lives of the Lakes osprey and watched as the five young have been successfully reared in the nest over the last four years.’
      • ‘Each year, the number of breeding pairs and successfully reared young will be compared to previous years' numbers.’
      • ‘There is no support for the idea that female larks work harder during the chick rearing period compared with the incubation period.’
      • ‘The hen's efforts to carry on the task of rearing her young in such circumstances were in vain and they all died.’
      • ‘In socially monogamous species, extrapair males usually do not assist females rearing the young or provide other direct benefits to the female.’
      • ‘Other studies even showed that nestlings fed by people were less afraid of new things until age 6 months than were birds reared by their parents.’
      • ‘This study was conducted during the chick rearing period of both species.’
      • ‘Each year, just before spring, flocks of fig birds descend on Grafton to build their nests & rear their young.’
      • ‘Animals that rear their young might educate their young in survival abilities.’
      • ‘Calendar buyers will learn that it is the third time in 150 years that wild osprey have nested and reared young at Bassenthwaite Lake.’
      • ‘Modern farming practices that involve growing trees and rearing animals and other forms of agricultural practices at the same time should be encouraged.’
      • ‘August may be high summer for us, but for wasps the year is already in decline; it is when they switch from food high in protein, necessary for rearing their young, to sugary foods.’
      • ‘The real giveaway is the female's hidden pouch, albeit backward opening, for rearing its young.’
      • ‘They rear their young in stick nests or ‘dreys’, are less active in winter, and do not hibernate or bury nuts as winter store.’
      • ‘Some tropical bird species rear their young near wasp nests and depend on the insects to repel predators.’
      • ‘For the third year running a mistle thrush has chosen an amber traffic light in Salford to rear her young.’
      • ‘‘He wasn't reared by the dogs as such, he lived with them in a cave,’ she said.’
    2. 1.2 Breed and raise (animals)
      ‘the calves are reared for beef’
      • ‘Hugh describes growing vegetables and rearing animals, as well as cooking them, in an unpretentious manner.’
      • ‘In the southern Karas region, which is cattle rearing area, Kangowa said grazing will be so poor that the government is encouraging farmers to sell their livestock.’
      • ‘The firm rears chickens from just days old and processes them through to cooked finished products.’
      • ‘As it is sometimes difficult to rear young calves it is a good thing to keep them clean and dry., whitewashing the calf hulls two or three times during the winter.’
      • ‘The cubs are reared until they are about six months old and then slaughtered.’
      • ‘These larvae were reared separately until eclosion and both classes were viable.’
      • ‘Her business is now concentrated at Orielton Mill, Hundleton, where she plans to rear young trout to sell on to other fish farmers.’
      • ‘Firstly, most pork is produced from pigs reared indoors and some would have been frozen.’
      • ‘Calf rearing systems must aim to produce rapid growth rates matched by proper rumen development.’
      • ‘But in 1996, a Swiss animal behaviourist noticed that mice and rats reared this way might actually be decidedly abnormal.’
      • ‘A good, well-organised calf rearing system should be a priority for any dairy farmer, and this does not mean that you go and put up an expensive calf house.’
      • ‘Young fish were also reared in hatchery tanks and released as smolts, the stage at which salmon head to sea before traveling to northerly feeding grounds.’
      • ‘A high percentage of Welsh turkey producers are concentrated in Pembrokeshire - a county recognised nationally as an important poultry rearing region.’
      • ‘The sheep penned were good specimens of the best breeds, and the standard was of a high order and enhanced the reputation of this part of the Cotswold Hills as a sheep rearing country.’
      • ‘Cattle rearing remains part of prairie Cajun life today, but the spread of agriculture, especially rice, has reduced both its economic importance and much of its flamboyant ways.’
      • ‘The scientists from the University of California at San Francisco reared young rats in an environment of moderate continuous noise.’
      • ‘By May, weighing-in at around 40 lb, the lamb rearing cycle comes to an end.’
      • ‘Fish farms were established during Roman times when they built ‘vivaria’, areas where spawn and young fish were reared for the table.’
      • ‘It could be streptococcus suis, a bacteria endemic in most pig rearing nations.’
      • ‘If you are really concerned about animal cruelty then take a look at our abattoir system or investigate battery chicken farms or focus on the intensive cattle/pig rearing methods employed in some parts of Europe.’
      breed, raise, keep, tend
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Grow or cultivate (plants)
      [as adjective, in combination] ‘laboratory-reared plantlets’
      • ‘Stocks of all three species were reared on banana medium at 18°.’
      • ‘Customers are given necessary advice on how to rear the plant, Mr Joseph says.’
      • ‘My freedom to roam at will conflicts with the farmer's need to make a living and to rear the crops and livestock we all need to exist.’
      • ‘The seeds were the progeny of plants reared in a common greenhouse environment from the original seed collections, thus minimizing any possible maternal effects.’
      grow, cultivate
      View synonyms
  • 2[no object] (of a horse or other animal) raise itself upright on its hind legs.

    ‘the horse reared in terror’
    ‘a rattlesnake reared up at his elbow’
    • ‘The colt reared and began galloping when other horses breezed past him.’
    • ‘The shield snapped up and cracked the horse sharply across the hocks and the animal brayed and reared, striking the horse beside it.’
    • ‘The bear reared on its hind legs and tried to swipe its paw down towards Theresa.’
    • ‘She pulled back hard on the reins, and the horse reared back on its hind legs.’
    • ‘Renwick climbed aboard a young horse in the yard at home last week and was horribly squashed underneath his mount when it reared over backwards.’
    • ‘My stallion reared and whinnied, causing Desiree to hold on for dear life.’
    • ‘Shep rears and begins racing in the other direction, taking Tess with him.’
    • ‘When a horse rears as you are walking beside it, you want to stay as close to the shoulder as possible.’
    • ‘Melhiril's horse reared back on its hind legs, letting out a loud whinny.’
    • ‘The creature reared back in pain, then collapsed.’
    • ‘The horses became frightened and reared, unseating the riders.’
    • ‘Very spooked, the horse reared on its hind legs and flew out of the stables.’
    • ‘The horses pranced and reared in anxious impatience.’
    • ‘The black horse reared a bit, but somehow, Mel managed to flawlessly knock off the knight.’
    • ‘The report concludes that current husbandry systems cause serious problems for all species of animals reared for fur.’
    • ‘The girl's horse reared and whinnied, whites showing in his eye.’
    • ‘His mount rears in protest as he forces it to a halt, and turning in his saddle, he sees Balen kneeling in the snow, soaked and pale, covered in blood, looking smaller than he's ever seen him before.’
    • ‘Some horses that rear will only lift their front feet off the ground a short distance and only do it at certain times when they are overexcited or keen to move forward.’
    • ‘Horses rear in terror as the young Countess enters St Germain's palace and screams as she seems to be swallowed into an abyss of darkness.’
    • ‘Unused to such harsh treatment, the horse reared back on its hind legs, unseating Jack Foster who landed with a thud on his backside.’
    • ‘I gripped the reins so hard that my mare reared on its hind legs and nearly threw me off.’
    • ‘There is a loud whinny as the horse rears to a stop, and a loud pounding is soon heard on the door.’
    1. 2.1[with adverbial of place] (of a building, mountain, etc.) extend or appear to extend to a great height.
      ‘houses reared up on either side’
      • ‘Beyond the yawning valley reared a jagged skyline dominated by the massive peaks of Tirich Mir and Buni Zom.’
      • ‘The jagged Caucasus reared above these lush hills and even before Mestia it was clear that Svaneti's fabled splendour was no exaggeration.’
      • ‘Above us a wall of broken black rock rears steeply.’
      • ‘Far below, beneath shreds of glistening cloud, York is laid out like a map: the Ouse glinting in the sun, the Minster rearing above the clutter of buildings around its feet.’
      • ‘The mountains now rear before us like terrestrial tsunamis - snow-peaked surf in five-thousand metre sets.’
      • ‘Behind it rear an assortment of rolling hills and mountains, dominated by Ben Lui.’
      • ‘The forest thinned as branches parted; a few hamlets dotted grassy slopes below and thickly-wooded hills reared above.’
      • ‘The car pulled up the organization's main building; the old Irish castle seemed to rear like a rock out of the flat earth.’
      • ‘Beyond it, the Cumbrian mountains rear, an impenetrable barrier.’
      • ‘Lahore station rears out of the surrounding anarchy like a liner out of the ocean.’
      • ‘A metallic roar cuts through the stillness, and out of the murk further up the valley a gigantic shape rears, an uprooted sapling clutched in its metal talons.’
      • ‘They are shaped like Mayan temples and they rear above the light and smog with the astonishing bulk of Ayers Rock in the desert.’
      rise, rise up, tower, soar, loom
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2rear up (of a person) show anger or irritation; go on the attack.
      ‘the press reared up in the wake of the bombings’
      • ‘The civil police were able only to quell the uproar in their immediate proximity, which only reared up again when they departed.’
      • ‘The campaign did what any front-running effort does when the Hitler issue rears up.’
      • ‘Fratricidal violence, entirely suppressed in the Blackpool Winter Gardens, rears up in an angry spat at breakfast time in the Imperial hotel.’
      • ‘A small flare of obstinate anger reared up in her.’
      • ‘Any time a major issue reared up, I could foretell with pinpoint accuracy what The Nation would have to say about it.’
      • ‘Fears that a massive waste facility will be built at Rivenhall airfield have reared up again.’
      • ‘Someone should slap me but I think it's minor retribution for her unnecessarily autocratic, bossy tendencies that once again reared up yesterday.’
      • ‘The concerned but disenfranchised, on the other hand, have little choice but to keep up the adversarialism that reared up at the meeting in Seattle.’
      • ‘Yet homophobia rears up in the film's climax, when Phranc receives a devastating snub at Tupperware's annual convention.’
      • ‘And what discussion of the down side of Blogs could be complete without mention of the wonderful sophomoric Blogfights that rear up now and then?’
    3. 2.3archaic [with object] Set (something) upright.

Phrases

  • rear one's head

    • 1Raise one's head.

      • ‘I made another drop just edging the rocky shallows and reared my head up to see - in disbelief, really - the feathering wall in front of me bending backward just twenty yards in front.’
      • ‘From the glowing molten hole, the creature reared its hideous head.’
      • ‘Without even rearing his head back he shot it forward in an attempt to eat them in one bite.’
      • ‘Shawn reared his head back, and let a scream escape his throat.’
      • ‘The seven-foot Cobra curled on the ground slowly rears his head and stares at the Marines encircling him.’
      • ‘Alex shouted and the creature reared its ugly head.’
      • ‘With courage I slowly reared my head to look at the clock.’
      • ‘But just when I think so, yet another Craig Wilson rears his head.’
      • ‘Just when I'm least expecting it, she rears her head.’
      • ‘Smiling a toothy grin, he put his hands to his temples, his index fingers extended, and reared his head.’
      raise, hold up, uplift, upraise
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of an unpleasant matter) emerge; present itself.
        ‘elitism is rearing its ugly head again’
        • ‘Just as the garden weeds are more robust than the desired plants, bad information rears its ugly head more virulently than good information.’
        • ‘It was as though she had two personalities, and when the beast reared its ugly head, it meant a very, very long night.’
        • ‘Tree poisoning has again reared its ugly head on the peninsula, with a row of trees in Terry St Balmain repeatedly vandalised.’
        • ‘And now, another base-line issue rears its head.’
        • ‘It seemed the realization I had made at a young age was finally rearing its ugly head in their minds.’
        • ‘It certainly reared its head in the past and it rears its head in the present time as well.’
        • ‘‘If the disease rears its head again, we need to have the information at our fingertips to thrust it back again,’ Dr Salter said.’
        • ‘But controversy reared its ugly head again ahead of the 2004 turf season.’
        • ‘This matter has just reared its head in the election campaign.’
        • ‘In the fields, where once the young children played, to the right of Mountain View, another rubbish dump has reared its ugly head.’

Origin

Old English rǣran set upright, construct, elevate of Germanic origin; related to raise (which has supplanted rear in many applications), also to rise.

Pronunciation:

rear

/rir/