Definition of re-enactment in US English:

re-enactment

noun

  • 1The acting out of a past event.

    ‘the re-enactment of a naval battle’
    count noun ‘a replica gun for use in historical re-enactments’
    • ‘The show picks a topic and presents it through re-enactments and first-hand accounts.’
    • ‘The communist regime considers stylized reenactment of ancient stories to be a politically subversive intellectual entertainment for the rich.’
    • ‘Most rituals performed by Maya kings were commemorative reenactments.’
    • ‘The end is a carefully staged reenactment of the finale of the film.’
    • ‘Writing is frequently a form of reenactment.’
    • ‘He participates in historical re-enactments of battles from the 1800's.’
    • ‘He bets the other two boys that the South will win during a Civil War reenactment.’
    • ‘The image featured a bare-breasted woman as part of a reenactment of the Last Supper.’
    • ‘Even TV shows are showing real life crime cases in lieu of dramatic reenactments.’
    • ‘Toys such as fire trucks, ambulances, building blocks, puppets and dolls encourage play reenactment of children's experiences and observations.’
  • 2The action of bringing a law into effect again.

    ‘there was a wholesale repeal and re-enactment of the law’
    • ‘This statute was merely a reenactment of prior statutes which have preserved common law crimes and made them part of our jurisprudence.’
    • ‘They were referred to the committee on the expiration and reenactment of laws, and never heard from again.’
    • ‘The secretary general said that the re-enactment of the 2000 decree could affect the fate of the 40 million jobless in the country.’
    • ‘The refugee support organisation described the draft law as resembling "in many respects a re-enactment of old-fashioned laws for protection against foreigners".’
    • ‘In some countries some Muslims are clamoring for reenactment of fundamentalist Islamic measures.’
    • ‘The Law of Social Risk of 1970 was a reenactment of the old law against "vagrants and crooks" that had been in force since 1933.’
    • ‘The case brings into sharp relief some of the constitutional concepts we've been studying, as does the Blair government's re-enactment of detention-without-trial legislation.’
    • ‘There was an attempted repeal and re-enactment in 1937 which failed in the Legislative Assembly.’
    • ‘My belief is, that in seeking the re-enactment of the existing law after its suspension, you would have had to contend with greater difficulties than you anticipate.’

Pronunciation

re-enactment

/ˌriəˈnæktmənt//ˌrēəˈnaktmənt/