Definition of re-employ in English:

re-employ

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Employ again.

    ‘the dismissed executives were soon re-employed’
    ‘his extensive research is re-employed in his chapter on black theater’
    • ‘So the Commission has a power of adjusting the rights of the terminated employee and re-employed employee, according to the circumstances of the case.’
    • ‘Even where, for example in an unfair dismissal case, the employment tribunal makes an order that the employee be re-employed by the employer in one way or another, if the employer fails to do so there is no contempt of court.’
    • ‘Educators have suggested reducing class sizes from 40 students to less than 25 to re-employ laid-off teachers and raise standards.’
    • ‘At 2 p.m. the workforce were told to report for work the following morning when they were re-employed, being given fresh contracts of employment.’
    • ‘Young people are not being employed; instead pensioners are re-employed on a contract basis.’
    • ‘ESS was put into voluntary liquidation in 1997 and its staff re-employed by another firm.’
    • ‘The hotel has not guaranteed it will re-employ the displaced workers when the hotel reopens in 2004.’
    • ‘For the most part, it seems that (until recently, at least) workers who lost their jobs as a result of closures in these sectors have been re-employed within a reasonable period.’
    • ‘The building society had to agree to re-employ Martin before threats were lifted by Kelly.’
    • ‘Vassilev said that the Bourgas Airport employees would be re-employed by the concessionaire and a group labour contract would be negotiated and signed with a year.’
    • ‘Less than 10% of respondents in the study population were re-employed by Tarmac plc.’
    • ‘Perhaps the most useful question is: ‘Would you re-employ this person?’’
    • ‘Bosses want to end all the workers' contracts and re-employ them on worse terms and conditions.’
    • ‘But the Post Office has refused to re-employ them.’
    • ‘It is hoped that some of the employees already made redundant will be re-employed.’
    • ‘The company intends to sack hundreds of employees and re-employ them on new contracts that slash their pay by up to £1,000, limit holiday entitlement and deny them sick pay.’
    • ‘By re-employing the Deceased the Company reassumed its duties as employer but that begs the question as to whether those duties included the duty to give pension advice.’
    • ‘They are appalled at their employer's plans to sack hundreds of catering staff and re-employ them on conditions which would amount to an annual loss of salary of up to £1,000 per employee.’
    • ‘Union bosses are refusing to negotiate until the airport withdraws threats both to re-employ staff on lesser contracts, and to impose plans to axe 150 jobs, slash wages by 40 per cent, and reduce holidays.’
    • ‘The women workers were then re-employed on half their previous salaries, with none of their previous benefits.’

Pronunciation:

re-employ

/ˌrēemˈploi/