Definition of re-emerge in English:

re-emerge

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Emerge again; come into sight or prominence once more.

    ‘nationalism has re-emerged in western Europe’
    • ‘And, secondly, the work they do with them while they are in custody is doing very little to straighten them out once they re-emerge.’
    • ‘It was around this time last year that veterans re-emerged as a potent political force to the detriment of Senator Kerry.’
    • ‘Let's be clear: China is not emerging - it is re-emerging to reclaim its traditionally exceptional place.’
    • ‘It is always an interesting phenomenon how some ideas, and/or ways of talking emerge, re-emerge or develop in different places around the world.’
    • ‘He said that in the run up to the political contest elements of the extreme right would re-emerge in Oldham looking to exploit divisions for political gain.’
    • ‘Already excited, the crowd went crazy when Garlin, re-emerging on stage in a fireproof suit, invited a horde of blue devils to light him up to make him look like a human torch.’
    • ‘I doubt Ms Rowling read Ginzburg before inventing Harry Potter, so we must be looking at a folk memory re-emerging periodically along highly structured symbolic axes.’
    • ‘The players retreated down the tunnel briefly before re-emerging for the final act as Rovers captain Michael McNamara lifted the cup and the party began.’
    • ‘‘Swan Lake was re-emerging as a cultural icon and really finding its way back into the public domain,’ says the Australian.’
    • ‘Even as the Kurds celebrate their success in becoming powerbrokers of the new Iraqi government, some old tensions are re-emerging.’
    • ‘China is re-emerging as a great power, the way we [United States] emerged as a power in the late 1870s and the 1880s.’
    • ‘It is, however, very largely because of this ‘victory’ that the religious question is re-emerging once again, on both an individual and social level.’
    • ‘Slavery emerges from powerful psychological forces in the unconscious, and consequently is part of the political unconscious that constantly re-emerges into public expression.’
    • ‘A Conservative councillor once hid up a chimney in the debating chamber and re-emerged to swing a crucial vote.’
    • ‘Nonetheless, we have to look forward, although I do not think that we will see a pattern re-emerging in market behaviour until the geopolitical situation is resolved."’
    • ‘However, nuclear power is re-emerging as a contender - despite huge costs and the long-term disposal worries - as it does not contribute to carbon emissions.’
    • ‘The risk of disappointment is very great and analysts warn that France could see old divisions re-emerging very quickly, even if there is a change of president.’
    • ‘Just buy something from them in order to help them keep Communism from re-emerging and you can be assured that your dollars are doing good in the world.’
    • ‘This strategy is helping the prison system to outlast current budget constraints so it can re-emerge once state revenues recover.’
    • ‘A dozen people have died of bird flu in Vietnam since December 30, raising concerns that the disease could be re-emerging after an outbreak last year in 10 Asian countries.’

Pronunciation:

re-emerge

/ˌrēəˈmərj/