Definition of ramble in US English:

ramble

verb

[no object]
  • 1Walk for pleasure, typically without a definite route.

    • ‘He was cut out neither for religion nor for the dry minutiae of algebra and he idled away his days in long country rambles around Oxford, collecting curiosities for his own natural history collection.’
    • ‘His home life was happy; like so many geologists, young Adam spent time rambling through the countryside, looking at and collecting rocks and fossils.’
    • ‘Surely we should be able to walk our dogs or simply ramble along in safety and in peace to enjoy the views and healthy exercise?’
    • ‘A man with a great fondness for the outdoor life, he loved to ramble in the countryside and experience the peace and quiet of the land.’
    • ‘Outside Stromness I walked the marshes where as a boy John Rae rambled with a musket on his shoulder, and in Kirkwall I visited the explorer's memorial in St Magnus Cathedral, and his grave site behind that edifice.’
    • ‘Please note that you cannot drive around Loch Katrine, but if you fancy a long country stroll, you can ramble right round the perimeter, and I doubt if there is a lovelier walk anywhere in Britain.’
    • ‘When I was at school, we went rambling in the Kent countryside as part of our activities week, something we did before we broke up for our summer holidays.’
    • ‘All your outdoor pursuits are catered for - whether you're rambling in the Republic or sauntering in the Six Counties.’
    • ‘‘At the same time it is creating a right to roam, giving walkers carte blanche to ramble in the countryside,’ he said.’
    walk, take a walk, go for a walk, hike, tramp, backpack, trek
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  • 2Talk or write at length in a confused or inconsequential way.

    ‘he rambled on about his acting career’
    • ‘I rambled on about Grandma and my family for the first pint and then we talked about other stuff for the second pint.’
    • ‘He rambled on about fringe issues such as pensions and fuel tax but, amateurishly, did not mention the food and gardening TV debate.’
    • ‘Oh dear, I think I've rambled on for far too long.’
    • ‘Last week I rambled on about tenuous arts performances in the High Street, but this week it got worse.’
    • ‘I've rambled on for quite a bit, and, as is typical, I haven't managed to get to the point yet.’
    • ‘He was whining and rambling about the shortage of coal imports in his country.’
    • ‘I went out and introduced myself, and they rambled on about their headaches, their vomiting, their diarrhea.’
    • ‘Readers may remember the little eye problem I glibly referred to a few weeks ago when I rambled on about hypochondria.’
    • ‘As we walked, the gunman rambled about his hatred of doctors.’
    • ‘And I've rambled on far too much, but only because I warmed to the subject as I was writing about it.’
    • ‘Yesterday I rambled on at far too great a length about elections.’
    • ‘He rambled on rather inconsequentially for some time.’
    • ‘Trisha looked out the window, ignoring the boys rambling about old fights and stupid bets.’
    • ‘He looked a lot more rested last night and while he rambled on a bit, he didn't stutter as much as I thought he would.’
    • ‘He listened while I rambled on with my sales talk.’
    • ‘Prodded to explain, she rambled on about balloons.’
    • ‘And she only rambled on about how it was hard for me at home and if I ever needed anyone to talk to, her door is always open.’
    • ‘I have rambled on enough and so will end this chapter of our correspondence here.’
    • ‘I know I've rambled on a bit, but it's to illustrate a point.’
    • ‘Eventually, she rambled on to discover it was still their error, and I owe them much less money than they try to steal from me every month.’
    chatter, babble, prattle, prate, blather, blether, gabble, jabber, twitter, go on, run on, rattle away, rattle on, blither, maunder, drivel
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  • 3(of a plant) put out long shoots and grow over walls or other plants.

    • ‘Climbing types reach 6 feet tall and can gracefully twine up fences and arbors, or ramble over the ground.’
    • ‘Whether they twine, cling, or ramble, climbing plants enhance good architecture and camouflage the not-so-good.’
    • ‘Patterns of olive leaves, golden scallop shells, and intricate pastel designs ramble over the walls.’
    • ‘Their lily-pad leaves and bright orange, yellow, or red flowers ramble over picket fences and along the ground.’

noun

  • A walk taken for pleasure in the countryside.

    • ‘He goes for long, sensuous rambles into the woods, often while remembering his childhood friend Lumley.’
    • ‘In 1836 naturalist Charles Darwin says, ‘I so much enjoyed my rambles among the roads and mountains of St. Helena.’’
    • ‘He enjoyed his regular rambles to the pubs in the village where he was always made very welcome.’
    • ‘This year, as well as the regular walks, it is also planned to introduce a countryside ramble which is aimed at anyone interested in a leisurely Sunday afternoon walk with a focus on the local environment.’
    • ‘Shipley still has the pale turquoise eyes and easy grin he had as a young man, and it sometimes startles him to realize that those backcountry rambles are a half-century in the past.’
    • ‘There will also be plenty of guided walks ranging from gentle riverside rambles to more challenging hill walks.’
    • ‘Found mainly in country pubs, it provides sustenance after a good ramble through the fields.’
    • ‘The Macduff Circle at Edinburgh's Dean Gallery is one of several sculptures by Bristol-born Long dedicated to his Scottish rambles.’
    • ‘He was an accomplished card player and loved to meet the locals in Garrafrauns, Brickens, Cloonfad, Irishtown or wherever his rambles would take him.’
    • ‘Based at 18 excellent country houses, they have a wide choice of walks from gentle rambles to adventure treks.’
    • ‘After the country ramble, it's time to return to the urban reality of the studio proper overlooking the Brixton Road.’
    • ‘After a four-hour ramble on foot through deep gorges, past monasteries, and up steep, forested hillsides, we arrive in Chhulemu, Babu's home village.’
    • ‘Interspersed among the chapters describing these rambles are excursions into the history of the waterfront's architecture, geology, literature and development.’
    • ‘The Slieve Bloom Rural Co-op Walking Club's weekly rambles have now begun.’
    • ‘Other walks will also include rural rambles, a walk around the town centre, short strolls, hard moorland walks and family walks.’
    • ‘This is a ramble rather than a full-blown hill walk and should appeal to a wide number of people.’
    • ‘Although the walk can be generally classified as a ramble rather than a full-blown hill-walk, it is planned to go to Tully Summit.’
    • ‘A ramble through Waterford's scenic countryside, mountains and coastline will never be the same again once you have read a new book about 15 of the county's great walks.’
    • ‘She had been in the habit of taking long country rambles with Mr Dawson's children in her old days of dependence, and she thought very little of a distance of three miles.’
    • ‘Annabelle is encouraging people to don their hiking boots and take a ramble through the countryside to find love.’
    walk, hike, trek
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Origin

Late Middle English (in ramble (sense 2 of the verb)): probably related to Middle Dutch rammelen, used of animals in the sense ‘wander about on heat’, also to the noun ram.

Pronunciation

ramble

/ˈræmbəl//ˈrambəl/