Main definitions of rally in English

: rally1rally2

rally1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1(of troops) come together again in order to continue fighting after a defeat or dispersion.

    ‘De Montfort's troops rallied and drove back the king's infantry’
    • ‘He lost half of his new fleet; but his troops rallied and in turn defeated the rebels.’
    • ‘The Trojans rally again and continue to push onward.’
    • ‘It is almost unheard of for beaten troops to rally and charge again, as happened at Solygea in 425.’
    • ‘But the French Army rallied, the enemy was driven back and the borders of Revolutionary France began to expand.’
    • ‘Hundreds of members of his army rallied in the streets on Saturday, carrying arms and chanting slogans of support for him.’
    • ‘At one point US First Army commander Omar Bradley considered evacuating the beach and taking his men to one of the others, but eventually the troops rallied and fought their way inland.’
    • ‘Freeman's troops rallied, held the Chinese off and miraculously survived.’
    reassemble, regroup, re-form, reunite, gather together again, get together again
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Bring together (forces) again in order to continue fighting.
      ‘the king escaped to Perth to rally his own forces’
      • ‘Instead, he had sent Afan on to rally the forces left in Nottingham to move out and meet Arthur in battle once more.’
      • ‘Temujin now rallies the tribes for a desperate attack on Urga.’
      • ‘He himself appeared in Sukhumi in a steel helmet, trying to rally his forces at the last moment, and only escaped by the skin of his teeth.’
      • ‘Nearby, in a path between the mountains, the general of the Imperial army was rallying her troops.’
      • ‘If anything, he argued, the soldiers would need a strategist and a symbol of hope to rally them towards victory.’
      • ‘Edmund rallied his forces, and for a little while it seemed that the Danes might still be driven back.’
      • ‘Microsoft, on the other hand, is playing its same old strategies and strengths - rallying an entire community around it.’
      • ‘Kourin ran up to him and they exchanged quick nods as Regnor continued to rally his troops.’
      • ‘In the ensuing attempt, Dunbar survives and rallies the Union troops to win the battle.’
      • ‘Despite the relentless Mamluk pressure, Kitbuqa continued to rally his men.’
      • ‘The Assistant Division Commander of the 29 th Infantry was trying to rally his men, who were pinned down on the beaches by heavy German fire.’
      • ‘If things go badly, you can quickly move to rally shaken leaders and units.’
      • ‘The French failed to rally all non-Communist forces behind the weak Bao Dai, while their tanks and superior equipment made little headway in jungle warfare.’
      muster, marshal, mobilize, raise, call up, call to arms, recruit, enlist, conscript, draft
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    2. 1.2 Assemble in a mass meeting.
      ‘up to 50,000 people rallied in the city center’
      • ‘Over a quarter of a million marched in London, and tens of thousands more rallied in other cities in Britain and Scotland.’
      • ‘Hundreds of striking council workers rallied at a mass meeting in York today as their actions hit city centre tourists, shoppers and motorists.’
      • ‘Railway staff from Bangalore and outlying towns, such as Kirandul and Koraput, rallied near the main city station.’
      • ‘The protesters, who rallied near the Assembly building in downtown San Jose, confronted hundreds of police.’
      • ‘In the northern city of Salta, striking bus drivers mobilized and rallied at City Hall, demanding three months unpaid wages.’
      • ‘In Philadelphia, for example, students rallied at the Liberty Bell where they dressed up like the founding fathers for a dramatic reading of the Declaration.’
      • ‘The tension over the future of the company increased last week when 200 of the town's population of 3,000 rallied in support of the sacked workers.’
      • ‘In the US, demonstrators rallied in several cities, both for and against the war.’
      • ‘Several thousand rallied at an early march in the south-western city of Toulouse.’
      • ‘The seething masses, still reeling, rallied and demanded a debate in the Commons.’
      • ‘More than 700 people rallied in Hobart on July 15 to save Ralphs Bay in the Derwent estuary from a huge canal and housing development.’
      • ‘In Hobart, capital of the island state Tasmania, 500 students from a dozen different schools rallied in the city's Franklin Square.’
      • ‘In the United States, demonstrators rallied in several cities, both for and against the war.’
      • ‘In the meantime, citizens are rallying in the piazzas, collecting signatures and marching around buildings.’
      • ‘Hundreds of teachers marched and rallied in the cities of Salta and Oran, supported by parents and other workers.’
      gather, accumulate, collect, assemble, amass, muster, marshal, organize, round up, garner, harvest
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    3. 1.3 Bring or come together in order to support a person or cause or for concerted action.
      with object ‘a series of meetings to rally support for the union’
      no object ‘conservatives in the GOP rallied behind Goldwater’
      • ‘Omar's speech was a desperate move to rally what little support he had left.’
      • ‘If the city were to rally behind this worthwhile and important cause and start planning now for a 2005 ride, Cycle For Life could be back in York.’
      • ‘Chapter organizer Jack Kelly rallied 300 people to oppose the new housing at the Land Use Commission's hearing.’
      • ‘Among those who have rallied behind him is a former teacher in a government school at Chattarpur who now takes yoga and meditation classes regularly here.’
      • ‘We will rally the world to this cause by our efforts, by our courage.’
      • ‘The entire world rallied behind this resolution that gives him one last chance.’
      • ‘Maybe a critical mass of Democrats would rally behind the one stable candidate.’
      • ‘But faculty have not rallied behind him previously.’
      • ‘Following the meeting, residents have rallied to launch the petition, which is opposed to the closure of the two schools.’
      • ‘The campaign was revolutionary in its use of the Internet to raise funds and rally the masses.’
      • ‘Republicans, on the other hand, rallied behind tax cuts.’
      • ‘This year, Democratic primary voters shut down the nominating process earlier than ever, and rallied behind Kerry.’
      • ‘He rallied behind the president-elect and we had a transition that went forward in a smooth way and I think we may be on the lip of such a situation here, not for certain.’
      • ‘We will be out in force to make sure people know what's going on and rallying even more support.’
      • ‘The president must rally the country around a clear and credible goal.’
      • ‘What better opportunity for rallying the country behind the President could there have been?’
      • ‘A local community has rallied to support an asylum seeker who is facing deportation.’
      • ‘As a result, the entire campus rallied behind the program.’
      • ‘Thanks to those who rallied to raise money to buy the property back, there is now an ongoing effort to create the Thoreau Institute and to restore historic structures on the property.’
      • ‘A grandmother has expressed her gratitude to local people who rallied to raise more than £30,000.’
      • ‘When Gomberg passed away in unfortunate circumstances in Halifax last year, the whole community rallied behind his message of hope, love, and green activism.’
      • ‘Community-spirited people and businesses across York are rallying to help a city Scout group rise from the ashes after its building and equipment was destroyed in an arson attack.’
      • ‘After all, it's hard to rally around a city council or an embattled mayor.’
      • ‘He hopes to rally them all behind his candidacy for chief.’
      • ‘One group rallied behind Sulla and in 88 B.C. he invaded Rome.’
      • ‘Locals have rallied behind the push to start a community bank on the Balmain peninsula with almost 30 people registering their interest so far.’
      • ‘He rallied great popular support for his scheme.’
      • ‘But when the war came, the majority of these men rallied behind the Union and the Republican administration.’
      • ‘But since then other villagers have rallied to support him.’
      come together, get together, band together, assemble, group, join, join together, join forces, link, link up, combine, unite, ally, collaborate, cooperate, work together, act together, pull together
      View synonyms
  • 2Recover or cause to recover in health, spirits, or poise.

    no object ‘she floundered for a moment, then rallied again’
    with object ‘they rallied her with a drink’
    • ‘He rallied and was thought to be improving until the early hours of Friday last week when he suffered a severe setback, developing a lung infection and being put on a ventilator in intensive care.’
    • ‘He remains in a hospital trying to rally from serious head, lung, and rib injuries.’
    • ‘There was a time last year when I didn't think for one moment she would still be with us but she rallied and is still going strong.’
    • ‘To everyone's relief, eventually Wood rallied and recovered.’
    recover, improve, get better, pick up, revive, come back, make a comeback, rebound, bounce back, perk up, look up, take a turn for the better, turn a corner, turn the corner, be given a new lease of life, take on a new lease of life
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 (of share, currency, or commodity prices) increase after a fall.
      ‘prices of metals such as aluminum and copper have rallied’
      • ‘If we are correct, and at some future date the price of gold rallies like the yen did, there will be financial turmoil.’
      • ‘After falling to an all-time low of 8p a share, the price has rallied over the past month.’
      • ‘However, the shares rallied later in the day as the market digested the news.’
      • ‘At a minimum, there would be a month or two in which consumer and corporate spending would surge and stock prices would rally.’
      • ‘HP shares had rallied on the early news of layoffs, but they're slightly slower today.’
  • 3Drive in a rally.

    • ‘The 23-year-old has been rallying for six years, including stints in both Group N Mitsubishi and Fiat Punto Super 1600 cars.’
    • ‘‘We just keep finding the limit,’ said Mark on Friday as he rallied on the island for the first time.’
    • ‘However, Gareth has rallied in Ireland in recent times, so he is certainly familiar with pace note asphalt rallies.’
    • ‘‘We only started rallying in 2001 and since then we've only ever done five events a year at most,’ admits Myers, who is a sail-maker by profession.’
    • ‘He has been rallying for six years and entered the 2004 Safari Rally.’
    1. 3.1 (in tennis and other racket sports) engage in a rally.

noun

  • 1A mass meeting of people making a political protest or showing support for a cause.

    ‘a rally attended by around 100,000 people’
    • ‘Campaigners for cancer services in the South-East are planning protest rallies after the regional health board abandoned its fight for radiotherapy in the region.’
    • ‘Her group sends gifts to the troops and holds rallies at Columbia University supporting the war effort.’
    • ‘Tippe added that the military is also anticipating the likelihood of mass student rallies during the visit.’
    • ‘Last week, health workers carried out protest rallies at Santiago hospitals and clinics.’
    • ‘Speeches from the gigantic demonstration in Melbourne were broadcast on satellite television to union rallies in every city and town.’
    • ‘The following is the text of a speech given at an antiwar rally in New York City's Central Park on October 6.’
    • ‘My activities went from merely attending meetings, rallies, and protests to organizing them.’
    • ‘Deming's vision of leadership centres upon coaching and personal development, not holding mass rallies in town squares.’
    • ‘May Day rallies took place around Australia on the May 1-2 weekend.’
    • ‘Soldiers were positioned at strategic points in the city and at election rallies where huge crowds gathered.’
    • ‘The Chilean Student Confederation announced plans for mass rallies across the country this Thursday in an escalation of the struggle.’
    • ‘Thousands also attended a protest rally in Castlebar after the opening of the new orthopaedic unit at Mayo General was cancelled.’
    • ‘Health workers held lunchtime rallies outside several hospitals, including in London, Birmingham and Sheffield.’
    • ‘Activists are holding rallies to raise awareness, urging families to tell schools to keep their personal data private.’
    • ‘For example, service members as well as government civilians can attend political meetings or rallies.’
    • ‘We attended meetings and protest rallies during our high school years, and our mother organized a tutoring project for poor children.’
    • ‘Hundreds of people are expected to turn out today for a mass rally in support of efforts to save the historic Duke of Wellington's Regiment.’
    • ‘The trend among schools and colleges alike to organise peace rallies and cultural programmes to foster a spirit of cultural and national unity amongst their students is steadily on the uptake.’
    • ‘As part of that effort, Tony backed Earth Day, serving as chair of the April 1970 rally in New York City.’
    • ‘Demonstrations and mass protest rallies in the early 1990s turned into riots in which several hundred were killed and thousands arrested.’
    meeting, mass meeting, gathering, assembly, tweetup
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    1. 1.1 An open-air event for people who own a particular kind of vehicle.
      ‘a traction engine rally’
      • ‘Keighley Bus Museum Trust is hosting its eighth historic vehicle rally, at Marley playing fields.’
      • ‘At least 15 ex-WYRCC vehicles are expected to be involved in the rally, at Keighley Bus Museum Trust's Old Dalton Lane depot, on September 21.’
      • ‘This year's historic vehicle rally will be the tenth annual event and takes place at Marley Showground on June 19.’
      • ‘Martin said police would also be quizzing local golfers at a course near Brinsbury Park, as well as visitors to a vintage vehicle rally at Pulborough.’
      • ‘The move comes after two people were hurt when a car crashed into a crowd of spectators during a rally of high-performance vehicles on the Armytage Road Industrial Estate.’
      • ‘Mr Halliwell said the big festival events of last Sunday, such as the SportKarnival and vintage vehicle rally, appeared to be successful.’
      • ‘The East Lancs Railway will provide the perfect platform for a rally and classic car event later this year.’
      • ‘The six-day rally was for vehicles built before 1980.’
      • ‘Their numerous annual funding raising events include the vintage rally, the Slieve Bloom walk, a golf classic and Sunflower day and coffee morning.’
      • ‘On the final day, a rally of all vehicles will be organised.’
      • ‘He reckons no one else locally has driven their historic lorry so many miles to attend a vehicle rally.’
      • ‘Among the exhibits at the rally will be a steam-driven threshing and baling set demonstrated by Johnson's of Banks, near Southport.’
      • ‘It was star attraction at an historic vehicle rally at Dudley, West Midlands, yesterday.’
      • ‘Over 300 people in 97 vehicles joined in the rally for a weekend of fun and games.’
      • ‘Plenty of carnivalgoers were attracted to the vintage car display and on Sunday there was a commercial vehicle rally.’
      • ‘The Kildare Branch of the IWAI is organising the boat rally and the event will mark the beginning of the boating season this year for the inland waterways.’
  • 2also rallyeA competition for motor vehicles in which they are driven a long distance over public roads or rough terrain, typically in stages and through checkpoints.

    as modifier ‘a rally driver’
    • ‘Cannonball Run Europe is a timed event and therefore classed as a rally not a race.’
    • ‘Amazingly, although set up to tackle the roughest rally terrain in the world, the Group B cars could race on a track as well.’
    • ‘The rally consisted of 22 stages run over 3 days in mainly dry conditions.’
    • ‘Like the other two hot gravel rallies, the start order on the opening day is important because there will be loose gravel on the surface which is a big handicap for the first cars.’
    • ‘‘This rally is the best of the rough rallies we do,’ said the 30-year-old Finn.’
    • ‘Rowlands freely admits he feels inexperienced on tarmac rallies and that he is still on a steep learning curve.’
    • ‘They will also continue to compete in historic road rallies.’
    • ‘Since then, the young French driver finished the ten rallies in which he took part, winning four of them, and scored podium points on four other occasions.’
    • ‘Antoine Bessette lost his rear wing in the closing laps of the race, but the former rally driver kept firm control of his car and finished in eighth.’
    • ‘He only encountered a problem on the penultimate stage of the rally, when his gearbox seized.’
    • ‘Schumacher takes on rally drivers in Race of Champions on BBC’
    • ‘It is a happy medium between the two featuring rally road races, closed circuits and other challenging environments.’
    • ‘But the Estonian's chances were wrecked by a puncture on the longest stage of the rally, which he had to stop and change.’
    • ‘After his roll on the Astra Stages rally, Colin Hope had rebuilt his Nova for this event.’
    • ‘I've never seen a rally race route through a city, but TGR makes it look good.’
    • ‘Of the three hot, rough rallies in Cyprus, Greece and Turkey, this is the best from a drivers' view.’
    • ‘After Sardinia, Cyprus and Turkey, the long tour of Mediterranean gravel rallies that kicked off at the beginning of April will end over the sun-baked tracks of central Greece.’
    • ‘The car has been faultless on all three rallies, and Geoff is giving me a huge amount of confidence in the car and in my own performances.’
    • ‘‘I enjoy the faster rallies more than the slower ones,’ said 28-year-old Märtin.’
    • ‘Solberg set the pace for the first two days of the rally, winning five stages in a row.’
  • 3A quick or marked recovery after a reverse or a period of weakness.

    ‘the market staged a late rally’
    • ‘Now comes not a rally in the dollar but a decline that some are describing as the start of a decisive, massive and epochal shift of support away from the currency - and from America.’
    • ‘It suggests the possibility of gaining a similar result over a future time period made up of bear market declines and bullish rallies.’
    • ‘If it is quick, cheap and decisive, we should see a rally of sorts, but if it is long, expensive and messy, financial markets can kiss any putative 2003 recovery goodbye.’
    • ‘The consensus view may be that a slowing economy explains the bond rally, but I remain quite skeptical.’
    • ‘The dollar has advanced 1.9 percent during the three-week rally, trimming its decline to 11.8 percent in the year.’
    • ‘The move also raised worries that the rally could stall Europe's economic recovery.’
    • ‘Of course, the market is not immune to the domestic economy and its recent rally is partly explained by a brighter outlook for interest rates.’
    • ‘But the doubts about the strength of recovery have been sufficiently strong as to help a rally in the UK fixed interest market and a fall in fixed interest yields.’
    • ‘Some analysts suggest the dollar rally may be overdone, raising prospects of a euro recovery in the months ahead.’
    • ‘Despite the lower valuation of the company, technology shares in Europe recovered from early loss to resume a recent rally.’
    • ‘Short-lived rallies followed by drift and decline are likely to be the order of the day for 2003.’
    • ‘A continuing stock market rally and rapidly recovering economy would not be favorable developments for this vulnerable financial Bubble.’
    • ‘Bulk alloy prices have halted their free fall and are showing some signs of recovery, although few people expect a major rally.’
    • ‘Still, the Fed isn't done stimulating the economy and the rallies in bonds and stocks suggest investors agree.’
    • ‘Overall, Bedford thinks a mild rally this past fall will probably be followed by another marked drop in share prices.’
    • ‘Contributing to the two-month rally in gold prices was a decline in sales of borrowed gold by producers, analysts said.’
    • ‘Dealers said the dollar's rise was in response to the rally in New York stock prices and the continuing decline on the Tokyo stock market Thursday.’
    • ‘Markets are unpredictable, and even the smartest market watchers can't predict sudden rallies and declines.’
    • ‘And there is his basic and perhaps rather obvious point that the decline of civilisations proceeds in a serious of routs and rallies.’
    • ‘Yet most analysts of the Indonesian economy agree that a consumption rally alone can't sustain recovery.’
    recovery, upturn, improvement, revival, comeback, rebound, resurgence, renewal, a turn for the better, reaction
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    1. 3.1 (in baseball and football) a renewed or sustained offensive, usually by the losing team, that ties or wins the game.
      • ‘Another intense rally opens the third game of the set and the American just sneaks the point.’
      • ‘Cabrera didn't get the ball out of the infield, the rally died and the team lost.’
      • ‘The current lineup can't consistently sustain rallies or show discipline at the plate.’
      • ‘Ardmoy led by eight points at the interval but a spirited second half rally by the home team saw them snatch a dramatic victory in the closing stages.’
      • ‘Kildare did not deserve to lose after that second-half rally.’
  • 4(in tennis and other racket sports) an extended exchange of strokes between players.

    • ‘This resulted in a complete lack of rhythm and short rallies punctuated by frequent drop shots.’
    • ‘I like the back-and-forth sound in tennis of two good players having a long rally or even just warming up.’
    • ‘With his ability to abbreviate his backswing and his penchant for quick rallies, Wimbledon offers him more opportunity.’
    • ‘Once in a while a tennis match will reach its climax with both players convinced they are going to win until the last stroke of the last rally.’
    • ‘When he was 10, he worked as a ball boy at a seniors' tournament, giving him the chance to hit a few rallies with John McEnroe.’

Origin

Early 17th century (in the sense ‘bring together again’): from French rallier, from re- ‘again’ + allier ‘to ally’.

Pronunciation

rally

/ˈralē//ˈræli/

Main definitions of rally in English

: rally1rally2

rally2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]archaic
  • Subject (someone) to good-humored ridicule; tease.

    ‘he rallied her on the length of her pigtail’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French railler ‘to rib, tease’ (see rail).

Pronunciation

rally

/ˈralē//ˈræli/