Main definitions of rag in English

: rag1rag2rag3rag4rag5

rag1

noun

  • 1A piece of old cloth, especially one torn from a larger piece, used typically for cleaning things.

    ‘he wiped his hands on an oily rag’
    ‘a piece of rag’
    • ‘Finally, polish the tiles with soapy water and a rag or sponge to remove the dried-on film of grout.’
    • ‘Then she turns back around and hands me a rag, ‘Go clean off the tables then get out of here.’’
    • ‘‘Here, let me help you,’ he picked a rag and started cleaning Jonas' closet doors.’
    • ‘The material looked to be nothing more than a small piece of an old rag or the corner of an old handkerchief.’
    • ‘There should be a clean rag under my pillow on the cot.’
    • ‘Though it follows no known pattern of quiltmaking, and though it is made of bits and pieces of worthless rags, it is obviously the work of a person of powerful imagination and deep spiritual feeling.’
    • ‘Before she could even get to the rags to start cleaning, she collapsed on the floor.’
    • ‘He leaned down to gather clean water in the rag for rinsing, running the cloth over the same areas.’
    • ‘She hurried over to one of the cabinets, not waiting for an answer, and pulled out a bottle of witch hazel and two clean rags.’
    • ‘Forty-five years ago, he duked it out with his father over whether to expand into uniforms from the business of reclaiming and cleaning industrial rags.’
    • ‘Waving pieces of wing fabric and burning oily rags in a bucket, the men enthusiastically entered into this exercise, mindful that it might save them from another night at sea.’
    • ‘Christie kept her eyes fixed on the girl as she wiped her hands clean on a rag and straightened her apron, finally coming out of the kitchen into the hall.’
    • ‘The woman strode quickly to the tables, scooped up a few fallen petals, and dusted the throne with a clean rag, though it was already sparkling magnificence.’
    • ‘Even pieces of rags were shoved into the gaps peeping through the corners of its locked door.’
    • ‘Quickly, he ran to grab some rags to clean up, shaking his head - he knew he'd ruined his chance.’
    • ‘He searches through drawers and finds a rag to clean the kit.’
    • ‘Then he disassembled the rifle and cleaned it with rags and a long, thin brush.’
    • ‘It hadn't taken Lee long to come back with a clean wet cloth before the cold rag was pressed to Kris' scalp.’
    • ‘Pure-white, 100-percent cotton rags are the choice of professional painters.’
    • ‘Presently she came back with a kettle of water still warm from the noon fire and a bundle of clean rags.’
    piece of cloth, bit of cloth, fragment of cloth, scrap of cloth, cloth
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1rags Old or tattered clothes.
      • ‘As part of a campaign to tame his wild bride, the groom showed up late, wearing rags and old boots, and carrying a broken sword.’
      • ‘The photograph depicts two youths in horrendously tattered rags.’
      • ‘Their faces are scarred from infections caused by sandfly bites, and they are dressed in filthy rags.’
      • ‘They were dressed and starring blankly around the room at the other girls who were obviously forcing themselves out of bed and into their tattered rags.’
      • ‘There's one guy who gets on the tube with an accordion, while his son, in tattered rags, goes up and down the aisles with a Pringles can to collect spare change.’
      • ‘In rags she huddled in the corner of her dank cell.’
      • ‘But they don't moan, because it's not that big a deal; they simply don their gaudy rags and their dancing shoes and get on with it.’
      • ‘He was shabbily dressed, but not in tattered rags as many of the beggars had been.’
      • ‘The ‘paint’ consisted of about ten people dressed in multicloured rags who either held on or let go of the roller as the effect required.’
      • ‘At the welcoming ceremony all the children lined up, looking like brilliant, unidentifiable flowers in their rags and robes of reds and maroons.’
      • ‘These women, of every age of life, with their tattered rags falling off their thin arms, stood silent as we passed.’
      • ‘Why were the noble elite of an advanced Iron Age tribe dressed in drab rags and covered in mud?’
      • ‘He is barely recognisable among the grime, dressed in filthy rags and as anaemic and leaden as his surroundings.’
      • ‘There was no water to drink or wash in and children were begging, dressed in filthy rags.’
      • ‘Who would leave a child in this kind of weather in nothing but rags?’
      • ‘Clothed in gray rags, the expression on her face was happier than anyone else's Marcy had ever seen: half joy, half, Marcy perceived, stark, raving mad.’
      • ‘You could see the homeless on the streets, in their tattered rags and scraps of what were once new, clean clothes; they were all begging.’
      • ‘A lone figure in tattered oily rags walked away from the work pit, ignoring the grunts and noise as slaves returned to their tasks.’
      • ‘The city and its people were immaculately clean, the paths and squares swept, and the humblest canoemen clean in his rags.’
      • ‘He had a clean appearance despite his rags and an honest weary face.’
      tattered clothes, torn clothing, tatters, old clothes, cast-offs, hand-me-downs
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2rags The remnants of something.
      ‘she clung to the rags of her self-control’
    3. 1.3archaic with negative The smallest scrap of cloth or clothing.
      ‘not a rag of clothing has arrived to us this winter’
  • 2informal A newspaper, typically one regarded as being of low quality.

    ‘the local rag’
    • ‘The second disturbing thing was this headline in my local rag.’
    • ‘Livingstone courted right wing rags like the Evening Standard, writing a restaurant column for them.’
    • ‘This is the kind of though-provoking journalism sorely lacking in some of our more prominent rags.’
    • ‘He interviewed some of rock's greatest musicians and eventually went on to become an editor of the legendary rock rag.’
    • ‘Capitalism is alive and well in the square, even among the socialists, who sell their revolutionary-workers buttons and news rags.’
    • ‘This was the tactic of the scandal rags and Hollywood gossip sheets, and it was just not done.’
    • ‘Take the business of this newspaper, the rag that backed the rebel faction, and that was closed down for 60 days last month.’
    • ‘Two weeks back they didn't publish personal ads in my local rag, then last week the kid that delivers the paper left it on top of the letterbox, allowing the rain to do its evil work.’
    • ‘I'm a health care reporter for our local rag.’
    • ‘There are tabloid rags that sully the name of reporting, and there are informed, articulate blogs that raise this medium to a far more rarefied level.’
    • ‘This was a respectable newspaper and not another of those despicable rags printed in other towns.’
    • ‘How did she work as a promising and up-rising journalist at one of the country's most popular tabloid rags?’
    • ‘Verily, we must be living in a golden age of journalism if the number of prize-winning rags and hacks is anything to go by.’
    • ‘He relieves some of his frustration by writing letters to the editor of the local rag and lovingly tends his collection of fountain pens.’
    • ‘Alfreda has seen an advert for that mechanical stage musical, ‘Starlight Express’ in the local rag.’
    • ‘It's a slice of journalism worthy of those other weekly rags, like Woman's Day.’
    • ‘You find yourself warming to the fascist rag when they indulge in top-quality journalism like this.’
    • ‘Journalists working on the rag are up in arms over a series of anti-Gypsy stories printed over the last few weeks.’
    • ‘At the moment I'm torn between having my death notice appear in the local paper for my area, or in the weekly rag that's published in my home town.’
    • ‘I finding that reading the letters in my local rag gives me an insight into the strength of feeling about key issues.’

Phrases

  • be on the rag

    • informal Be menstruating.

      • ‘In grade seven, she leaked red pen all over my seat so that I walked around all day like I was on the rag in my cool new white jeans.’
      • ‘At first he was expecting his client to be some pimple face, tub of lard, that choked a guy who made a fat joke while she was on the rag but seeing this girl he now new better than to think of the typical.’
      • ‘He said he didn't want to see some ugly broads moan about being on the rag.’
      • ‘Now that everyone in the store was informed of the fact that I was on the rag, I made my selection and took it up to the counter.’
      • ‘And true, being on the rag makes us all more pains in the butt.’
  • in rags

    • 1(of clothes) tattered and torn.

      • ‘They were unwashed, their clothes all in rags, visible signs of beatings and hunger on them.’
      • ‘He was angry enough anyway, for not only were his clothes in rags, but they had now taken away his dagger.’
      • ‘His clothes were in rags and had been washed away by the Sea, and she marvelled at the grace and the beauty of his form.’
      • ‘Her fists and claws tore away at his jumpsuit until his shirt was in rags and his bare chest marked with deep cuts and scratches.’
      • ‘His clothes were in rags, covered with holes and dirt.’
      • ‘In stumbled a wretch of a man, tall and athletically built, yet covered in dirt and blood, his clothes in rags, his eyes unsteadily flickering from side to side.’
      • ‘It turned out to be John, ‘looking very poorly in health, with all his teeth gone and his clothes in rags.’’
      • ‘Her dresses were always in rags from riding the ‘manly way’ and from following her older brother around.’
      1. 1.1(of a person) wearing tattered old clothes.
        • ‘Laborers in rags are squatting in the mud in front of the building.’
        • ‘She thought it strange that children's clothes were sold here after all, for she had seen very few children, and all of them in rags.’
        • ‘Washington didn't give up when his soldiers were in rags and despair at Valley Forge.’
        • ‘Kids in rags walked helplessly around with ‘puppy-dog’ looks in their faces.’
        • ‘Everyone stared at me as I entered; after all, I was in rags and looking very distraught and deranged.’
        • ‘The poor and sick wandered the streets at night in rags.’
        • ‘However, Geneva found that the alley was not ‘vacant’ for two men in rags leered at her from afar.’
        • ‘An old man in rags walks past slowly, looking around.’
        • ‘She was holding at her shawl as she stood in rags and bare feet.’
        • ‘When my wife and I arrived here, she was in rags, scared of her own shadow,’ I growled.’

Origin

Middle English: probably a back-formation from ragged or raggy.

Pronunciation

rag

/ræɡ//raɡ/

Main definitions of rag in English

: rag1rag2rag3rag4rag5

rag2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Make fun of (someone) in a loud, boisterous manner.

    • ‘Nick's friends rag him about being Suzanne's lapdog, especially after they find out Nick has offered to drive her to the airport.’
    • ‘Mind you, that didn't stop us from ragging him rotten all day about being ‘under-equipped’!’
    • ‘The lads were ragging me about that, declaring I had lost my touch, he laughed.’
    • ‘I clearly recall ragging my mother for her expensive taste in clothing before I was even a pre-teen.’
    • ‘Apparently they are not impressed about my ragging their class mascot.’
    • ‘He keeps it light and he has just the right touch and timing to know when to rag me about it and when to lay off and let me do things in my own time.’
    • ‘Instead of being ragged and teased on all year like I was last year, I decided to bring just a few cassettes that I made over the summer.’
    • ‘In interviews, he is so polished and articulate that his teammates rag him as an Ivy Leaguer (he went to Nebraska).’
    • ‘It's like watching your child being ragged in the schoolyard.’
    • ‘They rag each other endlessly about race and all its permutations, yet two men couldn't be more bonded together than they are in these mysteries.’
    • ‘Hey, I'm not ragging you guys, it's nice to know someone actually reads my stuff…’
    • ‘I apologize to Mr. Russell for ragging him but that's what happens when you have a rock garden named after you.’
  • 2Rebuke severely.

    • ‘If any male relative comes to the village after sunset, the women rag him and sometimes beat him up.’

noun

British
  • 1usually as modifier A program of stunts, parades, and other entertainments organized by students to raise money for charity.

    ‘rag week’
    • ‘Half the time they act like they are taking part in a university rag week.’
    • ‘You can't really win against a load of rag week stunts, can you?’
    • ‘Although in the past I know I have fully expressed my dislike for getting taken to school by my parents, during rag week we really had no choice.’
    • ‘A college which closed its bar during rag week last year has vowed to continue its clampdown on alcohol abuse.’
    • ‘The spectacle of seeing drunken teenage boys and girls falling on the streets early in the afternoon shocked many in Sligo during rag week.’
    • ‘Police have given permission for the march to take place although refused to let it begin from York Minster because of the University's student rag week.’
    • ‘He was among 1,000 students involved in the rag procession through the streets of Cheltenham on a Saturday morning.’
    • ‘The rag week, from February 8 to 16, is the main source of fundraising.’
    • ‘Nowhere, did I witness a promotion for soft drinks, sandwiches, soup etc. during rag week.’
    • ‘The Institute closed its bar during rag week last year and has developed a code of practice for all drinks-related activity on campus.’
    • ‘In rag week the college's Dome Bar was closed in an effort to encourage moderate alcohol drinking.’
    • ‘Three men who met as students had been singing university rag songs at the end of a day-long reunion when tragedy struck on a country lane, an inquest heard yesterday.’
    • ‘For the past eight decades or so, the Union has been housed in its distinctive premises at the bottom of University Avenue, regularly stormed by rival Strathclyde students on rag days.’
    • ‘It made me laugh, even though it had a kind of amateur, student rag week kind of feel to it.’
    • ‘We'd planned loads of entertainment in the bar right across rag week including comedians, bands and DJs.’
    • ‘He wasn't a med student collecting in the street for rag week.’
    • ‘The whole gang get kidnapped by students indulging in some sort of rag week prank.’
    fundraising event, charity event, charitable event, collection
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1dated, informal A boisterous prank or practical joke.

Phrasal Verbs

  • rag on

    • 1Complain about or criticize continually.

      • ‘He remembered his own father ragging on him about his hair and clothes.’
      • ‘I mean ever since I got here, you've just been ragging on me left and right.’
      • ‘I got a reasonably nice and thoughtful email from the guy I ragged on in my last post, although now I'm afraid to go to the site and read his ‘public’ reply.’
      • ‘You lie there defeated, ragging on yourself for the failure, mad at the judges because this can't be fair.’
      • ‘Any guy who rags on the color of your shoelaces is scary.’
      • ‘For example, my wife rags on me semi-constantly for not looking people directly in the eye when I'm introduced.’
      • ‘This guy is the meekest of mice, since he rags on a person he supposedly cares about.’
      • ‘‘Everyone rags on Baltimore, but I think it's a great city,’ says the sophomore from Rhode Island.’
      • ‘I hated to be late because Kristi used to rag on me when I kept her waiting.’
      • ‘Let her know you want her to quit ragging on you, pronto.’
    • 2Make fun of; tease constantly.

Origin

Mid 18th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

rag

/ræɡ//raɡ/

Main definitions of rag in English

: rag1rag2rag3rag4rag5

rag3

noun

  • A large, coarse roofing slate.

Origin

Late Middle English (in rag (sense 2 of the noun)): of unknown origin; later associated with rag.

Pronunciation

rag

/ræɡ//raɡ/

Main definitions of rag in English

: rag1rag2rag3rag4rag5

rag4

noun

  • A ragtime composition or tune.

    • ‘Each book contains ballads, blues, Latin pieces and rags.’
    • ‘Composed rags were widely published and became extremely popular among white amateur pianists, though it is likely that the black creators of ragtime would have played in a much freer manner than the written music suggests.’
    • ‘It definitely puts his performances of Scott Joplin's rags in a different light!’
    • ‘It is based on traditions of rag music and social protest lyrics.’

Origin

Late 19th century: perhaps from ragged; compare with ragtime.

Pronunciation

rag

/ræɡ//raɡ/

Main definitions of rag in English

: rag1rag2rag3rag4rag5

rag5

noun

Pronunciation

rag

/ræɡ//raɡ/