Definition of radicalize in English:

radicalize

(British radicalise)

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Cause (someone) to adopt radical positions on political or social issues.

    ‘I'm trying to mobilize and radicalize the liberals’
    • ‘That political process radicalised people and helped empower them.’
    • ‘And she was radicalized by attending Commonwealth College in Arkansas, an institution started by the organizers of the Southern Tenant Farmers' Union.’
    • ‘As it did for many, the Depression radicalized Miller.’
    • ‘Most impressive of all, perhaps, is evidence that the war is radicalising students out of the political apathy that has characterised them throughout the 90s.’
    • ‘But his years in prison changed him, radicalized him.’
    • ‘He went off to the US and what he saw radicalised him in ways that would change him.’
    • ‘We now know that our soldiers were as radicalized by the sixties as the college protesters.’
    • ‘Like so many of my generation, being on the anti-war demonstrations in the last couple of years has helped to radicalise me.’
    • ‘It's also easy to see how angry people radicalised by a lifetime of oppression might find a religion that provides outlet for their hate attractive.’
    • ‘Soon I was radicalized by the realization that the black pioneers and creators of this incomparable music were the systematic victims of appalling prejudice and discrimination.’
    • ‘His time in the Silver Valley, perhaps combined with his parents' unionism, radicalized him.’
    • ‘The murder of Malcolm X in 1965 radicalized Jones.’
    • ‘Nat Turner's rebellion radicalized opponents of slavery and provided a preview of the impending sectional crisis.’
    • ‘Still, the harassment further radicalized him against an institution he already despised.’
    • ‘The legal and electoral attacks on race-conscious affirmative action and the advent of other conservative public policies are said to be radicalizing scholars.’
    • ‘Workers and students were radicalized by the war in Vietnam.’
    • ‘This experience radicalised him and in 1839 he joined the Chartists.’
    • ‘That begins to radicalize people, whether it is farmers, or workers in the 1890s, or the millions of people who lost everything from nest eggs in banks to jobs during the Depression.’
    • ‘The episodes of violence here have radicalized some residents who have vowed revenge, residents said.’
    • ‘But like many Algerians, he was radicalized in 1991.’

Pronunciation

radicalize

/ˈradəkəˌlīz//ˈrædəkəˌlaɪz/