Definition of radiate in English:

radiate

verb

  • 1[with object] Emit (energy, especially light or heat) in the form of rays or waves.

    ‘the hot stars radiate energy’
    • ‘All matter radiates electromagnetic energy when it is heated.’
    • ‘If a particle moves faster than the speed of light, it must create a shockwave, and radiate energy.’
    • ‘These gases act like a blanket, trapping heat radiated by the Earth.’
    • ‘Aside from radiating heat into a building, dark roofing also radiates solar energy into the atmosphere.’
    • ‘If a source within such a material radiated light in many directions, the light would encounter a huge relative index when it emerged at a surface.’
    • ‘Why is that electrons radiate electromagnetic energy when they are accelerated?’
    • ‘Although new stars primarily radiate ultraviolet light, the dust they generate absorbs that light and re-emits it in the near-infrared.’
    • ‘Picture this: a screen is radiating a light that pours forth from an impenetrable blackness.’
    • ‘When the plant first blooms, the finger radiates heat, which sends out strong aromas.’
    • ‘Although its name would imply that it radiates heat, the radiator actually dissipates the coolant's heat not by radiation but by convection.’
    • ‘It was late at night and the stars and moon had entered the sky, radiating the eerie light onto abandoned walkways and rat infested ally ways.’
    • ‘She dipped the golden leaf into the water and when she lifted it out, it was glowing, radiating golden rays of light.’
    • ‘The panels are connected to copper pipes that carry hot water, which radiates heat down from the panels to warm the area below.’
    • ‘Because the most energetic electrons in the bridge radiate their energy the fastest, their intensity acts as a clock, indicating how long ago the galactic collision took place.’
    • ‘Any material object at a temperature above absolute zero radiates energy.’
    • ‘At each groove, plasmons scatter and radiate some light, while some plasmon energy remains to travel to the next groove.’
    • ‘An electron orbiting in one of these ‘allowed’ orbits has a defined energy state, does not radiate energy, and does not spiral into the nucleus.’
    • ‘Moreover, the effects of these waves have been seen: Two stars orbiting each other radiate gravitational waves.’
    • ‘The sphere grew larger and began to radiate a hazy light.’
    • ‘The lower atmosphere of Venus radiates heat at this wavelength.’
    emit, give off, give out, send forth, send out, discharge, scatter, diffuse
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object](of light, heat, or other energy) be emitted in the form of rays or waves.
      ‘the continual stream of energy that radiates from the sun’
      • ‘It's heat radiated out and warmed up Carina's cold hands.’
      • ‘Heat was radiating off the roofing and I wanted nothing more than to scream, but my throat was too dry.’
      • ‘Even though it was around five in the afternoon, heat was still radiating off the pavement and by the time I got home about ten minutes later, I was already drenched in sweat.’
      • ‘In time, the energy radiates out of the cup and it cools.’
      • ‘Such a heating system, called radiant heat because the heat radiates up off the floor, relied on hot water piped through copper tubing installed beneath the tiles.’
      • ‘From within the enclosure a warm illumination radiated.’
      • ‘The large white cylindrical node lay on the grass with the heat radiating off the metal covering distorting the air around it.’
      • ‘Light radiated through the gorgeous stained glass of medieval cathedrals and glimmered in arcaded loggias.’
      • ‘The gas probably ignited from the heat radiating off the fire or from an electrical spark.’
      • ‘Heat radiated and reflected around him and he took off his shirt to cool himself.’
      • ‘It was then that Calida spotted the flickering light of a fire radiating around the doorway to her right.’
      • ‘The heat radiated off the surface of the granite and onto me.’
      • ‘The heat radiates up through the floor, being transferred to and absorbed by the different objects in the room.’
      • ‘The lights radiated around it, clearly visible against the black backdrop of night.’
      • ‘The air in the field became warm and comforting, the light becoming so bright that you could feel the heat radiating.’
      • ‘As the wood burns, chemical potential energy becomes kinetic energy like heat which can presumably radiate out of the fixed area of space you defined in your question.’
      • ‘I leant my head against it, expecting to feel heat radiate through it, or pick up muffled sounds.’
      • ‘In excited atoms, energy radiated as photons eventually leaks into the vast interstellar spaces and redshifts away.’
      • ‘Jade carefully slipped in another log and felt the heat radiate.’
      • ‘After sunset, the heat radiates upward, lowering temperatures near the ground.’
    2. 1.2(of a person) clearly emanate (a strong feeling or quality) through their expression or bearing.
      ‘she lifted her chin, radiating defiance’
      • ‘Her expression radiated happiness that instantly gave me peace.’
      • ‘Greg never could put his finger on it, but she just radiated a good feeling and friendship when she was near.’
      • ‘You are a romantic and affectionate person who can radiate passion - whether for certain ideas or for matters of love, too.’
      • ‘In his yellow waistcoat, he simply radiated warmth as he gave a cheerful greeting to everybody he met.’
      • ‘Having met some of his patients who have been given a new lease of life with replacement intra-ocular lenses, they simply radiate happiness.’
      • ‘And as you can see, I'm positively radiating contentment…’
      • ‘Garrulous, passionate and good-humoured, 35-year-old Khan is an immediately engaging personality who radiates confidence.’
      • ‘A fine figure of a man, he radiates masculine self-assurance, a quality that interested the Queen greatly.’
      • ‘Ann radiates determination, she is on a mission.’
      • ‘By far the person radiating the most resentment and enmity was Will.’
      • ‘Lee radiates well-intentioned niceness, which is no replacement for stage presence or good material.’
      • ‘Only this actor of old school star power can radiate any energy within the limited confines of his underwritten role.’
      • ‘Through the meditation practice, it is possible to develop a situation of friendship with yourself, from which you can radiate friendship towards others.’
      • ‘The man radiated confidence, and his calm was re-assuring, even for Vatch.’
      • ‘Even now, lonely, hurt and alone, you still radiate happiness.’
      • ‘He was red in the face and he was practically radiating anger and hurt.’
      • ‘Helen simply radiates happiness and there is a great sense of satisfaction and self-ease about her.’
      • ‘I knew exactly what was wrong - I was radiating a sort of pessimism and gloom that was clearly undermining their confidence.’
      • ‘The chorus of sailors and passengers radiates sunny bonhomie, singing and dancing crisply.’
      • ‘When Macbeth is hunched over, scrawny and half bald he does not radiate a sinister charisma.’
    3. 1.3(of a feeling or quality) emanate clearly from.
      ‘leadership and confidence radiate from her’
      • ‘His love for his family and his native home radiated from his gentle heart.’
      • ‘She was quiet, the depression and despair radiating from her body in a way that was painful just to be near.’
      • ‘High emotion radiates from these wonderful pieces of artwork.’
      • ‘There was a quality about her that made you feel good and her lovely nature radiated from her heart like sunshine.’
      • ‘Efficency and purpose radiated from her barely five-foot frame as she barked at Mum to open the boot.’
      • ‘It might have also been caused by the sheer joy and mutual affection that radiated from all four musicians.’
      • ‘Even though I could not see his eyes, I could feel the anger radiating from them across the carriage.’
      • ‘He has continued to press calmly forward despite almost deranged hatred radiating from enemies.’
      • ‘Happiness always radiated from his genuine smile.’
      • ‘What really startled him was the rage he could feel radiating from her.’
      • ‘When his father was satisfied with a job, Lasdun recalls, a tremendous joy radiated from him.’
      • ‘She had a vibrant energy for life and people that radiated from her and she drew people into her world.’
      • ‘There was a reassuring air about him, a comforting quality that he seemed to radiate from within.’
      • ‘It just felt like there was something radiating from him, peace or something.’
      • ‘There was a serene and tranquil quality about Dermot, a gentle aura of goodness and kindness that radiated from his heart.’
      • ‘He had very, very compassionate eyes and a love radiated from the man.’
      • ‘Rae detected a hint of boredom radiating from the woman's voice.’
      • ‘The bride bared her teeth in a rough approximation of a smile; fear radiated from her eyes.’
      • ‘Anger and frustration radiate from a man who rarely had faced cause to be angry or frustrated, and he is almost confused by the situation.’
      • ‘It was a test of the good humour that radiated from him that this didn't become boring.’
  • 2[no object] Diverge or spread from or as if from a central point.

    ‘he ran down one of the passages that radiated from the room’
    • ‘Back Streets - One of Kingston's charms during the day is the back streets and alleyways that radiate from the Market Place.’
    • ‘His winning design for the £200m extension features a sliced tomato, the flesh radiating from the centre.’
    • ‘The building has an original design, with a central administrative section, and radiating out from this, the elementary school building, the high-school building and the gym.’
    • ‘Misty and complex at the centre, with great straight streaks radiating from it, some of them all the way to the horizon.’
    • ‘The beautiful purple petals that radiate from its dark cone-shaped centre somewhat resemble the commonly grown black-eyed Susan.’
    • ‘This is the town centre, the spine of which is High Street, offering the usual array of newsagents, electricians, banks, shoe shops, and tea rooms, with original dwelling places radiating out from it.’
    • ‘Mendieta's legacy seems to ripple outward like circles of waves radiating from a stone cast in the water.’
    • ‘The volumes are arranged in a vaguely cruciform plan, with wings radiating out from a central core.’
    • ‘The primary unit consists of four to seven primary rods radiating from one perpendicular primary spine.’
    • ‘ASR is a chemical reaction which can occur in the concrete of a building resulting in cracks radiating from the interior.’
    • ‘In a 1990 piece, roses with long, spindly stems are placed to form a sunburst, their blossoms defining a central spiral and their stems radiating outward.’
    • ‘This is a magnificent top, the hub of four sinewy ridges that radiate from the summit to form the apex of five huge corries.’
    • ‘The other is Palmaria palmata, or Dulse, a red-brown seaweed with fronds radiating from a central disc.’
    • ‘I was back recently to the Round Room under the heavy drum of the central rotunda from which the Four Courts radiate.’
    • ‘These green wedges of land and water started well outside the city and narrowed as they grew closer, separated by transportation routes radiating out from Stockholm.’
    • ‘There were six tables in the laboratory, with five of the tables radiating out in a star-pattern from a sixth central table.’
    • ‘In each drum, the circular plans minimize circulation to a small hall in the middle, from where individual student rooms radiate as wedges.’
    • ‘For centuries, all the routes into Waterford city were radial, like spokes radiating from the hub of a bicycle wheel.’
    • ‘They feature a central core, with a number of rippled fins radiating out from the center.’
    • ‘This docking pod is at the end of one of the station's long habitation arms, which radiate from a central hub with a glass roof, through which you can observe the universe.’
    spread out, branch, branch off, branch out, diverge, extend, separate, split off, issue
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Biology
      (of an animal or plant group) evolve into a variety of forms adapted to new situations or ways of life.
      • ‘After the end of the Cretaceous, the birds and mammals radiated strongly for about another 10-20 million years.’
      • ‘Each of these lineages radiated separately, with genus succeeding genus for the 10-20 million years of this era.’
      • ‘In any case, these animals quickly radiated into an extraordinary variety of large and small terrestrial herbivores and carnivores.’
      • ‘During this time, the mammals radiated and evolved, but they could not make the breakthrough to becoming large or to diversifying their modes of like.’
      • ‘From there, the species has radiated into several subspecies, two of which occur in Europe and share a hybrid zone.’

adjective

rare
  • Having rays or parts proceeding from a center; arranged in or having a radial pattern.

    ‘the radiate crown’
    • ‘Cronos glared up into the tree of life's radiate rainbow colored leaves.’
    • ‘The flowers of the outer whorl of the head generally have five elongated petals united to form straplike structures and are restricted to the periphery of the radiate head.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin radiat- emitted in rays from the verb radiare, from radius ray, spoke.

Pronunciation:

radiate

/ˈrādēˌāt/