Definition of quick in US English:

quick

adjective

  • 1Moving fast or doing something in a short time.

    with infinitive ‘he was always quick to point out her faults’
    ‘some children are particularly quick learners’
    ‘I was much quicker than he was and held him at bay for several laps’
    • ‘They are a fine team with very fast and quick forwards and they are pressing for the top place in the group and if they beat us they will do that.’
    • ‘This is not to say that problems do not occur, though eBay is quick to state that any such happenings are few and far between.’
    • ‘They can even catch a bird in free flight, so that's how quick they are.’
    • ‘The city was saddened by the news of Terry's closure and readers were quick to suggest alternative uses for the factory site.’
    • ‘With electric gates which can be operated from either end of the pit cows make a quick entry and a fast exit.’
    • ‘Mathias was a quick learner, in just a short time he could perform the kicks satisfactorily.’
    • ‘Keep the defence tight, and when on offence, I want to see quick feet and fast passing.’
    • ‘Mrs Young said the secret of her success behind the bar was quick mental arithmetic which helped her to keep track of the orders without the help of a cash till.’
    • ‘To both her credit and her detriment, Nora has learned to not be quick to judge people.’
    • ‘We've got excellent linebackers because of the speed there, and we're fast and quick up front.’
    • ‘And they were also quick to slam high-spending pop stars and other celebrities who they said were a bad example to youngsters.’
    • ‘I am easily provoked, and rather vicious when my toe is stepped on, but I'm quick to cool down and fast to reasoning.’
    • ‘Despite a two-and-a-half hour rain delay, Williams was quick off the blocks, racing to a 4-lead in the first set.’
    • ‘While being quick and fast, those involved in the relief and rescue work should maintain their temper, he noted.’
    • ‘Other nations were quick to emulate Ecuador's experiment, but few have enjoyed the same success.’
    • ‘Best wishes to Eilish Marren who sustained a broken ankle recently and we wish her a speedy recovery and a quick return to the playing field.’
    • ‘If you suffer from either type of sinusitis, our quick fixes offer fast relief.’
    • ‘You take swift decisions and make quick changes when situations are tense and demanding.’
    • ‘They also need to be quick on their feet and incredibly alert and aware.’
    • ‘Another aspect of Swedish business success is that the country's firms are quick to recut their cloth to suit changing times.’
    fast, swift, rapid, speedy, high-speed, expeditious
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    1. 1.1 Lasting or taking a short time.
      ‘we went to the pub for a quick drink’
      ‘she took a quick look through the drawers’
      • ‘These quick tender biscuits go with just about any prairie meal.’
      • ‘A quick test shows this happens with enough browsers to make it funny (I didn't find one that worked).’
      • ‘Meticulous copy editing may be another impediment to the quick dissemination of results.’
      • ‘There are no quick fixes for the grief and anguish after the death of a loved one.’
      • ‘The set was two and a half hours of music with a twenty-minute interval for drinks and some quick reprogramming of the lights and video projectors.’
      • ‘We were supposed to be having ‘a quick drink’, but it ended up being dinner for about eight and the bar actually ran out of wine.’
      • ‘But a quick word with the proprietor of the local service station reassured me otherwise.’
      • ‘The Orkney squad lost three quick tries at the start of the game, resulting in a half-time score of 22-5.’
      • ‘As the room swirled and tumbled around him, Fleet caught only a few quick glimpses of what happened next.’
      • ‘So we will take a quick look at Pi Fast, which, as the name suggests calculates Pi to as many digits as you want.’
      • ‘They're relatively simple and quick quests that result in very little gain in terms of experience points.’
      • ‘She had made just two quick trips home to Indianapolis during that time.’
      • ‘After landing aboard the ship, we board a fast speed boat for the quick ride to the terminal.’
      • ‘Bails was tired but met for a quick drink after work.’
      • ‘She headed for the cyber café to do a quick search and learn a thing or two.’
      • ‘Nosing into the wave, called purling, will usually result in your quick exit from the board.’
      • ‘Rearranging the gallery is one way to stay busy, and one that can result in quick sales.’
      • ‘Finally, a quick look at what happened in Scotland in April.’
      • ‘However, a succession of penalty corners from Aldridge resulted in two quick goals and suddenly the game was slipping away again.’
      • ‘Before looking at the results, let's do a quick recap on what happens in the formation of an embryo.’
      hasty, hurried, cursory, perfunctory, superficial, desultory, incidental, summary, glancing
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Happening with little or no delay; prompt.
      ‘children like to see quick results from their efforts’
      • ‘His military skills resulted in quick promotion in Carranza's constitutional army.’
      • ‘She instead gives the reader quick snapshots as fast as the events she describes.’
      • ‘I still think the basic motivation behind this is valid, but the result personally is a quick burnout.’
      • ‘A quick response by police resulted in the swift arrest of two youths.’
      • ‘However if we want a quick result on a short session they are ideal.’
      • ‘Materials are sold off to earn a quick Kwacha and the result is people continue wallow in poverty.’
      • ‘A skin test is usually done first because it is quick and straightforward.’
      • ‘It is seen as the least dangerous of the notorious cobra family but its bite can still cause rapid death without quick intervention.’
      • ‘They began to price land and they began to open up for investments and for trade, which led to quick results.’
      • ‘When an accident happens a quick response may be necessary to keep an injury from becoming a fatality.’
      • ‘Pests should be controlled with a quick shot to the head or fast acting poison.’
      • ‘With its simple colour scheme and one page layout it is designed for fast downloading and quick access to new material.’
      • ‘Low-intensity warfare of this kind does not bring quick results and much of the work is low-key, repetitive and painstaking.’
      • ‘Women tend to want quick results if they're working alone, and they are more likely to give up in a few weeks if they don't see real progress.’
      • ‘Part of the myth is that it's easy, quick, fast money, but there are always strings attached.’
      • ‘Remember these fish are fast and spooky, you have to make quick accurate casts, often into a twenty knot wind.’
      • ‘The result is quick response both around town and on the open road, plus levels of fuel efficiency and economy that rate at the top of the class.’
      • ‘My business would not offer a return for several years, whereas Bob was promising a relatively quick buck.’
      • ‘Four children, three boys and a girl, were born in fairly quick succession.’
      • ‘It looks like the new fast track to quick money is being a test user.’
      sudden, instantaneous, immediate, instant, abrupt, sharp, precipitate, breakneck, headlong
      View synonyms
  • 2(of a person) prompt to understand, think, or learn; intelligent.

    ‘it was quick of him to spot the mistake’
    • ‘Joseph early in life learned that quick wit would get him through.’
    • ‘So, being quick and bright, she explains that she meant ‘hard-working people’.’
    • ‘‘He's pretty quick on the uptake,’ she replied.’
    • ‘However, their quick wits and intelligence often brings them through, and they may make a fortune from nothing.’
    • ‘Endowed with a keen sense of perception, they also have quick minds.’
    • ‘Jo was clever, cunning, intelligent, very quick, and could see things which other people couldn't.’
    • ‘In college, my quick wit and intelligence made up for whatever I lacked in dedication.’
    • ‘Even with her intelligent and quick mind, she could come up with no way of getting to her dagger.’
    • ‘‘Why?’ David asked, sounding a bit stupid, for his usually quick intellect was a bit slowed by the recent events.’
    • ‘He is a pioneer with an astute intellect and has a quick wit.’
    • ‘He was a terrific actor and he also had a very quick brain.’
    • ‘You realise professional goals with intelligence, quick thinking and good management.’
    • ‘His brilliant blue eyes always twinkled brightly, he was smart and a quick thinker.’
    • ‘But in private, it was clear that this guy was very smart, very quick to learn.’
    • ‘He is able to use his wit, he's able to use his quick thinking in very sharp and tactically, even brilliant, ways.’
    • ‘With its quick intelligence, it has no trouble learning its name and how to use a litter box.’
    • ‘I am quick to learn, and incredibly hard working, but I'm a bit of a loner and would need a competent team for support.’
    • ‘A quick student, she memorised entire scripts and soon learned how to cry or laugh on command.’
    • ‘Andy Reid is a marvellous player; skilful, intelligent, and quick in thought and action.’
    • ‘He was quick to learn and was literate in both English and Irish and had a good understanding of the Brehan law.’
    intelligent, bright, clever, gifted, able, brilliant, astute, quick-witted, sharp-witted, ready, quick off the mark
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 (of a person's eye or ear) keenly perceptive; alert.
      • ‘She was about to say something but her quick eyes had caught the mass of women slowly stalking toward them.’
      • ‘He signaled secretly to his gang, but the cold man's quick eye caught everything.’
      • ‘Other worthies pilloried him for his strokeplay, dismissing the values of strength and quick eye in favour of grace and beauty.’
      • ‘The bounce was even and true, and Agarkar, with his quick eye, could do no wrong under such circumstances.’
      • ‘Possessing a quick eye, and sly about it, they never let slip an opportunity or an advantage when it comes their way.’
      • ‘Sherlock Holmes's quick eye took in my occupation, and he shook his head with a smile as he noticed my questioning glances.’
      • ‘Making money in this segment will require careful management and a quick eye on micro-trends.’
      • ‘Her bearing has turned to reserve, her normally quick eyes dull and watery.’
      • ‘Blaze sat looking out the window for some time, her quick eyes darting along the part of the street she could see from the window.’
      • ‘Ivan Denisovich's quick eye allows him to cut in front of another prisoner for a serving tray.’
    2. 2.2 (of a person's temper) easily roused.
      • ‘I have a quick temper which can flare up and be over in seconds, which makes me rueful, but at least provides bystanders with entertainment.’
      • ‘Mary, who never received any domestic training from her mother at home, marries Jack, a business executive with a quick temper.’
      • ‘Contrary to popular belief, Marla did not have a quick temper, she was simply angry all the time.’
      • ‘They know her and her flaws - a quick temper, a dicey sexual past - too well for that.’
      • ‘Normally, he was quite calm and quiet, but he had a quick temper that subsided as easily as it came.’
      • ‘Helena had a quick temper but rarely flew into a true rage.’
      • ‘In this novel, Beverly Lamark is a successful mystery writer with a quick temper and acerbic wit.’
      • ‘The defence say that the defendant is a peaceable, non-violent man, who did not have a quick temper.’
      • ‘Troy Stevenson, a murderer, was formerly a big man in the drug business with a quick temper and a bigger attitude.’
      • ‘To her finer qualities must be added a quick temper and considerable hauteur, more readily apparent to the Chinese than to most foreigners.’
      • ‘He was replaced by Frank Joklik, a former mine boss with a quick temper.’
      • ‘I had a quick temper, and my way of controlling it was to avoid responding or talking to people.’
      • ‘You can be rather selfish, though, and a partner needs to be able to deal with your quick temper and impulsive tantrums.’
      • ‘Her mother, for instance, with her high blood pressure, her quick temper, is obviously choleric.’
      • ‘He was in trouble for vandalism and had a notoriously quick temper.’
      • ‘Now I realized that it was his cold anger that I feared, and not his quick temper.’
      • ‘Denise has little concept of humility, and allows her quick temper to interfere with her common sense.’
      • ‘Age and size are a bad mix, and Brown has a quick temper and slow feet to boot.’
      • ‘Some of his prickliness was an expression of offended authority, but much of it also had to do with his own quick temper.’
      • ‘If one trusts the cuttings - there are tales of files being thrown at unfortunate juniors - Stevens has a quick temper.’

adverb

informal
  • At a fast rate; quickly.

    ‘he'll find some place where he can make money quicker’
    as exclamation ‘Get out, quick!’
    • ‘This promises to be an uplifting and exciting concert, but tickets will sell fast so get in quick.’
    • ‘One word: grow up quick or seek therapy as soon as possible.’
    • ‘How quick we have forgotten the sacrifice demanded of those whose homes and communities that stood in the way of the inner relief folly.’
    • ‘Watching my mum being a single parent made me grow up quick and taught me to not rush things in life.’
    • ‘I have to admit that I don't learn new things as quick as I do 10 years ago.’
    • ‘People don't realise how critical that is because if you come in and something's not quite right you get exposed real quick, as you can see with the newer guys.’
    • ‘And it is that a company can play quick and fast with procedural rules, and escape action.’
    • ‘Exxon and Shell say if we don't do something quick the 2004 convention sponsorship deal is off.’
    • ‘I adapted pretty quick to it so it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be.’
    • ‘Her heart beat quick as she ran into the office and lifted the shade to witness the flood.’
    • ‘So get your ducks quick as they are flying out of the place.’
    • ‘The world was a blur around us and if I tried to focus outside the circle of movement, I got a headache pretty quick.’
    • ‘The smart lines drop in fast and quick, with some great gags that click two seconds after you think they should.’
    • ‘"I thought to myself I could have held a little more depth and got there a bit quicker.’
    • ‘I'd like to point out - most people are talking about how quick you need to do this.’
    • ‘' Since then I've started swinging the ball away and got a bit quicker as well.’
    • ‘But trading standards staff are warning that there is no guarantee of getting rich quick or even getting your original stake back.’
    • ‘When he drew it back real quick he stabbed himself in the neck with it.’
    • ‘I got away quick, which was down to the nerves, the aggression, the excitement and the adrenalin.’
    • ‘It would take off real quick in a straight line, then seem to turn 90 degrees, then up and down and left and right.’

noun

  • 1the quickThe soft tender flesh below the growing part of a fingernail or toenail.

    • ‘If you cut into the quick, the claw will bleed and the cat will experience pain.’
    • ‘I am at this moment being vetted for my suitability as interviewer and my nails are bitten to the quick.’
    • ‘It doesn't exactly hurt when they dig but it is uncomfortable like when you chew a nail down to the quick.’
    • ‘As she packed, I saw her hands and her once beautiful nails were bitten to the quick.’
    • ‘You'll enjoy the movie if your idea of a good time is sitting glued to the edge of your seat chewing your fingernails down to the quick.’
    • ‘I removed my hand from my mouth when I realized I had chewed my fingernail down to the bleeding quick.’
    • ‘This will prevent the quick from growing too long and prevent the nail from bleeding.’
    • ‘And all from a little British film, with a tiny £2 million budget which was cut to the quick.’
    • ‘Their hands were inspected, nails cut to the quick if polish was found.’
    • ‘All over Britain, parental nails are being chewed down to the quick.’
    • ‘The water will help soften the baby's toenails so they trim easily and without snapping off at the quick.’
    1. 1.1 The central or most sensitive part of someone or something.
      • ‘It cuts to straight to the quick of this most sinister tale, using just two actors on a bare stage to tell of a man divided and torn between his good and evil nature.’
      • ‘This seemingly ‘technical’ issue in many ways cuts to the quick of electronic nonlinearity.’
      • ‘Its implications cut to the quick of the British constitution.’
      • ‘Stung to the quick by allegations our banner graphic looked very 1994, we've done a bit of a redesign here.’
      • ‘The vote or die campaign that was launched by young Afro and white Americans stung the heartland of America to the quick.’
      • ‘Finally someone's cutting right to the quick of a very important subject that's all too often ignored.’
      • ‘I didn't agree with the statement, but I did think it clever and amusing, cutting to the quick of what a particular type of web usage is all about.’
      • ‘It neutralises the whining about failing to address the issue because it cuts to the quick.’
      • ‘The PRSI changes cut to the quick of a constituency that she and her party hold dear.’
      • ‘Stoll is a clean, clear writer, and his short dispatches cut to the quick.’
  • 2as plural noun the quickarchaic Those who are living.

    ‘the quick and the dead’
    • ‘They will die as you died, in the footsteps of the dead that were quick.’
    • ‘This law renders willful killing of an unborn ‘quick’ child by any injury to the mother of the child to be manslaughter.’
    • ‘From the salvation of the dead we move to the healing of the quick.’

Phrases

  • cut someone to the quick

    • Cause someone deep distress by a hurtful remark or action.

      • ‘But when she opened The Independent the other day, she was cut to the quick.’
      • ‘I was about to open my mouth to say something but he cut me to the quick.’
      • ‘Hearing the answer either way would likely cut him to the quick.’
      • ‘She brushes past him, her heart pounding with the effort it took to keep from blurting out something about Daphne that would really cut him to the quick.’
      • ‘Many of Billington's criticisms have clearly cut Nunn to the quick.’
      • ‘If there was one thing Joe Cartwright couldn't take it was being ignored, and if the townspeople had set out to cut him to the quick then they had certainly done a good job of it.’
      • ‘His words cut her to the quick, but this time she knew exactly why.’
      • ‘‘I understand,’ Jack tried, but this girl cut him to the quick.’
      • ‘The mocking tone was slight, but it cut Maple to the quick.’
      • ‘Gleason's flamboyancy would have cut Buk to the quick.’
      hurt, hurt the feelings of, scar, damage, harm, injure, insult, slight, offend, give offence to, affront, distress, disturb, upset, make miserable, trouble, discomfort
      View synonyms
  • quick with child

    • archaic At a stage of pregnancy when movements of the fetus have been felt.

      • ‘A woman is usually considered to be ‘quick‘with child around the fourth month of pregnancy.’
      • ‘By the present Law, this offence is divided into two classes: the capital offence being where the woman shall be quick with child.’
      • ‘In the criminal context, women convicted of capital crimes were permitted to plead that they were quick with child, and to have this claim tested by a group of six women.’

Origin

Old English cwic, cwicu ‘alive, animated, alert’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch kwiek ‘sprightly’ and German keck ‘saucy’, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin vivus ‘alive’ and Greek bios, zōē ‘life’.

Pronunciation

quick

/kwik//kwɪk/