Main definitions of quarry in English

: quarry1quarry2quarry3

quarry1

noun

  • A place, typically a large, deep pit, from which stone or other materials are or have been extracted.

    • ‘The whole philosophy of a stone quarry is to leverage out a wholesome material, free of cracks and other faults.’
    • ‘Gravel pits, marl pits and stone quarries were also an early source of freight tonnage as was cement.’
    • ‘The materials extracted from the quarries - used widely in the local building industry - contained large quantities of fibrous amphiboles.’
    • ‘He said: ‘We are only importing material into the quarry to restore it.’’
    • ‘Further uphill is the planter's house, transformed into an interpretation centre built on the remains of a stone quarry discovered in 1966.’
    • ‘The materials extracted from the quarries contain large quantities of fibrous amphiboles; these materials are used widely in the local building industry.’
    • ‘Stancliffe Stone wants to re-open the quarries to extract the high-quality sandstone they contain.’
    • ‘The owner objected that he was there first, indeed that stone from his quarry had built the foundations of the houses.’
    • ‘The locality was described then as ‘being too rugged and is a quarry for a fine stone similar to that of Portland; there are also limestone quarries and a slate quarry’.’
    • ‘The operators want to dig deeper seams within the quarry - up to 15 metres below the existing level.’
    • ‘It's a deep gorge carved out years ago to drain the limestone quarry into Lake Michigan.’
    • ‘In recent years the area surrounding the original mine has been developed as a quarry for crushed stone.’
    • ‘Two stones at the quarry in 1884 weighed eighteen tons each.’
    • ‘The Castle's gardens lie in a dramatic ravine which was once a quarry, and are particularly pretty in autumn.’
    • ‘By day he was working in a limestone quarry, carrying buckets of stones on a yoke.’
    • ‘Tarmac Northern Limted, which owns the quarry near Helwith Bridge, is seeking planning permission to extend its workings to the west of the existing site.’
    • ‘However, none of the stone taken from a quarry near Tadcaster used to construct Clifford's Tower has ever contained iron oxide.’
    • ‘The haul road will be used to ferry materials from the quarry to the beach for the construction of the breakwaters and related marine infrastructure.’
    • ‘Three years after an Environment Court judge ordered a Pauatahanui quarry closed its owners are seeking to reopen it.’
    • ‘He was a crack skier and mountaineer, whose strength had been built up breaking up stones in a limestone quarry during the war.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Extract (stone or other materials) from a quarry.

    • ‘Although it has been over 40 years since developers first wanted to quarry stone in the area, the sage of the superquarry began in 1991.’
    • ‘Consequently, the foundation stone was quarried in Deadwood, and the sandstone for the walls came from nearby Hot Springs.’
    • ‘As part of these efforts, prisoners dug sand for mortar, quarried building stone and mortar lime, and manufactured more than 1.2 million bricks.’
    • ‘It is clear that Wilfred's builders made no effort to quarry fresh stone for this edifice.’
    • ‘When a stone is quarried using dynamite, the molecular structure is shattered, making the stone weak and destroying its life and sound.’
    • ‘Starting in the mid-fifteenth century, the decorative stone serpentine was quarried in many small mines in Zoblitz, near Marienberg in Saxony.’
    • ‘The Chichén Itzá site is dotted with excavations, presumably locations where limestone was quarried for the various structures.’
    • ‘We know that this metal was being quarried from the Mendips as early as 49, while extraction from the Flintshire mines of North Wales had begun by 74, and from Yorkshire by 81.’
    • ‘Lime was quarried in Rockland and shipped by rail to distant points, but this was an industry in decline.’
    • ‘Glass can be recycled indefinitely, helping the environment by reducing the amount of raw materials being quarried from the countryside, saving energy and helping to reduce global warming.’
    • ‘The original stone was quarried in Mount Leinster and constructed in 1839.’
    • ‘This is the largest stone ever quarried by man - nothing near its size exists in Greece, in the pyramids, or in Manhattan.’
    • ‘The large blocks of relatively soft limestone could be quarried with hard stone tools.’
    • ‘This was why stone was not quarried in weather below twenty-two degrees Fahrenheit.’
    • ‘The mottled gray marble was probably quarried at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania; the mantels in the less formal rooms are wooden.’
    • ‘The characteristic solid grey limestone was quarried from the east face of the Rock of Gibraltar as well as being shipped across from a Spanish quarry outside Algeciras.’
    • ‘The basalt lava in particular has been, and is still being, extensively quarried for road aggregate in many large quarries on those mountains.’
    • ‘In 1992, the height of the obsidian ‘rush’, seven companies were quarrying the stone in the area.’
    • ‘‘We used a base material that is quarried on the island, cement stabilised it and added an emulsion layer to bind the layers of material together,’ he said.’
    • ‘The stone was quarried 30 miles away in Kilkenny and crafted in Stradbally, with much of the work being done by past pupils of Scoil Mhuire Fatima.’
    • ‘In fact, Liston says he felt relieved when his team discovered the fish's tail section was missing, having been quarried out during clay extraction work in the late 1980s.’
    • ‘Manor Stone is quarried on the land beside the Centre.’
    1. 1.1 Cut into (rock or ground) to obtain stone or other materials.
      • ‘A central aim of the book is to explore what is Venetian about the Venetian domestic environment and its furnishings, and this calls for the extensive quarrying and analysis of textual materials.’
      • ‘‘They raised the concern that the quantity and quality of groundwater may be affected by quarrying activities,’ he said.’
      • ‘These volumes have been quarried by historians for decades for ‘shocking truths’ of ‘intolerable conditions’ of filth and depravity in early industrial towns.’
      • ‘Protesters stood in groups below the towering tree-houses in the remote wooded area, talking about the death and continuing to express their determination to stop the hillside being quarried.’
      • ‘The long-running saga of whether quarrying is to be permitted at an historic Peak District beauty spot is set for a final showdown.’
      • ‘At a significantly later date the rock dome was quarried, and some of the phase 1 carvings were broken through.’
      • ‘The Chalk is, in its lower part, extensively quarried for cement.’
      • ‘Inside the pyramid Zozers burial chamber was quarried 25 meters below out of the rock beneath it.’
      • ‘He quarried major histories, previous biographical collections, and standard handbooks and directories.’
      • ‘The powdered basalt, granite and other volcanic rock is a by-product of quarrying and hundreds of thousands of tonnes of the material is lying unused around Scotland.’
      • ‘Morris kept a detailed diary, which French and American historians have quarried ever since portions of it were first published in 1832.’
      • ‘If the extension is granted the area which is quarried will remain the same with no horizontal expansion or deepening beyond the existing permitted level.’
      • ‘As quarrying expanded, it slowly encroached upon the Old Burial Ground, established by the Legislature in 1712.’
      • ‘The idea of mining Paritutu's bones was shelved, and quarrying continued at Fishing Rock.’
      • ‘The scar created by quarrying the hillside is visible from a wide area, but working of the scar face is now completed and progress is being made below the level of surrounding land.’
      • ‘On May Hill, earthworks tell of a long history including quarrying, charcoal burning and grazing.’
      • ‘Heritage Action say science still cannot answer many of the questions about the earthworks, and they want a moratorium on quarrying near historic sites, until methods improve.’
      • ‘At Endcliffe and Lees Cross near Stanton Moor and its Bronze Age monument The Nine Ladies, eco-warriors have dug a series of tunnels in a four-year campaign to prevent quarrying.’
      • ‘Extensive quarrying in Byzantine times has removed all evidence of earlier levels here, but topographically a main entrance into the temenos on Temple Hill in antiquity on this side makes the most sense.’
      • ‘The debate over the extension of quarrying close to the three Thornborough Henges - one of Britain's most important Neolithic sites - continues at a public meeting on Wednesday.’

Origin

Middle English: from a variant of medieval Latin quareria, from Old French quarriere, based on Latin quadrum ‘a square’. The verb dates from the late 18th century.

Pronunciation

Main definitions of quarry in English

: quarry1quarry2quarry3

quarry2

noun

  • 1An animal pursued by a hunter, hound, predatory mammal, or bird of prey.

    • ‘Pike fishing is a sport which attracts growing numbers of anglers, who pursue their quarry with a grim determination and will travel hundreds of miles to catch a record-sized fish.’
    • ‘Yet, that's about how long falconry - the sport of flying birds of prey at wild quarry - has been around.’
    • ‘Secondly, a fox is not a recognised quarry for a bird of prey.’
    • ‘The final gunshot strands the hunter and his quarry on opposing sides of mortality.’
    • ‘The ethical basis of all field sports is the same, be it hunting, shooting or fishing, in each case the quarry will be edible or a pest or perhaps, both.’
    • ‘Hunters, unlike their quarry, have been slow to adapt to the new conditions.’
    • ‘In Drag Hunting, a pack of hounds follows a scent laid by a human rather than pursuing a live quarry.’
    • ‘At first the breed was known as the Lhasa terrier, though it is not and never was an earth dog, i.e., one that pursues its quarry underground.’
    • ‘They had the ability to remorselessly pursue their quarry at a relentless pace, regardless of the mid-day sun.’
    • ‘Thus the bracketing of hull and basketwork trap also instils notions of the fisherman and his catch, the hunter and his quarry, the slayer and the slain.’
    • ‘Shown in cave paintings in France and Spain, these were a favourite quarry of Palaeolithic hunters, and were eventually hunted to extinction.’
    • ‘Judging by the behaviour of birds, monkeys and deer, our quarry was certainly out there, probably sitting in the long grass and smiling to himself at human folly.’
    • ‘That behavior really is an act, since the animal is easy quarry.’
    • ‘Yet, he was a skilled bear killer, and the shared proficiency of hunter and quarry added another level of compulsion to the stories.’
    • ‘Numerous small packs of hounds were kept by people in all walks of life, as they rambled through the countryside pursuing their quarry.’
    • ‘Moreover, hunting is not a natural encounter between predator and quarry because, unlike animals, humans are responsible for their actions.’
    • ‘One North Dakota émigré actually ‘rode the hounds’ with wolves rather than foxes as his quarry.’
    • ‘The overall aim of our work was to measure the size of the hunting economy and to see what would happen if hunting live quarry with dogs were to be banned.’
    • ‘Sheltered from the highway, on this trail, the footprint of a doe could still be seen, as when the locals pursued their quarry a thousand years ago.’
    • ‘Thorn's tracker knew when his quarry became the hunter.’
    prey, victim
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A thing or person that is chased or sought.
      ‘the security police crossed the border in pursuit of their quarry’
      • ‘The man caught sight of his quarry atop the stairs, and made his way over to him.’
      • ‘Almost absently, his attention focused on his quarry, placing the glass on the table he stood, and made his way toward her.’
      • ‘We're off to chase down our quarry so we can personally deliver his paid-for ticket to the Eastwood Rugby Club function centre this Saturday night.’
      • ‘A young man runs through a bizarre hotel in pursuit of an unseen quarry.’
      • ‘This addition to weaponry technology could seek out its quarry by detecting the heat traces produced by a person's body.’
      • ‘In previous months, the same team of soldiers had launched 11 similar raids, sometimes reportedly missing their quarry by just a few hours.’
      • ‘Johnny will take a little ride to rehabilitate, not brutally punish, his quarry, who is, as usual, a fellow Italian-American.’
      • ‘But the author has kept his opening promise: His words have brought his elusive quarry to heel.’
      • ‘Getting back to the task at hand, he scooped visible wreckage away, wary of the glass shards and smiled in triumph as he spotted his quarry.’
      • ‘Rangers also tried to swat McGeady, but found him an elusive quarry.’
      • ‘Accompanied by spindly psychic Matthew Lillard, he comes to a grisly end in pursuit of his latest quarry.’
      • ‘Any good detective knows his quarry and his limits.’
      • ‘Grumbling over his quarry's escape, the storeowner stood, grabbed a broom, and immediately returned to a horizontal position.’
      • ‘There's plenty of fun though, and hints of Buchan and Childers, as the trio pursue their quarry to Inverness, shadowed by some dodgy German-speaking monks.’
      • ‘I'd hear a bird, follow the sound until I could see it, then flip feverishly through the field guide hoping to find a picture that would put a name to my quarry.’
      • ‘It now appears that the description of someone jumping over the barriers could in fact have been of a police officer in pursuit of his quarry.’
      • ‘One sign United have been piling less pressure on their quarry is that the penalty Van Nistelrooy scored against Tottenham recently was United's first in 11 months.’
      • ‘Thai troops are on alert along the border to prevent invasions due by troops in hot pursuit of their quarry.’
      • ‘In fact, Levin can spend years pursuing his quarry, often Corporate America.’
      • ‘There should be special provision in the international criminal court to protect their quarry from inhumane and unnatural persecution.’
      prey, victim
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French cuiree, alteration, influenced by cuir ‘leather’ and curer ‘clean, disembowel’, of couree, based on Latin cor ‘heart’. Originally the term denoted the parts of a deer that were placed on the hide and given as a reward to the hounds.

Pronunciation

Main definitions of quarry in English

: quarry1quarry2quarry3

quarry3

noun

  • 1A diamond-shaped pane of glass as used in lattice windows.

    • ‘The window quarries have been replaced by plate glass.’
    • ‘Amongst fragments set into the background of a fifteenth-century panel depicting St Mary Magdalen in the east chancel window are quarries with fragments of the Lovell rebus.’
    • ‘The surviving 17th-century windows are all of wood with quarries of hand-blown glass in lead cames attached to iron saddle-bars.’
  • 2

    short for quarry tile
    • ‘The ante-room has red quarries on the floor and heavily plastered brick walls.’
    • ‘Only 'first quality' quarries can be used externally without risk of delamination.’
    • ‘A staircase of red quarries led up to the second story.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in quarry (sense 2)): alteration of quarrel, which in late Middle English denoted a lattice windowpane.

Pronunciation