Main definitions of quarrel in US English:

: quarrel1quarrel2

quarrel1

noun

  • 1A heated argument or disagreement, typically about a trivial issue and between people who are usually on good term.

    ‘she made the mistake of picking a quarrel with John’
    • ‘The Baildons were known for legal quarrels, fighting, intimidation and even murder.’
    • ‘I have in mind the escalation of violent quarrels and feuds, particularly in a tribal culture.’
    • ‘Serious diplomatic quarrels and armed conflicts have begun over less significant misunderstandings.’
    • ‘The injury he had done was not the result of sudden heat of blood or quarrel, but of a deliberate determination to commit violence, for the purpose of preventing others working for the wages they chose to work for.’
    • ‘Their first meeting around Johnson's dinner table ended in a quarrel since Wollstonecraft disagreed with Godwin's sweeping atheism.’
    • ‘Confrontation on Spruce St. is one example, in which a young couple is seen arguing - maybe over a parking spot, maybe having a lovers' quarrel, maybe even sharing a joke.’
    • ‘It was not a particularly serious quarrel and the relationship between the two of you up to that point had been fairly good.’
    • ‘It is quite normal that conflicts of interests may sometimes lead to quarrels or even fights.’
    • ‘You are entering a challenging time of quarrels and conflict that nevertheless will offer you the chance to put an end to a tricky situation once and for all.’
    • ‘Customers often asked the kindly gentleman to help crack their problems, which could be anything from domestic quarrels to housing disputes.’
    • ‘Meanwhile courtiers had told Cosimo that his mathematician was engaging in disputes that might bring discredit on him, so he advised Galileo to write out his arguments and avoid public quarrels.’
    • ‘All the misunderstandings and quarrels of the past had been sorted out.’
    • ‘Tensions were also high between soldiers from Italian 1st Regiment and those from France, with arguments and quarrels among the soldiers leading to duels.’
    • ‘Best friends since secondary school, Jeff and Nick had their fair share of arguments and quarrels in their six years of friendship, but always managed to patch things up in a matter of time.’
    • ‘I still remember a lover's quarrel last February when I'd walked desolately along Madison Avenue, only to come across a small crowd gathered around the store.’
    • ‘Gossip causes quarrel and tears apart relationships, families, even entire communities.’
    • ‘However, it was no playground quarrel between fellow pupils.’
    • ‘Pam's recipe for a long and happy marriage is a lot of give and take, and always making up any arguments or quarrels before going to bed.’
    • ‘The office is not a place either for a lover's quarrel, which could be annoying and inappropriate to colleagues.’
    • ‘Actually, the same principle used to solve domestic quarrels can be applied to achieve world peace.’
    argument, row, fight, disagreement, difference of opinion, dissension, falling-out
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1usually with negative A reason for disagreement with a person, group, or principle.
      ‘we have no quarrel with the people of the country, only with the dictator’
      • ‘I find the movie-person's view of the arts much more congenial, whatever quarrels I may have with it.’
      • ‘Several, in fact, read my blog and with such people I have no quarrel and never have had one.’
      • ‘I have no quarrel with your terminology except that it has connotations of teenage American witches in my mind.’
      • ‘Most of this Indian section, which like the rest of the book rides on a great deal of research, is smoothly convincing; we sanction it without quarrel as the prelude to the real event, the shipwreck.’
      • ‘She shares her own student quarrels with New Criticism, describes how she supplements her use of it with psychology and history, and laments its waning relevance.’
      • ‘That's one of my chief quarrels with that form of Christianity.’
      • ‘On the contrary, many people who have no quarrel with having liquor served with meals often treat the matter as a non-issue.’
      • ‘They will get no quarrel from me about the utterly tacky impropriety of these guys acting as the messengers for such a call.’
      • ‘If ‘just’ means ‘generating more revenues for government’, then no quarrel there.’
      • ‘MacSwan's basic quarrel is with the widely discredited notion of semilingualism that, he argues, is perpetuated in Cummins' theories.’
      • ‘One would have no quarrel in taking into account the factor of saving the prosecutrix the ordeal of giving evidence.’
      • ‘That war was not the quarrel of the indigenous people, yet we conscripted them to fight it.’
      • ‘And I have absolutely no quarrel whatsoever with how well, Steve, you performed your duties.’
      • ‘My only real quarrel is with the chapter on ‘Neurodevelopment and Pharmacological Treatment’ by the aforementioned editors of Pathological Gambling.’
      • ‘It is not the French people with whom I have any quarrel, but their corporate interpretation and abuse of EU rules does stick in the gullet.’
      • ‘I have no quarrels with the broad thrust of the ambitions laid out in the smart, successful Scotland strategy.’
      • ‘I have no quarrel was those who call themselves ‘Traditionalist’ Catholic per se.’
      • ‘My second quarrel is with Prager's description of the Left as ‘easily offended’.’
      • ‘As for D' Souza's defense of capitalism, he'll get no quarrel from me, although it's astonishing how little these arguments change over the years.’
      • ‘Consider this: the samples were tested at Metrowater's laboratory and there should thus be no quarrel about figures!’

verb

[no object]
  • 1Have a heated argument or disagreement.

    ‘stop quarreling with your sister’
    • ‘The two have quarreled through the media since then, each with differing opinions of the fight.’
    • ‘However, while the women bickered and quarreled, their herds escaped.’
    • ‘Now, husband and wife are quarrelling about more mundane matters.’
    • ‘Police said the couple had quarrelled earlier in the evening.’
    • ‘He doubts the ship's capacity to reach Europe, quarrels with his captain and asks to be left on the next island where there is water.’
    • ‘Mr Babbage and Mr Clement had a big disagreement and quarrelled over money.’
    • ‘When her husband took drugs, he became a completely different person who would quarrel over trivia, and even simple things like not having orange juice in the refrigerator can lead to big fights.’
    • ‘There was, consequently, little communication to be had between the two of us, but I learned my fair share of slang and swear words, and I also learned to quarrel in a foreign language.’
    • ‘At a Vanity Fair photo session, the rivalry between the women spilled into outright hostility when they quarrelled about who should stand where in a group shot.’
    • ‘She and Winston quarreled frequently about money during the lean years after Lord Randolph's death.’
    • ‘They accuse and defend, bicker and quarrel, and cannot seem to talk about their real feelings or listen to each other.’
    • ‘While neither side disputed the facts with respect to integration, they quarrelled over differing interpretations of the consequences.’
    • ‘We've got differences of opinions but we've never quarrelled.’
    • ‘They bicker and quarrel, yet clearly love each other.’
    • ‘It was Salih who had read Founding Brothers and who reminded the American journalist that even the Founding Fathers had quarreled among themselves, argued, and nurtured grudges.’
    • ‘Initially, the cultural differences between the two causes them to quarrel, but as they set farther into the desert, the film becomes one of mutual self-discovery.’
    • ‘We should not quarrel over external differences.’
    • ‘After the enemies were vanquished, however, the victors quarreled and their fundamental disagreements emerged.’
    • ‘Of course, lovers never had it easy: Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet paid with their lives only because their families quarrelled.’
    • ‘On various occasions during the trip Tim and Chris quarrelled, but Tim assured Trevor in the long run it made their friendship stronger.’
    argue, have a fight, have a row, row, fight, disagree, fail to agree, differ, be at odds, have a misunderstanding, be at variance, fall out
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1quarrel with Take exception to or disagree with (something)
      ‘some people quarrel with this approach’
      • ‘He may have been a tyrant but the world still quarrels with the manner and mode in which he was ousted from power by the powerful nations who on paper believe in democracy and the rule of law.’
      • ‘He was an effective president anyway and I don't quarrel with his legacy.’
      • ‘But rather than quarreling with what he says, I will present my own view and leave it to readers to decide whether the differences are subtle or substantial.’
      • ‘It's a word - I'm quarrelling not with you, obviously, I'm quarrelling with the culture, which is one of the things I like to do.’
      • ‘‘I don't think it would be fair and honourable to start quarreling with the results,’ she said.’
      • ‘But at the same time, he quarrels with the logic that produced that strategy and puts a set of onerous conditions in the way of its execution.’
      • ‘That this concept is true is just so blazingly obvious that I can't imagine anybody quarrelling with it.’
      • ‘We believe in the system of justice, and I've been prosecutor for 37 years, and 37 years, I have never quarreled with a jury's verdict and I'm not going to start today.’
      • ‘Till date, no one has quarrelled with the fee structure - not even the government.’
      • ‘Staff have suggested 17 different alternatives, on which the public will be asked to give opinions, providing no one quarrels with the magic number of four, which is what council has decided we will have.’
      • ‘It's interesting to hear you say all of that, because no one quarrels with the fact that Bono does his homework and that his heart is in the right place.’
      • ‘But I am not quarreling with the fact that the reviewer doesn't like the book - he's perfectly free not to - or even with the idea that if there were some sort of objective, platonic ideal of a best books list, Tolkien would not be on it.’
      • ‘The Ciceronian Review also quarrels with the rotunda analogy, and asserts ‘the evidence suggests that the Democrats did not know the files were open.’’
      • ‘Muldoon's ambition was always palpable, but Johansson quarrels with the common view that he simply used power in the service of his own ambitions.’
      • ‘I guess Taheri wouldn't quarrel with that, as far as it goes.’
      find fault with, fault, criticize, argue against, argue with, object to, be hostile to, censure, condemn, be against, be anti, oppose, be in opposition to, take exception to, attack, take issue with, find lacking, pick holes in, impugn, contradict, dispute, rebut, complain about, cavil at, carp at
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘reason for disagreement with a person’): from Old French querele, from Latin querel(l)a ‘complaint’, from queri ‘complain’.

Pronunciation

Main definitions of quarrel in US English:

: quarrel1quarrel2

quarrel2

noun

  • 1historical A short, heavy, square-headed arrow or bolt used in a crossbow or arbalest.

    • ‘A few Elven archers fell, pierced by the poisoned crossbow quarrels (arrows).’
    • ‘A box of quarrels for the crossbow that hung from his saddle adorned his belt, and the usual broadsword rode in its scabbard on his left side.’
    • ‘I ducked as a crossbow quarrel clattered against stone near my head.’
    • ‘Many simply fell over others who'd gone down in front of them, but at such short range a single quarrel could drive clean through two or even three men, and they wreaked terrible havoc.’
  • 2A small, diamond-shaped pane of glass as used in lattice windows.

  • 3Northern English A square floor tile.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, based on late Latin quadrus ‘square’.

Pronunciation