Definition of put (or set) someone right in US English:

put (or set) someone right

phrase

  • 1Restore someone to health.

    • ‘Having excited the driver's sympathy with this doleful mention of his wife we were driven round the corner to a cheerful looking café where the driver suggested we should have a cup of tea, because this was ‘sure to set us right.’’
    • ‘I always keep a packet of Kellogg's All Bran and whenever I am in danger, it puts me right again.’
  • 2Make someone understand the true facts of a situation.

    • ‘If you thought the British were a nation who never complained, Debbie Hurworth would soon be able to put you right.’
    • ‘Well of course, this email is irrelevant and what you have of course is the CEO of Customs, Mr Woodward, writing to the various newspapers, putting them right in this regard.’
    • ‘Fellow Mammoth Ellie may think she is a giant-sized possum (one of the more irritating story elements), but once she is set right, there seems a fair chance that mammoths might not face extinction after all.’
    • ‘Get talking to the owner and he'll delight in putting you right about the ones you didn't know.’
    • ‘The ‘After Hours’ quote has the central character getting something a little wrong, and the character who does the correcting flatly and contemptuously sets him right.’
    • ‘Based on earlier reports we incorrectly overestimated the capacity improvement of the new disk format, thanks for putting us right on that.’
    • ‘And who better to set them right than a former TV talk show host, Labour MP and newspaper commentator?’
    • ‘Feel free to disagree, tell us why we are wrong, and put us right.’
    • ‘If anyone is prone to believe this superstition, Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable soon puts them right.’
    • ‘There were plenty of critics (including Goethe) who had noted the self-revelatory nature of Shakespeare's plays, and whose articles and commentaries could easily have set him right.’