Definition of purveyance in US English:

purveyance

noun

formal
  • 1The action of purveying something.

    • ‘As a result of this selection being chosen, testing for a liberal media bias, whether one views it as an assertion or an assumption was not within the purveyance of this study.’
    • ‘William Cecil thought it would be a good idea to replace purveyance entirely with composition and gradually this began to be the case.’
    • ‘It essentially deals with information collection and purveyance.’
    • ‘Now, we in the humanities are concerned primarily with the monitoring of the dominant cultural tradition, its preservation and its purveyance, right?’
    • ‘Coupons and special ‘cheap times’ are just the beginning of customer promotions in the modern world of sex purveyance.’
    • ‘Fuller became a thorn in the government's side on many other issues, particularly the great questions of royal finance, purveyance and impositions.’
    • ‘The reorganization made it possible to put the fuel supply in order within a short period, to streamline its delivery, and to establish day-to-day supervision of fuel production and fuel purveyance to large strategic formations.’
    1. 1.1British historical The right of the sovereign to buy provisions and use horses and vehicles for a fixed price lower than the market value.

Origin

Middle English (in the senses ‘foresight’ and ‘prearrangement’): from Old French porveance, from Latin providentia ‘foresight’ (see providence).

Pronunciation

purveyance

/pərˈvāəns//pərˈveɪəns/