Main definitions of pupil in English

: pupil1pupil2

pupil1

noun

  • A student in school.

    • ‘The individual schools, pupils and teachers involved are not identified in the programme.’
    • ‘Both teachers and pupils are looking forward to the new school term and all its challenges.’
    • ‘Over a quarter of all secondary school pupils in Rochdale played truant last year.’
    • ‘Reports of abuse by gangs of students on both fellow pupils and teachers occur daily.’
    • ‘Former pupils and teachers joined together to mark the closure of a school.’
    • ‘It also has four primary schools and one high school, meaning good pupil to teacher ratios.’
    • ‘In the second school, pupils were taught in bare rooms at the top of a narrow, stone staircase.’
    • ‘I have been in academic life now, pupil, student and teacher, for over half a century.’
    • ‘Lancaster University is offering dozens of school pupils a taste of student life this summer.’
    • ‘Many students and school pupils returned home due to their teachers being on strike.’
    • ‘Teachers are seen by pupils not to teach but as a way they can justify themselves at the next inspection.’
    • ‘Her killing has shocked teachers and pupils at her old school Southlands High, in the town.’
    • ‘The teachers also taught the pupils to sing one or two songs in a different language.’
    • ‘A good third of Hartman's helpers were high school pupils and university students.’
    • ‘The relation of master and apprentice was very close, not at all like the relation of pupil and teacher today.’
    • ‘One in every five secondary school pupils plays truant, according to Whitehall.’
    • ‘A former sixth form pupil at Ulverston Victoria High School is returning as head teacher in September.’
    • ‘A school is teaching pupils the importance of hand washing following an outbreak of ringworm.’
    • ‘He told delegates the primary school pupil had attacked four teachers.’
    • ‘When I teach school pupils I make sure they have fun as well as know basic co-ordinated moves.’
    student, schoolchild, schoolboy, schoolgirl, scholar
    disciple, follower, learner, student, protégé, apprentice, trainee, mentee, probationer, novice, recruit, beginner, tyro, neophyte
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘orphan, ward’): from Old French pupille, from Latin pupillus (diminutive of pupus ‘boy’) and pupilla (diminutive of pupa ‘girl’).

Pronunciation

pupil

/ˈpjupəl//ˈpyo͞opəl/

Main definitions of pupil in English

: pupil1pupil2

pupil2

noun

  • The dark circular opening in the center of the iris of the eye, varying in size to regulate the amount of light reaching the retina.

    • ‘Staff in eye clinics often warn people whose pupils have been dilated not to drive home.’
    • ‘It varies the size of the pupil and the thickness of the lens of the eyes to adjust for brightness and for distance.’
    • ‘If the glint appears right in the centre of the pupil then it means the person is making eye contact.’
    • ‘The cornea is hazy because of oedema, and the pupil is semidilated and fixed to light.’
    • ‘Muscles controlling the iris change the size of the pupil according to light conditions.’
    • ‘Calmly I went in and looked in the mirror only to find that my left pupil was grossly dilated, the right one being normal and reacting.’
    • ‘It was not necessary for us to agonise over the state of the retina or retinal vessels through a small undilated pupil.’
    • ‘The pupil shrinks with age, allowing smaller amounts of light to filter into the eye to assist with vision.’
    • ‘If the pupil is not dilated, the inflamed iris will stick to the lens, which can lead to scarring.’
    • ‘The pupils do not change size when a bright light is projected into them.’
    • ‘The cornea is the clear part of the outer layer of the eye that covers the iris and the pupil.’
    • ‘The pupils should be dilated and the fundus examined in a darkened room.’
    • ‘Perhaps I did not observe closely enough the reaction of his pupils to light and accommodation.’
    • ‘He says he has been prescribed pills which reduce the blurring by reducing the size of his pupil but he says he cannot drive at night now.’
    • ‘It is held to the eyes and uses a green flashing light to scan the pupils.’
    • ‘His pupils were dilated, and there was mild local swelling at the bite site.’
    • ‘Look at the eyes again, concentrating on the light reflex in the iris and pupil.’
    • ‘Her pupils responded by dilating to a bright light.’
    • ‘The procedure involved displacing the lens from the pupil into the vitreous cavity.’
    • ‘The tests will dilate the pupils and make it impossible to drive or do close work for several hours afterwards.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French pupille or Latin pupilla, diminutive of pupa ‘doll’ (so named from the tiny reflected images visible in the eye).

Pronunciation

pupil

/ˈpjupəl//ˈpyo͞opəl/