Main definitions of punch in US English:

: punch1punch2punch3punch4

punch1

verb

[with object]
  • 1Strike with the fist.

    ‘she punched him in the face and ran off’
    • ‘The man ended up in a ball on the ground while he was kicked and punched by several youths, said Mrs Walsh.’
    • ‘They were kicking and punching me - I'm not sure how many times.’
    • ‘She didn't expect him to suddenly strike out and punch her in the gut with his hand wrapped around Norianna's hilt.’
    • ‘Unflinching Verna caught the drow's arm in a hand and twisted it violently, striking out to punch her opponent beneath the chin.’
    • ‘I kicked and punched it until I collapsed on the floor in drooling, sniffling, bawling heap of tears.’
    • ‘The officers were also accused of pulling her hair, punching her arms and kicking her in front of her daughter after separating them.’
    • ‘On the lower tier of the stand we had Italian fans waving sticks at the local police, punching them, kicking them and lobbing flares before being battered into submission.’
    • ‘To score, you kick or punch the ball over the bar for one point or in the net for three points. search news’
    • ‘The men assaulted the guards, knocking the male to the floor and kicking and punching him while pointing a gun at him.’
    • ‘She climbed in the kitchen window and saw him with a knife, the court heard, and believing she was at risk kicked and punched him to the floor.’
    • ‘The incident took place on the night of January 4 when the glass window was smashed, allegedly by Cole punching it with his fist.’
    • ‘I see more and more pictures of police kicking and punching protesters who are clearly not throwing anything and seemingly doing nothing.’
    • ‘Adam curled up into a ball and wept as they punched him, kicked him, stamped on him.’
    • ‘A Yorkshireman who fought off a great white shark by kicking and punching it and pulling his leg out of its mouth is likely to make a full recovery, doctors said yesterday.’
    • ‘‘They were kicking and punching men and women indiscriminately,’ a photographer said.’
    • ‘Another man, in a Mercedes coupe, was punched and kicked as he grappled with carjackers who struck at Dudley Hill in the city.’
    • ‘For the moment, however, the police can only say that a man has been charged with repeatedly kicking and punching a child and that six members of the public volunteered statements.’
    • ‘In another attack, he said a 14-year-old girl needed hospital treatment after being punched and kicked to the floor by a gang of seven boys.’
    • ‘He was attacked by youths from the group who pulled him to the ground before punching him, kicking him and hitting him with a ‘For Sale’ sign.’
    • ‘The Commanding Officer reacted by punching the prisoner and kicking him and finally sending him back to the cells without medical treatment.’
    hit, strike, knock, thump, thwack, jab, cuff, clip, smash, slam, welt
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Drive with a blow from the fist.
      ‘he punched the ball into his own goal’
  • 2Press (a button or key on a machine).

    • ‘As she punched the elevator button and waited for the lift to the third floor, her other hand touched the pocket of her white tweed coat.’
    • ‘She punched the button beneath it and a small pump began venting the room's air through a duct leading to the exterior of the ship.’
    • ‘About ten minutes in, the first programmer, Richard Head, started furiously punching his buttons.’
    • ‘Dean Potter punches a button on a plastic wristwatch looped around his climbing harness.’
    • ‘They reached the elevators and Jim laughed as he punched the button.’
    • ‘I punched the button again, pressing my finger against the stupid button until the area around my nail was white with pressure.’
    • ‘Justy punched a button beside the lift and they heard a light hum as the carriage descended to their level.’
    • ‘He punched a few buttons on his keyboard and proceeded to interrogate me.’
    • ‘His hand hovered over the phone before he lifted it and punched the buttons.’
    • ‘He conceded he was possibly better off not knowing and punched the button outside the lift a fraction of a second before the doors closed.’
    • ‘He punched the button to call the elevator to his floor.’
    • ‘She punched a button on her desk and turned back to Sam.’
    • ‘The district police can punch one button to get to the appropriate emergency responder.’
    • ‘Wolfen shouted at him and practically punched the button on the elevator.’
    • ‘He reached over and punched a unmarked button on the side of the machine that could only be described as a doorframe.’
    • ‘She sighed quietly and stepped into the lift, punching the button.’
    • ‘She punched the button for the elevator, fuming the entire time.’
    • ‘He swung the machine aside and punched a few buttons on a control panel, hoisting the machine up to the left side of the ceiling.’
    • ‘The NASA guys look all worried and they're punching a million buttons and making phone calls.’
    • ‘Striding through the lobby with not so much as a glance at the other occupants, the man closed his umbrella and punched a button on the elevator.’
    1. 2.1punch something in/into Enter information by pressing a button or key.
      • ‘He phoned elderly Americans and persuaded them to reveal their numbers and then he punched them into a handy machine in his home, which printed the new card.’
      • ‘With that, he climbs into his Forester and starts punching numbers into the dash-mounted cell phone.’
      • ‘They'll simultaneously punch random buttons in separate elevators at the Waldorf, and if they emerge on the same floor, it'll be kismet.’
      • ‘They did this by punching birthdates into their computer and seeing which single women's names came up.’
      • ‘The handlers who are stationed near the dispensing unit receive the cash and punch the amount into the battery-powered machine which prints out the bill.’
      • ‘She seemed satisfied as he pulled his PDA out and expertly punched her information in.’
      • ‘‘Someone has tripped the motion sensor alarm at Bonham Estate,’ they informed him as he punched a few commands into the computer.’
      • ‘If the card is not working don't keep punching your number in, report it to the bank or ring the police.’
      • ‘As well, many transactions such as banking that used to require fronting up to a real person can now be done by punching numbers into a machine.’
      • ‘After completing the pilot phase, I entered the airborne-tactical officer phase, where I spent most of my days in a simulator, punching buttons in tactical scenarios.’
      • ‘I mumbled something equally articulate in response and then we sort of walked to the desk together to punch our numbers in.’
      • ‘With practiced ease, she punched the right button in the maze of buttons, levers, switches, and dials.’
      • ‘Alma was sitting on the bed punching buttons into the remote.’
      • ‘‘That should do it,’ said Suzanne, punching the last button in a final sort of way.’
      • ‘At the beginning of the conflict, target coordinates for bombs were punched in manually.’
      • ‘So I dutifully began the process of double check for permit/ticket before punching details into my rinky dinky little hand held computer prior to handing out parking ticket.’
      • ‘But then the woman suddenly dropped him and turned back to the elevator, taking her anger out on the buttons as she punched the code in fiercely.’
      • ‘As one Music TV director put it, editors were ‘just punching images into the [editing] machines, to see how fast we could get them to go.’’
      • ‘You only have to punch the information into a drum machine once.’
      • ‘Quickly, he punched the numbers into the machine and then waited for an answer.’
  • 3North American Drive (cattle) by prodding them with a stick.

noun

  • 1A blow with the fist.

    • ‘For months the Northwich teenager practised high kicks, punches and devastating blows to destroy blocks of wood.’
    • ‘We rolled across the pavement of the bridge, exchanging blows and punches while the others fought the mafia.’
    • ‘‘Impact upon his body’ can mean an auto accident, a fall, a punch, a blow, or a gunshot.’
    • ‘Brant drew back his fist and landed a punch squarely on the right-side of his face.’
    • ‘I landed a well-aimed punch at her probably already broken nose.’
    • ‘Noah was back on his feet and agilely evaded the next punch while slamming his own fist into the man's stomach.’
    • ‘Before Christian's father and uncle could react, he charged, knocking the pair aside with well-aimed punches.’
    • ‘They ram into the wall, exchanging body blows and punches as they scuffle.’
    • ‘The pair moved innocently about the ring for much of the opening two minutes with their punches sending loud smacks all over the empty arena.’
    • ‘He never even saw the punch coming, the blow sending him sprawling to the ground.’
    • ‘But domestic violence doesn't always manifest itself in punches and blows.’
    • ‘A woman staying on the same corridor heard loud punches and likened the blows to those sometimes heard in TV programmes.’
    • ‘But then Mallory tried to punch him, but speed, still turned back to her, caught her punch with his fist.’
    • ‘Without warning, Jason stepped forward, and threw out a punch; his fist connecting with Josh's cheek.’
    • ‘As the camp counselor, you can help children recognize how words can hurt as much as a tumble or a well-aimed punch.’
    • ‘Such blows still felt like punches from a circus strong man no matter how much shielding they invented for us.’
    • ‘She deflected his blow and aimed a punch at his abdomen.’
    • ‘They exchanged punches, blows, blocks, and kicks, one after another, so fast that I could hardly follow.’
    • ‘He said the blows, kicks and punches continued even when he cowered on the floor with his hands protecting his head.’
    • ‘A well-aimed punch sucks all the air out of my lungs and I fall gasping.’
    blow, hit, knock, thump, thwack, box, jab, fist, cuff, clip, smash, slam, welt, straight, uppercut, hook, body blow
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1informal The strength needed to deliver a blow with the fist.
      ‘he has the punch to knock out anyone in his division’
      • ‘Just when both sides appeared to be settling for a point Nish delivered the killer punch when he popped up at the back post to convert Hamilton's miss-hit shot.’
    2. 1.2informal in singular The power to impress or startle.
      ‘photos give their arguments an extra visual punch’
      • ‘The full force of his indomitable logic hits you like a power punch!’
      • ‘Their breakthrough song undoubtedly rocks the venue, with the power punch of a stand-out track.’
      • ‘The current crop of adverts simply don't grab the attention and lack punch, said Brahm's creative director, Mike Black.’
      • ‘Both music tracks are outstanding, with only the boost of the amplifier giving it an extra punch.’
      • ‘A caffeinated punch adds to its powers of rejuvenation.’
      • ‘The film that is funny and serious at the same time, packs an extra punch with a special appearance by Kamal Hasan in his ‘Sandiyar’ avatar.’
      • ‘Hatton's body work is impressive but the right hook from Magee is the dominant punch.’
      • ‘It follows too closely in the footsteps of films like Full Metal Jacket and Three Kings, but lacks similar power and punch.’
      • ‘This week's reader offer from the bookstore carries an extra punch.’
      • ‘The plot may have been plundered on countless occasions by playwrights, film-makers and novelists, but nevertheless its emotional impact still packs a powerful punch.’
      • ‘Change of scale and a riot of color gave this collage an extraordinary punch and visual appeal.’
      • ‘Each slogan landed with the force of a punch and won cheers from a largely conservative crowd of South Dakotan students.’
      • ‘It gets at an emotional and political truth about the Holocaust, with a power and punch that a realist film could never have managed.’
      • ‘This makes the book a one-two punch of the visual combined with his autobiographical poetry.’
      • ‘That was more like it - punch, panache and power.’
      • ‘Critics raved about the power and sledgehammer punch of the book.’
      • ‘Unsurprisingly, they are promising a spectacle to cater for the fans who like their touchdowns to come with an extra punch.’
      • ‘It demonstrates that this tiny work can take such magnification and still pack a visual punch.’
      • ‘This led her to wonder whether fluorescent feathers had more visual punch and were more attractive to potential mates than dimmer feathers.’
      • ‘Plus short sentences have more punch and more impact.’
      vigour, vigorousness, liveliness, vivacity, vitality, force, forcefulness, drive, strength, zest, animation, verve, panache, enthusiasm, impact, bite, kick, effectiveness, influence
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • beat someone to the punch

    • informal Anticipate or forestall someone's actions.

      • ‘Should we really believe that David floated this story without further confirmation because he was concerned that John might beat him to the punch?’
      • ‘In case they hadn't noticed, Ordnance Survey beat them to the punch.’
      • ‘You get a story and you want to go with it before somebody else beats you to the punch, so sometimes it doesn't get checked as thoroughly.’
      • ‘They may also be haunted by the fear that someone else will be thinking along similar lines and may beat them to the punch.’
      • ‘Elliot's high school prom has him missing the chance to dance with the girl with the broken leg; he is beaten to the punch by a more courageous guy.’
      • ‘Olivia was a contender, but my brother and sister-in-law beat me to the punch.’
      • ‘He beat me to the punch by a full half-hour - and I work with the attorney for one of the parties!’
      • ‘But once more a Midway forward beat him to the punch.’
      • ‘I am about to share this theory with Byatt, but she beats me to the punch, with yet another theory of her own.’
      • ‘We beat Ron to the punch and tell the others before we tell him.’
  • punch the (time) clock

    • 1(of an employee) punch in or out.

      • ‘Be ready to work, in every respect, before you punch the time clock.’
      • ‘That way, when it's time to punch the clock, you'll be ready to indulge in these other ‘me time’ tips.’
      • ‘He denied the charges, pointing out that he had spoken to his supervisor and punched the time clock.’
      • ‘The police and fire unions promised Saidel their members would continue punching the clock.’
      • ‘They wax rhapsodic about the pleasure of no longer having to commute or punch the time clock.’
      • ‘When I first met her, she was punching the clock as a foreman welder at a North Vancouver metal shop.’
      • ‘I've punched the clock from 9-5 for twenty-five years for the corporation.’
      • ‘So not only will vacationing workers receive their normal day's pay, but those who are compelled to punch the clock on Friday will receive a little extra cash for their trouble.’
      • ‘Generally speaking, workers didn't start punching the clock because they were forced to but because they wanted to.’
      • ‘So it's not like, punch the clock and let me out of my cubicle/prison?’
      1. 1.1Be employed in a conventional job with regular hours.
        • ‘My work schedule is very elastic; I don't have to go to meetings, I don't have to punch the clock, I don't have to have my butt in a chair between certain hours.’
        • ‘At least McGillivary and Barnes punched the clock for a couple of years.’
        • ‘But finally, I got away from punching the clock.’
        • ‘Perhaps that's because 50 percent of workers today expect to continue punching the clock after ‘retirement,’ whereas just 22 percent of today's retirees still have some sort of gig.’
  • punch someone's lights out

    • Beat someone up; knock someone unconscious.

      • ‘If you called him a hero, he'd punch your lights out.’
      • ‘It might have been worth it if the climax had been a comedy terrorist dressed as a hijacker jumping onto the stage and punching his lights out.’
      • ‘Rick somehow made Michael's name sound like something filthy, and I could barely keep myself from punching his lights out.’
      • ‘The food's off, the beer's warm, the staff are abusive, he's short changed when he buys a pint and a big fat bloke with shaved head and wearing a shellsuit punches his lights out.’
      • ‘They always had to talk about beating someone up or punching their lights out.’
      • ‘Women like her character because when her husband says insensitive things she punches his lights out.’
      • ‘I can be all for free speech but still punch your lights out if you make a rude, demeaning comment to my child.’
      • ‘I felt like punching his lights out and beating him to a bloody pulp!’
      • ‘He would have punched Zoeller 's lights out, figuratively, if not literally.’
      • ‘Vinnie Jones used to get a feeling seconds before punching someone's lights out.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • punch in (or out)

    • Register one's arrival at (or departure from) work, especially by means of a time clock.

      ‘she couldn't punch in, because there were no time clocks’
      • ‘A week later, when they tried to punch in, security guards told them they'd been fired.’
      • ‘Now, each employee has an individual code number and has to punch in and out every day.’
      • ‘This is not to say that every government employee checks his brain and his principles at the door when he punches in for the first time.’
      • ‘The absolute worst work condition we ever heard about was a 1960's factory where the owner made all workers punch out on the time clock to use the bathroom.’
      • ‘I watched her absently walk over to the clock and punch out.’
      • ‘The greatest feeling I get as an entrepreneur is when I go into the back, into the facility here and to see the employees punching out on their time cards to go home and on payday to know that I've contributed to their livelihood.’
      • ‘Danmar regularly had employees punch out after 40 hours and then forced them to continue working.’
      • ‘In the middle of a transaction I excused myself for ‘just a moment’ went to the cloak room, grabbed my belongings, punched out and ran home.’
      • ‘Does the president of General Motors go down and check out as the shift punches out and changes?’
      • ‘Before Ian could jam his card into the clock to punch out, Dupont called him from the office.’
  • punch something up

    • 1Use a computer keyboard to call something to the screen.

      ‘people will be able to punch up Andy Warhol and get text, photographs, and video on the entire Pop Art period’
      • ‘Rather, he says, users will ‘just be able to punch them up’ on the site.’
      • ‘Every year, however, it never fails: Someone gives us their registration card (complete with Ethernet address) and we punch it up to verify the brand of card.’
    • 2Enliven.

      ‘he needed to punch up his meandering presentation’
      • ‘Unless he punches it up, he will be treated more harshly by CBS than he was by the Senate.’
      • ‘They even use cartoon clips now and then to punch things up a bit.’
      • ‘If she can hold it together and punch things up an notch, she has an outside shot at advancing beyond the semifinals.’
      • ‘Once again working with Visconti, Bowie seems determined to punch things up a little more with this effort.’
      • ‘Ok, this not a new idea, but try punching it up a bit.’
      • ‘He relies on the performers to punch things up, especially in the first half of the film.’
      • ‘‘Back To California’ punches things up with some cool bass and a catchy hook, while one of the album's more mellow moments, ‘God Says Nothing Back,’ has a hypnotic quality thanks to Jakob Dylan's low, smoky vocals.’
      • ‘Those moments could have been so great if they would have worked more on the cutscene, punching it up with the dialogue and music.’
      • ‘They even edit the presentations and punch them up with good intros and music to make them even more entertaining.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb in the sense ‘puncture, prod’): variant of pounce.

Pronunciation

punch

/pən(t)SH//pən(t)ʃ/

Main definitions of punch in US English:

: punch1punch2punch3punch4

punch2

noun

  • 1A device or machine for making holes in materials such as paper, leather, metal, and plaster.

    • ‘The working chisels are used for cutting the metal, punches and a block having proper-sized holes are used for punching out holes.’
    • ‘Now you need to keep the liquid under pressure so that liquid pushed the metal against the punch.’
    • ‘You may put a hole in the top with a paper punch and tie a ribbon through the hole.’
    • ‘Leather punches are ultra-sharp, will cut cleanly through heavy fabric and are available in a variety of shapes and sizes.’
    • ‘Yes, I think the reason I did not have it there, I think a hole punch has obscured the paragraph number.’
    • ‘She's not the sharpest tool in the box - I even had to show her how to use a hole punch properly.’
    • ‘Katie bought paper bags and used my paper punches to make luminaries.’
    • ‘Use those bits of leftover wrapping paper and a hole punch to make confetti (a great job for the kids)!’
    • ‘Make eyelet holes with a hole punch or scissors in the top left and right corners of both triangles.’
    • ‘Others made bubbles with hole punches, and once this process began, the possibilities became endless for new ideas with a hole punch.’
    • ‘Finally, the students would use a hole punch at the top of the leaf and attach string for hanging the project.’
    • ‘Use paper punches (one large, one small) to cut the eyes and pupils out of colored paper, and glue on.’
    • ‘Essentially, this is an operation where there is a pressurized water chamber into which a punch pushes the metal blank.’
    • ‘Here, stiff strips of paper have been tinted a dull green or brown by a chlorophyll wash and perforated with a hole punch.’
    • ‘I trace the bolt holes with a scribe and punch them out with a hole punch.’
    • ‘Some are marked with stamps, some with a hole punch, others a scribbled initial.’
    • ‘Give each child a handful of hole punches and let them have sprinkle these over the paper.’
    • ‘Hughes takes hole punch to sheets of paper and then glues the left over discs back in place leaving a pattern.’
    • ‘Take a hole punch to a randomly selected page from a glossy magazine and scatter a layer of confetti across your desktop.’
    • ‘I have my stapler fully locked and loaded and strapped to my ankle I have the hole punch for emergencies.’
  • 2A tool or machine for impressing a design or stamping a die on a material.

    • ‘Hollerith designed punches specially made for his system, the Hollerith Electric Tabulating System.’
    • ‘After it is cut down, sheet stock goes to the turret punch to get holes put in as needed, goes to a brake press to be bent.’
    • ‘He began to concentrate on the design and manufacture of punch, stamp and draw tools for the production of metal car panels.’

verb

[with object]
  • 1Pierce a hole in (metal, paper, leather, etc.) with or as though with a punch.

    • ‘Megawati shouted to her supporters while demonstrating how to punch ballot papers for her party's number and logo of a bull with a white nose at a soccer field in the town of Gianyar.’
    • ‘This allowed experienced professional weavers, like the Hartmans, to modify designs before punching the cards.’
    • ‘Say what you want about Kidd's off the clock antics, he is spectacular when he punches his card.’
    • ‘I bet when the curtain closes behind him on Tuesday, he punches the card for that candidate.’
    • ‘At this point, apparently, many people just decided to punch the second hole to represent the second set of candidates.’
    • ‘Some voters apparently had to indicate their choice by punching a card by machine, using machines over 50 years old which sometimes failed to punch the card successfully!’
    • ‘That is because of ‘chads’ on the punched ballot, or small pieces of paper left when the voter does not fully punch the paper.’
    • ‘Overall though, the concept is simple: find your candidate, find their number on the ballot; punch the hole.’
    • ‘Corresponding holes in the front of the parfleche were punched with a tapestry needle.’
    • ‘Some ballots are being recounted after voters apparently punched the paper when it was folded in two.’
    • ‘When many of them go into the voting booth they will punch the card or pull the lever for a candidate who appears strong.’
    • ‘The papers are neatly punched, indexed and occasionally underlined with red pen.’
    • ‘Although, now that I think about it, the tool to punch the card was just a screwdriver.’
    make a hole in, punch holes in, put holes in, perforate, puncture, pierce, prick, hole, riddle, spike, skewer, spit, stick, pin, needle
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Pierce (a hole) with or as though with a punch.
      • ‘Some codes could only be understood by placing a sheet of paper punched with holes over the top so that just the relevant letters making up the message could be read.’
      • ‘Then I dug out an old belt and punched a new hole at the end.’
      • ‘In the instructions it said, go to the right and punch the hole to the right.’
      • ‘In a small garden, fill plastic rubbish sacks with them, tie the tops, punch a few holes at the bottom, and leave them to rot down in a quiet corner of the garden till next autumn.’
      • ‘First, he punched two holes on the side of an empty coffee can.’
      • ‘He punches spy holes in the wooden shutters so when he is indoors he can look out whether he is sitting or standing.’
      • ‘Rather than simply punching a straight hole down the center of the tube, the machines three distinct internal bore profiles.’
      • ‘This is easily done via the twin mounting holes punched through the bottom of the safe body.’
      • ‘Paint a metal-edged vellum gift tag (available at crafts stores) green, and punch a small hole on both ends of the tag.’
      • ‘Before attaching the hollow item, a hole was punched through the body pot so that the trapped air would vent into the space of the body.’
      • ‘Use an awl or pushpin and foam core to punch holes where you want to add stitching.’
      • ‘Carefully punch a small hole at each mark for your hanging string.’
      • ‘In most manufacturing, the flash hole is simply punched through the bottom of the primer pocket.’
      • ‘The red mulched subplots were obtained by taping a layer of red plastic over the existing layer of black plastic just before the holes were punched.’
      • ‘Use this simple tool to punch holes for connecting drip tapes to the supply line.’
      • ‘If you punch one hole in a boat, at best, the boat will never sail properly again and, at worst, the whole boat will sink.’
      • ‘A veritable patchwork of holes had already been punched into the leathery membranes, but it was still not enough.’
      • ‘Of course I used it all the time, to cut leather into strips, to punch holes, to cut small branches; but I knew this was not what he was asking.’
      • ‘Small round holes were punched on it in a gridlike pattern before the emulsion was peeled away from its paper backing.’
      • ‘Using a Japanese screw punch, mark and punch a hole through the screen that corresponds with the middle hole in the hinge.’

Origin

Early 16th century: perhaps an abbreviation of puncheon, or from the verb punch.

Pronunciation

punch

/pən(t)SH//pən(t)ʃ/

Main definitions of punch in US English:

: punch1punch2punch3punch4

punch3

noun

  • A drink made with fruit juices, soda, spices, and sometimes liquor, typically served in small cups from a large bowl.

    • ‘Fruit punch made from fruit juice is an excellent source of Vitamin C, providing about 35g of vitamin C per serving.’
    • ‘Socializing before or after event: heavy on the wine, a mulled rum punch, beer, light on the hard liquor’
    • ‘She had drunk six pints of lager, a ‘dirty pint’ containing spirits, and punch made with vodka, cider and lager.’
    • ‘She replied, ‘Gwen, the fruit punch will be fine, I will try the coconut water another day.’’
    • ‘However, when ordered as a warm drink in the winter this same sweetened rum punch was known as a ‘toddy.’’
    • ‘An Isleworth woman who never drinks had several glasses of fruit punch at a party and finished up driving at 64 miles an hour with well over twice the legal limit for alcohol.’
    • ‘Fruit punch served with a tiny quantity of alcohol, everything was going great.’
    • ‘She had given a party the previous night and drank several glasses of vodka punch, cognac, wine and beer.’
    • ‘I made a semi alcoholic punch with loads of fruit and ice. Yummy and a few beers for the boys.’
    • ‘Fruit punch and mince pies will be served in the interval of the Methodist Church performance.’
    • ‘She also complained that some of the staff were poorly trained and described the butler as a buffoon who was only good for mixing a fruit and rum punch.’
    • ‘Another universal and potent colonial drink was punch.’
    • ‘Approximately how many people would this recipe serve, if everyone had 500 ml of punch to drink?’
    • ‘In the unfortunate absence of a Spanish wine on the menu, the best alternative is the excellent Sangria, an alcoholic Spanish fruit punch.’
    • ‘Similar weight increases were found in those with intakes of fruit punch and fruit juice.’
    • ‘Pick your choice of tipple from white or red wine, fruit punch or lager as your peruse the menu and enjoy live reggae music from a local band.’
    • ‘Hot punch and mulled wine will be served with 15% off all stock.’
    • ‘Some nice wee Polish ladies make us tea, plates of borscht and alcohol free fruit punch.’
    • ‘Waiters in white coats serve you rum punch: trade winds trickle through the trees; and the scent of jasmine fills the air.’
    • ‘Iced tea, fruit punch, water, milk, coffee, and hot tea were complimentary.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: apparently from Sanskrit pañca ‘five, five kinds of’ (because the drink had five ingredients).

Pronunciation

punch

/pən(t)SH//pən(t)ʃ/

Main definitions of punch in US English:

: punch1punch2punch3punch4

punch4

noun

Punch
  • A grotesque, hook-nosed, humpbacked buffoon, the chief male character of the Punch and Judy show. Punch is the English variant of a stock character derived ultimately from Italian commedia dell'arte.

    Also called Punchinello

Phrases

  • pleased as Punch

    • Feeling great delight or pride.

      • ‘Because if you visit the region where he started out 10 or 15 years ago, you will quickly discover that his one-time colleagues are as proud as Punch to shake his hand.’
      • ‘As for the man himself, he's as pleased as Punch that the food and drink elements of Staveley Mill Yard have proved such crowd-pullers.’
      • ‘If we give our best and St. Mary's of Galway go home with the cup, we'll congratulate them and salute their success, and we'll still be as proud as Punch of our lads.’
      • ‘Mother and son are both doing well and Grandpa Patsy is as pleased as Punch.’
      • ‘My mum would be as pleased as punch if I actually went, but my dad seems a bit more particular about it.’
      • ‘Some people are as pleased as Punch, notably the Australian of Commerce and Industry, which welcomed what it called a high quality deal, providing ‘substantial new market access opportunities’.’
      • ‘Yet I am at the same time as pleased as Punch about my English, Scottish and Irish ancestry and am also proud of the country that my forebears have created here in Australia.’
      • ‘I am really sad that Fergie was not around on Thursday when I walked out with England at Lord's because he would have been as proud as Punch for me.’
      • ‘Van der Merwe was as pleased as Punch following last Saturday's win, making the wry remark his team had scored more tries in one game than the entire season.’
      • ‘And then there's Max, looking as pleased as Punch in a photograph of the 1943 prefects.’

Origin

Mid 17th century (as a dialect term denoting a short, fat person): abbreviation of Punchinello.

Pronunciation

punch

/pən(t)SH//pən(t)ʃ/