Definition of pulp in English:

pulp

noun

  • 1A soft, wet, shapeless mass of material.

    ‘boiling with soda will reduce your peas to pulp’
    • ‘The hands that Marion used to warm in her gentle mother's hair, are the same frozen hands her father beat into a bloody swollen pulp, when Marion once disobeyed him, at age five.’
    • ‘The shipyards were doubtless full of men who could dismantle the defences of a huge audience in 30 seconds and then reduce them to one massed pulp of laughter for two-and-a-half hours.’
    • ‘One rainy night the offices were flooded, soaking several till rolls into a mushy pulp.’
    • ‘There were fine scallops too, nicely sautéed, sitting on an earthy pea pulp, anointed with a minty butter sauce.’
    • ‘Other than soggy pulp with the odd shard of pain.’
    • ‘After reading Monday's story of the 17-year-old York lad addicted to crime, my Evening Press was reduced to little more than tear-stained pulp.’
    • ‘If the giant was clever, he would have worn a helmet, thus deflecting the potentially lethal blow, and then proceeded to beat David into a throbbing bloody pulp.’
    • ‘Open out the body into a flat piece and scrape away the soft interior pulp.’
    • ‘I'm going beat him so hard he'll end up a bloody pulp.’
    • ‘The worst of the worst what is left after basic consummation the longitudinal fibroma of sugarcane stalks the iridescent pulp.’
    • ‘When the water is cool enough, use your hands to mash the pulp as finely as possible.’
    • ‘I set to the task of bagging it up before it collapsed into a heap of pulp and, when I was done, stood up and stretched my back.’
    • ‘My father was seconds away from beating Tyler and me to a bloody pulp.’
    • ‘Made from a composite of grass and sugar-cane pulp, the utensils are entirely natural.’
    • ‘According to P. Manoharan, Project Director, PACHE Trust, a tonne of paperboard could be manufactured from three tonnes of sugarcane pulp.’
    • ‘Squeeze the liquid into a bowl and set aside, discarding the pulp.’
    • ‘Some warriors were shown on television literally swimming in the fresh tomato purée, only their heads peeking out of the sea of red pulp.’
    • ‘When the famine came around here it was terrible, the lovely drills of potatoes were just getting ready to blossom and overnight were turned to stinking, rotting pulp.’
    • ‘Make use of other men's we-should-protect-demure-damsels-in-distress ego thingy and make sure the molester becomes pulp.’
    • ‘Reading the hundreds of blog entries about Huffington's site from today is like watching a swarm of fire ants invade a robin's nest and turn the chicks to red pulp.’
    mash, mush, purée, cream, pressé, pap, slop, paste, slush, mulch, swill, slurry, semi-liquid, semi-fluid, mess
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    1. 1.1 The soft fleshy part of a fruit.
      • ‘Getting any sort of fleshy pulp was very difficult, so I squeezed the fruits to get decent amounts of liquid.’
      • ‘Marmalade is made from citrus fruits, jam from fruit pulp and jelly from fruit juice with no bits in.’
      • ‘To make the dressing, scoop the passion fruit pulp into a sieve over a bowl to extract the juice (it should be about 1 tbs).’
      • ‘Mango being the season, its pulp is being readied at one corner.’
      • ‘Bright flies were embedded in the stringy pulp, the glistening flesh of the fruit.’
      • ‘Wet waste connotes anything generated from the kitchen - vegetable and fruit peels, pulp, left-over food matter.’
      • ‘The fleshy pulp is orange or yellow, with a scent of pineapple, and full of seeds.’
      • ‘The pulp of Baobab fruits has a taste like the cream of tartar and is used to treat fever, dysentery and stomach ailments in some parts of Asia.’
      • ‘Fruit butters are made from fruit pulp cooked with sugar until thickened to a spreadable consistency.’
      • ‘Discard the tomato pulp, season the tomato water, and reserve.’
      • ‘Straight energy feeds like molasses, rolled barley, rolled wheat, beet pulps, citric pulp and combinations of these are all suitable.’
      • ‘Jane suspends the pips in muslin to help the marmalade set, but I just use the juice and fleshy pulp from the inside of a lemon… it does the same trick.’
      • ‘Avocado has another use though, the mashed pulp of the fruit makes for an excellent and natural face-pack.’
      • ‘In a blender, combine the passion fruit pulp, passion fruit juice, coconut milk, lemon juice, and lime juice.’
      • ‘It was a thick juice with a generous amount of the fruit's pulp in it.’
      • ‘Wash the seeds well, rubbing to remove any pulp.’
      • ‘We picked up the rosy red ones first, as many as our arms could hold, and plopped down at the foot of the tree biting into the fleshy pulp.’
      • ‘It also helps to understand what makes jam or jelly set: it's pectin, a natural substance that binds the fruit pulp with acid and sugar.’
      • ‘However, they are not pests because palm civets digest only the outer pulp of fruit, passing the coffee beans unharmed through their digestive systems.’
      • ‘Avocado oil is produced by mashing the pulp of the avocado fruit.’
      flesh, soft part, fleshy part, marrow, meat
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    2. 1.2 A soft wet mass of fibers derived from rags or wood, used in papermaking.
      • ‘The notion of the forest uncompromisingly supplying fibre for pulp, paper and sawmills has been a basic premise or point of departure in all Baskerville's calculations.’
      • ‘His favorite tree could one day be processed into pulp.’
      • ‘It is also the world's second-largest producer of chemicals used to bleach pulp for papermaking.’
      • ‘As vice president, Megawati in 2000 actually allowed its operation resumption but the company was only allowed to produce pulp and no longer rayon.’
      • ‘The most important reasons for this are strong commodity prices, particularly for copper, pulp, paper and wood products.’
      • ‘They are used for the first chemical processing step of converting wood chips into pulp for paper manufacturing, primarily in the sulphate or kraft paper process.’
      • ‘It was printed in 20 colors and was made from a combination of pressed paper pulp and adhered lithographic elements.’
      • ‘What if, say, I think the book I receive in the mail is a waste of pulp, a detriment to society and is frightening in the way that indoctrination literature always is?’
      • ‘The object of the plots is to measure which plants produce the best fibre for pulp and paper use and also which produce the highest volume of fibre.’
      • ‘Second, heat drives lignocellulose resin (ie, lignin) out of the wood's pulp during the sterilization process.’
      • ‘The two tycoons have been involved in a long-running legal dispute centring on the ownership of two of Russia's largest pulp and paper mills.’
      • ‘Wood pulp is an input in the production of paper.’
      • ‘These products may also contain rayon and wood fluff, which is chemically derived from tree pulp and then bleached.’
      • ‘Next comes the scooping stage, which requires the most skill, because the amount of pulp scooped and the evenness of its spread on the frame decides the quality of the paper.’
      • ‘Dividends halved; volumes of pulp doubled; native forests cleared doubled - those are the facts from their accounts.’
      • ‘Owners of legal sawmills, plus a multitude of illegal ones, compete for raw materials with the large pulp companies.’
      • ‘Like cutting cedar for fencing material, oil and pulp production, a good pecan crop can augment yearly income.’
      • ‘Other global businesses include palm oil refining, acrylic fibre, paper pulp and copper concentrate.’
      • ‘Made asked the companies, such as pulp and paper mills, to start considering the import of logs from other countries including Australia.’
      • ‘Poplar wood has many end uses, including pulp and paper, timber, plywood, pallets, soft board, and hard board.’
    3. 1.3 Vascular tissue filling the interior cavity and root canals of a tooth.
      • ‘Human teeth are made up of four different types of tissue: pulp, dentin, enamel, and cementum.’
      • ‘In the middle of every tooth, there is space containing dental pulp.’
      • ‘A loose or broken filling may also cause infection in the tooth pulp.’
      • ‘As the decay nears the dental pulp you may suffer from toothache.’
      • ‘The bulk of the tooth consists of the bony substance dentine, surrounding the soft inner pulp that contains blood vessels and nerves.’
    4. 1.4Mining Pulverized ore mixed with water.
      • ‘A device for borehole hydraulic mining includes a pipeline for delivering fluid into the hole accommodated inside a pipeline for bringing pulp to the surface.’
  • 2[usually as modifier] Popular or sensational writing that is generally regarded as being of poor quality.

    ‘the story is a mix of pulp fiction and Greek tragedy’
    • ‘Stark, terrific book - is there such a thing as philosophical pulp?’
    • ‘It was a fitting end to a game that had more twists and turns than a pulp fiction thriller.’
    • ‘A descent into this kind of carnally driven pulp should be conducted boldly and without apology, which is a courage that Cristofer cannot seem to muster.’
    • ‘It's a fast-paced pulp science fiction yarn with compelling characters.’
    • ‘Popular pulp fiction and radio sow the seeds of resistance to social injustice.’
    trashy, rubbishy, cheap, sensational, lurid, tasteless, kitschy
    tacky
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Crush into a soft, shapeless mass.

    • ‘New technologies for pulping fast-growth trees figured prominently.’
    • ‘As well, another 30,000 hectares would provide quantity of produce necessary for processing - probably by pulping and freezing.’
    • ‘Picking bakeapples and pulping them into the most delicious jam on the face of the planet.’
    • ‘First the apples are pulped in a machine called a scratter box, then they're poured and folded into large cloths called hairs (from the horsehair they were once made of) and stacked up into a ‘cheese’.’
    • ‘The coffee is then pulped to remove the berry kernels and then the beans are dried.’
    • ‘In short, their personalities have been pulped by a system of entrenched gender stereotypes.’
    • ‘Faking Cleopatra's suicide would have been as easy as pulping a fig.’
    • ‘The mash was nice and creamy, but not pulped to mush, and then there were some crunchy sweet potato crisps to top it all off.’
    • ‘About mid-career, in order to create a mask of professionalism, many journalists tend to pulp the optimism and joy they first felt at writing.’
    • ‘It might amaze people to know that you actually get less money if you chop down and pulp a 500 year old tree, than if you pulp a 13 year old tree.’
    mash, purée, cream, crush, press, smash, liquidize, liquefy, sieve, shred, squash, pound, beat, macerate, mill, grind, mince, soften, mangle
    comminute, triturate
    levigate, bray, powderize
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    1. 1.1 Withdraw (a publication) from the market and recycle the paper.
      • ‘And this doesn't included the sixty billion paperbacks printed every year, half of which are pulped and set to Japan to make toilet paper.’
      • ‘Your book is found to be libellous and the publisher doesn't want to get sued, so they cancel publication, or if it's been printed, withdraw the book and pulp it.’
      • ‘Then it's shipped off to a paper maker, where it will be pulped, de-inked and turned back into newsprint.’
      • ‘At the end of January the government's statistical service pulped the entire print run of its annual compendium of social statistics just days before publication, following a decision to censor the lead-in article.’
      • ‘When I was at Pantheon, we received a memo saying every book that sold less than 2,000 copies a year should be pulped, as if it had a contagion that would have infected the other books in the warehouse.’
      • ‘Here's a positive point, then: there's still nearly three months for someone to discover a copyright problem and pulp the whole lot.’
      • ‘The Federal Opposition says a leaked copy of a now pulped colour brochure has revealed the Government's real industrial agenda.’
      • ‘The key to writing a bi-weekly column throughout the summer is to write a column a week in advance of its appearing on the news stand that will still be relevant three weeks later when the issue is finally pulped.’
      • ‘The printer's decision to pulp an early printing of the issue, fearing legal action, is reported around the world.’
      • ‘Soon after publication, the Central Propaganda Bureau issued an order to recall all copies and have them pulped.’
      • ‘But supporters need not panic, nor the View's editors rush to pulp this week's issue.’
      • ‘The product was hastily withdrawn from the market and all 2,000 copies had to be pulped.’
      • ‘MPs also agreed that parties will not have to pulp election leaflets due to be distributed to individual households and to allow extra finance to cover unforeseen costs caused by the delay.’
      • ‘The brochure - printed at the end of last year - is being pulped and another is being produced because the old one was said to be deterring potential guests.’
      • ‘German authorities and the journal's publisher distanced themselves from the article's content and announced, without giving any specific reasons for their decision, that the residual print run was to be pulped.’
      • ‘Only at the last minute did a lackey spot the error and the whole issue had to be pulped and then reprinted, a mop-up operation that cost £4,000.’
      • ‘Sadly, it is difficult to get hold of as the copies not yet sold were pulped by the publishers when the ‘fraud’ was discovered.’
      • ‘Instead of sending their old stock back to wherever they came from or pulping them, Indian distributors must find a way to let old bookstores have them for a bargain.’
      • ‘The cards and envelopes are pulped and recycled to make new products.’
      • ‘I assist him to circulate his ideas mainly out of free-speech considerations - as there have been great efforts made (sacking him from his university job, pulping his book) by Leftists to suppress him.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting the soft fleshy part of fruit): from Latin pulpa. The verb dates from the mid 17th century.

Pronunciation

pulp

/pəlp/