Definition of pub crawl in English:

pub crawl

noun

British
informal
  • A tour taking in several pubs or bars, with one or more drinks at each.

    • ‘Six of us (Gordon, Caroline, Michael, David, Warren and I) went for a mini pub crawl round the streets of Belgravia.’
    • ‘Elsewhere, Medieval Molly will show people around the ghastly ale houses of York on her Hallowe'en pub crawl.’
    • ‘A massive pub crawl ensued, aimed at partaking of the delicious American beers being featured at bars and brewpubs throughout the city.’
    • ‘This might be the world's most glamorous pub crawl, but it's still a pub crawl, and it could end only one way.’
    • ‘After that we went on a pub crawl until about 4am.’
    • ‘A pub crawl is a highly predictable event where you know beforehand exactly which pubs you're assaulting.’
    • ‘During her Halloween pub crawl, Molly will visit three venues: the Golden Fleece, Pavement, the Black Swan, Peasholme Green, and the Snickleway Inn, Goodramgate.’
    • ‘Ulysses on Wall Street is linked to Swift's Hibernian Lounge and Puck Fair - so a pub crawl between the three can be very civilised.’
    • ‘Well, the fun of that was something I couldn't pass up, so I joined the pub crawl as the ‘photographer’.’
    • ‘We stayed in the dressing room for a couple of hours chatting, drinking and singing, and on the way back to the hotel we had a bit of a pub crawl.’
    • ‘And, of course, there's the compulsory pub crawl.’
    • ‘I'd like to see someone do a pub crawl in New Mills, in the Peak District (37 pubs, one small town).’
    • ‘We chose a pub crawl instead of the usual coffee morning or raffle because it's a bit of fun and basically, this is us.’
    • ‘It's basically a pub crawl that also visits the haunted house.’
    • ‘The black stuff is available in every bar, and any visitor needs to sample not only a pint, but a pub crawl's worth of alcohol to get a true taste of Belfast life.’
    • ‘So, a few of my mates and I pulled out a map and did a pub crawl, drinking beers all day.’
    • ‘And he successfully curbed the once-notorious pub crawl which inevitably descended into brawls on Friday and Saturday nights.’
    • ‘This is the pub crawl along a seaside stretch of watering holes in Wales, near Swansea, that apparently used to be a regular night out for Dylan Thomas.’
    • ‘It's 38 degrees out here and I was out on a pub crawl last night.’
    • ‘And the next stop on our pub crawl in search of sport is the Frenches Club, a working man's club, in Redhill, in Surrey in England.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]British
informal
  • Go on a pub crawl.

    • ‘Police are calling time on pub-crawling youngsters out celebrating the results of their GCSEs or drowning their sorrows.’
    • ‘In one interview, he recalled with fondness his pub-crawling days in London before he gave up the drink.’
    • ‘He got from that period of pub-crawling with McCay all the material of his later poetry.’
    • ‘Simon sent customers fleeing in panic from the Whistlestop sandwich shop as he and 24 revellers passed through York Railway Station after several hours pub-crawling in the city centre, York magistrates heard.’
    • ‘This is the time to meet friends, try out new restaurants - and do a bit of shopping and some pub-crawling.’

Pronunciation:

pub crawl

/ˈpəb ˌkrôl/