Definition of psychodynamics in US English:

psychodynamics

plural noun

  • 1treated as singular The interrelation of the unconscious and conscious mental and emotional forces that determine personality and motivation.

    • ‘They represent that implicit knowledge of cultural psychodynamics that exists for communities in the vernacular imagination of communal discourse - in the telling of stories out of the common repertoire of local narrative tradition.’
    • ‘Ghassan Hage's book does not engage directly with the established Australian debates about multiculturalism and immigration, but subjects them to a systematic Lacanian analysis which foregrounds their unconscious psychodynamics.’
    • ‘Cochran's art is a strange if accurate way to keep a diary, a visual recording that gives form to the psychodynamics of mind and memory, evoking a spectrum of emotional responses.’
    • ‘Future studies should put emphasis in the psychodynamics of psi and in the emotional conflictivity, which, in greater or lesser degree, this seems to generate.’
    • ‘Alternatively, possession has been seen in terms of the psychodynamics of intrapsychic tensions and multiple personality disorders, as well as the physiology and epidemiology of trance states.’
    1. 1.1 The branch of psychology that deals with psychodynamics.
      • ‘I began my training in a fiercely eclectic psychiatric residency program about 30 years ago, wherein both psychodynamics and research-based biological psychiatry were taken very seriously.’
      • ‘Cognitive and evolutionary psychologists may find in psychodynamics careful descriptions of traits that may closely match the functional subunits of the mind that they are seeking.’
      • ‘The intent of this article is to highlight the crucial role of psychotherapy supervision in the learning of psychodynamics and to emphasize that such knowledge is fundamental for psychiatrists.’

Pronunciation

psychodynamics

/ˌsīkōdīˈnamiks//ˌsaɪkoʊdaɪˈnæmɪks/