Definition of Protestant in English:

Protestant

noun

  • A member or follower of any of the Western Christian churches that are separate from the Roman Catholic Church and follow the principles of the Reformation, including the Baptist, Presbyterian, and Lutheran churches.

    • ‘The derisive response of many Protestants the following day was to pin twists of sponge to their lapel.’
    • ‘The Huguenots were French Protestants who had been persecuted for their faith.’
    • ‘Many evangelical Protestants also want to erode the separation of church and state.’
    • ‘She didn't argue that Protestants were there because they had nowhere else to go.’
    • ‘Some Protestants are joining the other faithful who use prayer beads as a tool of devotion.’
    • ‘There are now more Latino Protestants in the US than there are either Jews or Muslims.’
    • ‘The building was first founded as a Huguenot Church for Protestants fleeing Catholic oppression in France.’
    • ‘Evangelical Protestants sought the reformation of society as well as individuals.’
    • ‘At the end of his life, Erasmus was at odds with both Protestants and Roman Catholics.’
    • ‘In common with many Irish Protestants, he was horrified at the execution of Charles I.’
    • ‘It's a minority Church also in the north of Ireland where most Protestants are Presbyterians.’
    • ‘As a patron of church reform and champion of the Dutch Protestants, he was a sitting duck for Catholic polemicists.’
    • ‘Charles V had wanted abuses looked at first in an attempt to please the Protestants and hopefully tempt them back to the church.’
    • ‘Many Protestants were leaving the province to go to university in Britain, and often they did not return.’
    • ‘In those rock 'n' roll years, young Catholics and Protestants had even begun to mix as never before.’
    • ‘They are on a quest to find all the Protestants who used to live in the South but, according to Uncle Andy, have now gone missing.’
    nonconformist, protestant, freethinker, recusant
    View synonyms

adjective

  • Relating to or belonging to any of the Protestant churches.

    • ‘That is of course about what we have come to expect of the declining older Protestant churches.’
    • ‘It is not coincidence that the first modern industrial societies were predominantly Protestant in religion.’
    • ‘He soon determined to have Protestant religion in the land and devotion to the Bible.’
    • ‘He leaves those who want to run away from the discipline's Protestant past no place to hide.’
    • ‘We belong to an Anglo Saxon Protestant tradition in which color was always suspect.’
    • ‘Five years ago there were only four of us doing this work in the Protestant churches.’
    • ‘What is disturbing is that eighty per cent of these converts come from Protestant church backgrounds.’
    • ‘Catholic and Protestant army chaplains blessed the guns of the troops in England and Germany.’
    • ‘Many decrees issued by the council deliberately opposed Protestant viewpoints.’
    • ‘Today many urban Protestant churches in the USA boast a large choir and a staff of musicians.’
    • ‘It is true to a lesser degree of evangelical and independent Protestant groups as well.’
    • ‘Anglican Britain and Catholic Belgium industrialised before more notable Protestant countries.’
    • ‘The bells of Catholic and Protestant churches rang out across Germany at noon.’
    • ‘This is a new-built church for Protestant worship, enclosed within a little palisaded fence.’
    • ‘In the Protestant section of the church, no person has ever achieved an authority equal to that of the pope.’
    • ‘However, nearly a year of Edward's short Protestant reign had been lost in debate.’
    • ‘Even the most rational and least decorated of Protestant churches had an unmissable pulpit for the spreading of the Word.’
    • ‘The sheer diversity of Protestant churches, all of which recognize the same canon, is ample proof of this.’
    • ‘The appeal of Protestant hymns and psalms cut across all boundaries.’
    • ‘The major Protestant churches refrained from explicit endorsement of the Liberals.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: via German or French from Latin protestant- protesting from protestari (see protest).

Pronunciation:

Protestant

/ˈprädəstənt/