Definition of protest in English:

protest

noun

  • 1A statement or action expressing disapproval of or objection to something.

    ‘the Hungarian team lodged an official protest’
    ‘two senior scientists resigned in protest’
    • ‘Anyone in their right mind would have stormed out in protest, holding their stomachs.’
    • ‘In protest, town officials took down their provincial flags.’
    • ‘In protest, the remaining seven members of the board resigned.’
    • ‘The ravaged stretch - neglected for a decade - had drawn strong protests from the public.’
    • ‘In protest, she has been withholding rent for the past six months which has resulted in her being sued by her landlord, she says.’
    • ‘Jacqueline opened her mouth in protest, but at his obvious disapproval, decided against it.’
    • ‘In protest, the opposition did not participate in the vote, speaking of fraud and a ‘law of shame.’’
    • ‘My stomach grumbled in protest to all the junk I had gorged myself on.’
    • ‘In protest over the delay, Mr Smith began withholding rent in December, 1995.’
    • ‘In protest against the police behaviour, they went on the road to block traffic.’
    • ‘The news that budgetary considerations meant it would not be returning to the screens in the New Year drew strong protests from the public and the media.’
    • ‘And neither are condemnatory statements and protests, although they do serve the purpose of highlighting this scourge in our society.’
    • ‘I grumbled in protest, but reached for my keys anyway.’
    • ‘In protest, the new minister in town organized a bus boycott.’
    • ‘I have seen her shriek in protest, and then stop it when she seriously objects.’
    • ‘The government proposed phone charge increases of an average 35 percent in January, but delayed the hike due to strong protests from the public.’
    • ‘Instead, this is the moment to storm out in protest.’
    • ‘Hannah wails as she throws herself on the floor and clings to her mother's legs in protest.’
    • ‘In protest, some believers adopted a way of life known as monasticism.’
    • ‘And the new structure prompted angry protests from residents.’
    objection, exception, complaint, disapproval, disagreement, opposition, challenge, dissent, demurral, remonstration, expostulation, fuss, outcry
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    1. 1.1 An organized public demonstration expressing strong objection to a policy or course of action adopted by those in authority.
      as modifier ‘a protest march’
      • ‘The clashes were followed by protests on Tuesday, which were broken up by riot police.’
      • ‘The weekend's protests began in Melbourne, Australia, where 150,000 converged on the centre of the city.’
      • ‘The protesters congregated outside parliament before holding a sit-down protest in front of Downing Street.’
      • ‘The fact that the public have to resort to demonstrations or angry protests against administration policy show that there is something currently wrong with the relationship.’
      • ‘Last week's protest far exceeded the expectations of the organisers, who had predicted 100,000 would attend.’
      • ‘She said that following an interview on North West Radio to gauge public reaction to a protest rally, she was inundated with phone calls of support.’
      • ‘He said people should join a planned protest on July 1 to express their calls for democracy.’
      • ‘As the peaceful sit-down protest was winding down the police announced they would forcefully remove people.’
      • ‘Last week's protests came weeks after a general strike against the cuts paralysed the country.’
      • ‘A protest march is planned to take place on Thursday February 13.’
      • ‘Yet their only " crime " was to seek to organize peaceful anti-government protests.’
      • ‘The struggle against war cannot consist merely of organizing one protest demonstration after another.’
      • ‘Many different forms of student protest have already been organised.’
      • ‘People are making their own efforts to organise demonstrations and protest marches.’
      • ‘About 3,000 striking workers launched a sit-in hunger protest on July 2, outside the Health Ministry.’
      • ‘In Australia and New Zealand there are enough victims of real estate crooks to form a protest march to rival any public demonstration.’
      • ‘In some towns the students staged sit-down protests in the streets.’
      • ‘The protest demonstrations prior to the outbreak of war were the largest in history.’
      • ‘The incidences of violent crime are ongoing, and the more horrific ones usually spark some kind of immediate public reaction like a protest or a march.’
      • ‘And demonstration, marches, protests are part of democracy.’
      demonstration, march, protest march, peace camp, rally, sit-in, human chain, occupation, sleep-in, dirty protest, write-in, non-cooperation
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  • 2Law
    A written declaration, typically by a notary public, that a bill has been presented and payment or acceptance refused.

verb

  • 1no object Express an objection to what someone has said or done.

    ‘she wouldn't let him pay, and he didn't protest’
    • ‘To our objections, he protested that he had repeated our order back to us, and this is what we had ordered.’
    • ‘But I cannot even protest, because my complaint exposes me as an ingrate.’
    • ‘We felt it was our duty to protest on behalf of our investors.’
    • ‘And one woman objected to her husband protesting about cyclists.’
    • ‘He booted him out of the bar in front of his friends, which according to bar staff he had absolutely no legal right to do, and threatened to kick everyone out if they kept protesting.’
    • ‘Is it any wonder that eventually they begin to complain and protest?’
    • ‘It's as if they know, no matter how much they complain or protest, nothing will change.’
    • ‘He told the committee that he understood why the objectors were protesting as they had enjoyed the open space and green field near their homes.’
    • ‘We strongly protest this decision and urge you immediately to reconsider this decision.’
    • ‘When I complained to the landlord, he protested that they were all okay before I had moved in.’
    • ‘In some instances, detainees have been severely punished for complaining or protesting about the conditions inside the camps.’
    • ‘The patient protested, again complained of pain, and again requested a C-section.’
    • ‘Silently cursing, he dragged himself to his feet and followed the elder knight, protesting with his usual complaints.’
    • ‘He also claims to have been punched, kicked and strangled by guards ten days later when he protested about being given less than an hour's exercise.’
    • ‘Labor continued to resist change and various communities that would lose rail service protested to their congressional representatives.’
    • ‘It doesn't matter how much you protest that they don't speak for you - they do, now.’
    • ‘I protested at first, kicking my legs and waving my arms madly.’
    • ‘Planners, who will consider whether to grant planning permission next month, have received at least 12 objections protesting about the loss of green belt land.’
    • ‘They say there are people protesting, there are people complaining, there are people saying they want the plan changed.’
    • ‘Another reason may be that talking to the media is a way of denouncing, protesting, and also of protecting yourself.’
    express opposition, raise objections, object, make a protest, dissent, take issue, make a stand, take a stand, put up a fight, kick, take exception, complain, express disapproval, disagree, express disagreement, demur, remonstrate, expostulate, make a fuss
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    1. 1.1 Publicly demonstrate strong objection to a policy or course of action adopted by those in authority.
      ‘doctors and patients protested against plans to cut services at the hospital’
      • ‘About 10,000 German steel workers protested against the planned trading scheme on Monday.’
      • ‘The taxi association members were protesting against the impounding of their vehicles by traffic authorities for not having operating permits.’
      • ‘However, his prayers did not avert the famous Morozov strike of 1885, when his 8,000 workers protested against the fines.’
      • ‘Human-rights activists have protested against measures that would allow Britain to deport suspects to countries where they could face torture.’
      • ‘Workers also protested against the low wages they receive, compared to permanent staff.’
      • ‘While the flags of all 25 countries flapped in the light breeze, about 3,000 demonstrators protested against the war.’
      • ‘For several months, French temporary art workers and technicians have protested against cuts in their unemployment assurance scheme.’
      • ‘Ever since the disputed elections of 2000, opponents have protested against the worsening economic situation and lack of political dialogue.’
      • ‘In the new factories, industrial workers protested against the harsh conditions of work.’
      • ‘During last week's committee session, several opposition lawmakers strongly protested against the military's failure to send service leaders to the committee.’
      • ‘And, there were, of course, a few who protested against the revelry.’
      • ‘Small farmers and health service workers have also repeatedly protested against government policies.’
      • ‘On December 3 thousands protested against government economic policy outside the Ukrainian legislature.’
      • ‘In Egypt demonstrators protested against the war, but at the same time attacked the regime.’
      • ‘They are protesting against the imposition of a 1 percent pay rise for 2003 by the prison service.’
      • ‘The unions protested against wage cuts and layoffs for public sector workers.’
      • ‘The workers also protested against the company decision to send its Boeing 767 fleet to Singapore next year for servicing.’
      • ‘Thousands of Greek workers protested against the government's economic policies in the city of Thessaloniki on September 10.’
      • ‘The workers also protested against poor working conditions and job losses.’
      • ‘March 8, 1857 - Garment workers in New York city protested against poor working conditions and low wages.’
      demonstrate, march, hold a rally, sit in, form a human chain, occupy somewhere, sleep in, stage a dirty protest, refuse to cooperate
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2North American with object Publicly demonstrate an objection to (a policy or course of action)
      ‘the workers were protesting economic measures enacted a week earlier’
      • ‘If they protest a policy, they should expect to ‘be exited’ and then move on with their lives.’
      • ‘A committee of 56 workers has been organizing to protest what they call sweatshop conditions.’
      • ‘We are the party that protests outsourcing and off shore tax evasion and our ‘public being sold out abroad.’’
      • ‘Environmentalists loudly protested the administration's proposed reversal.’
      • ‘They were protesting his environmental and his economic policies.’
      • ‘Here, the governments control the economic policies, and the people cannot effectively boycott or protest everything by themselves.’
      • ‘Security is tight in Washington, D.C. as demonstrators protest the policies of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.’
      • ‘The demonstration follows a number of strikes and demonstrations held during the summer protesting the economic policies of the government.’
      • ‘In Berlin, left-wing protesters were out in force protesting government economic policies.’
      • ‘I mean, we cannot accept the mass killing of people who are just peacefully protesting.’
      • ‘In Bucharest, 2,000 workers protested in front of the government headquarters and at parliament offices.’
      • ‘All this means socialists will find themselves on the same demonstration, protesting the same social ill, from time to time.’
      • ‘During his last two years as a member of the Beatles, Lennon was spending much of his time with Yoko Ono, publicly protesting the Vietnam War and advocating peace.’
      • ‘Smokers and bar and restaurant owners in NYC are protesting proposed further restrictions on smoking in public places.’
      • ‘We've been permanently protesting outside the council offices over the last week.’
      • ‘They are protesting non-payment of salaries for eight months and are demanding a pay rise.’
      • ‘Of course, animal activists now also protest eating meat or drinking milk.’
      • ‘If there's a demonstration of hundreds of workers protesting something, it is determined not to be big news.’
      • ‘Well, what happened was, the law schools wanted to register some way of protesting the don't ask, don't tell policy.’
  • 2reporting verb Declare (something) firmly and emphatically in the face of stated or implied doubt or in response to an accusation.

    with direct speech ‘“I'm not being coy!” Lucy protested’
    with object ‘she has always protested her innocence’
    • ‘But she has always protested her innocence, saying the fire was an accident.’
    • ‘The pair, who have always protested their innocence, were jailed for life and told they would have to serve a minimum of 15 years before becoming eligible for parole.’
    • ‘All of those charges have protested their innocence, claiming that they were using accepted interrogation methods.’
    • ‘They each got three life sentences after a lengthy trial just over two years later but have always protested their innocence.’
    • ‘He said: ‘I have always protested my innocence and fought this case from day one.’’
    • ‘He has always protested his innocence and is seeking an inquiry into his detention.’
    • ‘A man who has spent 26 years in prison protesting his innocence of murder was suffering from a mental disorder at the time of his trial, the Court of Appeal heard yesterday.’
    • ‘They had consistently protested their innocence, claimed they were tortured in detention, and were eventually exonerated and released after sixteen years in prison.’
    • ‘‘There's no details worth sharing,’ I protested, mentally kicking myself for complaining about feeling off colour.’
    • ‘He can be as positive as he likes as he protests his innocence but he will need a minor miracle to get out of this scrape.’
    • ‘He has always protested his innocence, claiming that on the night of the shooting he was with a friend.’
    • ‘Contemporary dance is constantly called upon to protest its relevance against accusations of complacency and pretentiousness.’
    • ‘The more he protests his innocence, the more time he spends in prison.’
    • ‘He was arrested for gun-running a week after he arrived, but has always protested his innocence.’
    • ‘He has consistently protested his innocence and declared he has ‘a full answer’ to them.’
    • ‘The council then banned the driver from driving school buses but he protested his innocence and insisted the girls had lied.’
    • ‘Edward was a quiet, honest, simple American who had always protested his innocence.’
    • ‘He has always protested his innocence and his legal team say new DNA evidence could help clear him of the murder.’
    • ‘She has always continued to protest her innocence.’
    • ‘She had for the past three years protested her innocence, claiming that her son had drowned by accident.’
    insist on, claim, maintain, declare, announce, profess, proclaim, assert, affirm, argue, vow, avow, aver, pledge, swear, swear to, testify to
    View synonyms
  • 3Law
    with object Write or obtain a protest in regard to (a bill)

Phrases

  • under protest

    • After expressing one's objection or reluctance; unwillingly.

      ‘“I'm only here under protest,” Jenna said shortly’
      • ‘Soon they were confronting the two armed farmers and advising them to move off home which they eventually did under protest.’
      • ‘To avoid any controversy, he had deposited the amount under protest.’
      • ‘Now, under protest, they then resumed having daily briefings.’
      • ‘The only way she would allow Lilly to enter her friendly island was if she surrendered her passport during her stay, which Lilly did under protest.’
      • ‘Did they pay the marginal increase that they are objecting to under protest, as it were, or have they just refused to pay it, so they are not out of pocket for it?’
      • ‘He said legislators were making their amendment under protest but would proceed with their debate on May 19 because several wanted their objections to be noted in the official record.’
      • ‘However, once the work is paid for, the contract is concluded and a consumer cannot claim money back, unless they paid under protest, confirming that in writing at the time.’
      • ‘The ‘official’ gear was worn; the tape was simply an indication that it was being worn under protest and, on the scale of protests, it was pretty mild.’
      • ‘By the way, did the mayor sign the collective agreement under protest?’
      • ‘He speaks under protest, pleading that he has so far managed to avoid being photographed or profiled and would quite like to keep it that way.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb in the sense ‘make a solemn declaration’): from Old French protester, from Latin protestari, from pro- ‘forth, publicly’ + testari ‘assert’ (from testis ‘witness’).

Pronunciation

protest

/ˈproʊˌtɛst/