Definition of prostration in English:

prostration

noun

  • 1The action of lying stretched out on the ground.

    • ‘The Purification of Pride First of all, we should know why we do prostrations.’
    • ‘I am your Imam so do not precede me in bowing, prostration, standing or leaving.’
    • ‘The Significance of Devotion Our devotion will grow the more prostrations we do.’
    • ‘Prostrations help us realize that there is something more meaningful than ourselves.’
    • ‘The man scratched his head in wonder and the next day began to do prostrations.’
    • ‘We can consider these four foundations in the context of the stages of formless prostrations, which I will now describe.’
    • ‘Someone who dozes in the prayer does not owe a prostration.’
    • ‘Worshipers repeat their glorification of God and prostration three times.’
    • ‘We should not think that prostrations consist only of an activity of our body.’
    • ‘They asked him after the prayer was over about his long prostration.’
    • ‘We should not think that we are the only person doing prostrations.’
    • ‘Our prostrations immediately inspire all beings to begin doing the same practice.’
    • ‘The second kind of prostration is done out of the sincerity of your heart, not with a seeking mind.’
    • ‘The word in Arabic is masjid, you know, which means place of prostration, in fact.’
    • ‘The second salam occurs outside the prayer and so there is no reasonfor prostration.’
    • ‘Leading the prostrations became a joy, rather than an ordeal.’
    • ‘Prostration depicts a reverent figure stretching low across a broad canvas.’
    • ‘The mark of their Faith is on their faces from the traces of prostration during prayers.’
    • ‘The point is to do everything, beginning with the first prostration, for all forms of life.’
    • ‘It is not necessarily a bad thing to just do a prostration or a mantra mouthing the words.’
    collapse, weakness, debility, lassitude, exhaustion, fatigue, tiredness, enervation, emotional exhaustion
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The state of being extremely weak or subservient.
      ‘the refusal to call a strike reflects the union leadership's prostration before the company’
      • ‘Its support for the war and its prostration before Bush are not only a matter of cowardice.’
      • ‘This inflated conception of the strength of the Republicans is indicative of the despair of many ex-radicals and their prostration before political reaction.’
      • ‘The prostration of the Party has been amply demonstrated in the California recall election.’
      • ‘That it did is the outcome of the organization's and its affiliates ' political prostration before the Labour and trade union bureaucracy.’
      • ‘This outlook is not merely the ideology of Bush and his inner circle, as was made clear by the prostration of the Democratic Party.’
      • ‘Daschle, who epitomized political cowardice and conciliation, was a fitting symbol of the Democratic Party's prostration before the Bush administration and the ultra-right.’
      • ‘Blairs apparent stature can be accounted for by the prostration of his ostensible opponents.’
      • ‘This prostration is symptomatic of the present social dynamic in American bourgeois politics.’
      • ‘In these scenarios, scientists move in a flash of inspiration from prostration in the face of disease to triumph.’
      • ‘" Inflation, in its final stages, always ends in prostration, in what modern economists call a ' stabilization crisis. '’
      • ‘This is a formula for the utter prostration of the working class.’
      • ‘But Gephardt's campaign essentially collapsed, demonstrating the utter prostration of the trade union bureaucracy.’
      • ‘The prostration of the New York Times is the rule, not the exception.’
      • ‘Such is the shallowness of contemporary liberalism, and the gullibility and prostration of its representatives in the face of a government determined to go to war.’
      • ‘Summing up the unions ' prostration, Mighell complained: " This is a dispute the union most desperately didn't want to be in.’
      • ‘French parliamentary elections: political right benefits from prostration of the left’
      • ‘The prostration of the Democratic Party cleared the way for Reagan's election in 1980.’
      • ‘The Soviet working class paid for this by enormous physical and moral decline and was thrown back to the conditions of primitive want and political prostration.’
      • ‘In the facing of this offensive against the working class, the trade unions have demonstrated their complete prostration to the powers that be.’
      • ‘The prostration of the Democratic Party has encouraged the Bush administration to accelerate its attacks on working people.’
    2. 1.2 Extreme physical weakness or emotional exhaustion.
      • ‘Doctors found that the panda was affected by lung fever together with functional prostration on some organs.’
      • ‘It also can present as severe prostration without characteristic signs and symptoms.’
      • ‘Instead, they sought beautiful scenery to adorn their lives and therapy to soothe the cares and nervous prostration brought on by their intense work habits.’
      • ‘The eruption tends to become bullous and systemic symptoms, including fever and prostration, are present.’
      • ‘Unable to match the Indians' enviable capacity for keeping themselves cool, the animals died of heat prostration.’
      • ‘When I found him suffering from general debility and nervous prostration.’
      • ‘Asian ginseng may help with conditions like physical exhaustion, nervous prostration or emotional "burnout."’
      • ‘A sudden pale complexion with cold sweat is the sign of sudden prostration of yang qi due to febrile diseases caused by exogenous pathogenic wind-cold.’
      • ‘Between June 6 and July 18, forty-seven people were found dead of thirst and heat prostration on the Tohono O'Odham lands.’
      • ‘Any oil can cause heat retention and heat prostration.’

Pronunciation

prostration

/präˈstrāSH(ə)n//prɑˈstreɪʃ(ə)n/