Definition of prophesy in US English:

prophesy

verbprophesying, prophesied, prophesies

[with object]
  • Say that (a specified thing) will happen in the future.

    ‘Jacques was prophesying a bumper harvest’
    with clause ‘the papers prophesied that he would resign after the weekend’
    • ‘Elisha prophesies that she will have a son… and it occurs.’
    • ‘Aristotle wrote on prophesying through dreams.’
    • ‘And just as Elijah prophesied, the jar of flour did not go empty, and the jug of oil did not run dry.’
    • ‘That was the day when an important ancestor was prophesied to return, ‘coming like a butterfly.’’
    • ‘He preached, prophesied imminent apocalypse, attracted devoted followers, performed faith healings and exorcisms, and even had a vision of the devil after fasting 40 days in the desert.’
    • ‘At birth, Noah's father, Lamech, prophesies that his son will comfort humanity in its arduous labor.’
    • ‘Isaac's blessing prophesied that Esau would bow down before Jacob; but no, here is Jacob, bowing down before Esau.’
    • ‘Over the centuries, Nostradamus has been credited with prophesying murky futures down to the last detail.’
    • ‘Filled with the Holy Spirit, he proclaimed God's faithfulness and prophesied great blessings over his son.’
    • ‘It was prophesied of him: ‘I will open my mouth in parables, I will utter things hidden since the creation of the world’.’
    • ‘He visited it shortly before his death and prophesied it would be great but would face destruction either by fire, water, or civil war.’
    • ‘The next step in that integration, as science-fiction writers like William Gibson have prophesied, is the implanting of the microprocessor into the body, thus enhancing human capabilities and capacities.’
    • ‘It's clearly prophesied in the Holy Scriptures.’
    • ‘For those who don't have the possibility to learn astrology, there are simpler and easier methods to prophesy their future.’
    • ‘On the night before he died, Jesus prophesied that Peter would deny him three times-and he was right.’
    • ‘Also, in the same journal I write that D prophesied that I should beware of chewing gum, but later on M, who was sitting beside me, found some chewing gum under his seat, and D realised that the prophesy was actually for M, not for me.’
    • ‘The narrative of lament and hope prophesies that the judgment of history can be delayed but not denied.’
    • ‘Literal readings of the Bible predispose fundamentalists to adopt a theology that stresses premillennial dispensationalism, which means they believe in the Second Coming of Jesus as prophesied in the Bible.’
    • ‘Because such a four-tiered system is still in the future, I can only prophesy its appearance.’
    • ‘Gloucester visits Henry, who intuits his son is dead and prophesies Gloucester's future slaughter by recalling the evil omens of his birth.’
    predict, foretell, forecast, foresee, forewarn of, prognosticate, divine
    View synonyms

Usage

See prophecy

Origin

Middle English: from Old French profecier, from profecie (see prophecy).

Pronunciation

prophesy

/ˈpräfəˌsī//ˈprɑfəˌsaɪ/