Definition of prolific in English:

prolific

adjective

  • 1(of a plant, animal, or person) producing much fruit or foliage or many offspring.

    ‘in captivity tigers are prolific breeders’
    • ‘Meyers are a dime a dozen in many California backyards (we had a prolific tree next to our oranges).’
    • ‘Backs of vacant houses create a poor impression at the Docks, where weeds were quite prolific on the gravel areas.’
    • ‘The total catch remains high because they are replaced by short-lived, prolific species like mackerels.’
    • ‘It is only the female midge that bites (we refrain from any inappropriate comment whatsoever) and they are extremely prolific.’
    • ‘That North Mart must be a very prolific species.’
    • ‘It is one of Britain's most prolific weeds, with its creeping, fanned leaves having taken over large swathes of countryside.’
    • ‘You'll soon get to recognise the most prolific weeds in your garden and discover ways to keep them under control.’
    • ‘The average working life of a bee is eight weeks during the summer but the queen is very prolific and lays between 2,000-3,000 eggs a day so the hives are self generating.’
    • ‘Both are frequently images of creativity: rabbits are prolific and snakes shed their skins and grow new ones as an act of renewal.’
    productive, creative, inventive, fertile
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of an artist, author, or composer) producing many works.
      ‘he was a prolific composer of operas’
      • ‘Michael is one of the most prolific people in this business, with a number of books and a huge number of lectures behind him.’
      • ‘He doesn't do fiction, of course, but he is mighty prolific.’
      • ‘She is also a prolific composer of ballads in English and Irish.’
      • ‘Beamish is one of the best-known names in classical music, and Britain's most prolific composer of concertos.’
      • ‘He was incredibly prolific, writing hundreds of choral, keyboard and instrumental works.’
      • ‘He's one of the most prolific people out there in music right now.’
      • ‘He was a prolific composer, writing symphonies, concertos, sonatas, and dramatic works.’
      • ‘The prolific composer has led his own bands of all sizes, including big bands.’
      • ‘Although he was prolific, producing some 200 canvases in just one year at Arles, hardly anything sold.’
      • ‘There has hardly been a more prolific writer with a greater range of material to choose from.’
      • ‘Here is an amazingly prolific young songwriter who is teetering on the brink of worldwide recognition.’
      • ‘No black woman writer had been as prolific.’
      • ‘A prolific poet and author, he appears for the time being to have put down his pen.’
      • ‘Yet for someone who spends most of his life on the road he is a very prolific recording artist.’
      • ‘Helps was a legendary pianist and a prolific composer.’
      • ‘His passion for classical music, coupled with boundless energy, has made him one of the most prolific composers of the age.’
      • ‘Seeing this wealth of material brings home what an extraordinarily prolific group they were.’
      • ‘These prolific composers often wrote several operas in a single year, and reports of new performances spread quickly from city to city.’
      • ‘He developed into an extremely prolific playwright, novelist, and lecturer.’
      • ‘He was immensely prolific, producing more than 1,000 paintings and a great many drawings.’
    2. 1.2 (of a sports player) high-scoring.
      ‘a prolific home-run hitter’
      • ‘In fact, the line-backer has been a more prolific scorer this season than many offensive players throughout the league.’
      • ‘If you look at his record this season he is beginning to pick up all the traits of a prolific goal scorer.’
      • ‘Though by no means a prolific scorer, the leggy midfielder is always a threat going forward, where he uses his size and strength to full advantage.’
      • ‘The prolific scorer netted a hat-trick in this win over Brooklands.’
      • ‘Missing some of their regular players including their prolific scorer, Thomas Doyle, they still managed to gain a point from this fixture.’
      • ‘Displaying cat-like reflexes, Beene proved she was as adept at frustrating the world's most prolific goal scorers as her more famous rival.’
      • ‘In Pancev, they possessed the continent's most prolific scorer, with 34 goals for his club.’
      • ‘Carter can be one of the league's most prolific scorers, but he needs to drive to the basket more instead of settling for outside jumpers.’
      • ‘As the table below shows, left-handers have been far more prolific at this ground over the last four years.’
      • ‘Hasselbaink and Viduka are both prolific scorers and they are potentially a lethal combination up front.’
      • ‘The home side welcomed prolific scorer Ruth Jeays into the squad and started the match with a determination rarely seen at this level.’
      • ‘At the other end, prolific striker Steve Hislop came closest in the first half.’
      • ‘The 27-year-old former Lugano player is a prolific scorer, and illustrated as much with two goals against the Slovakian side.’
      • ‘Denis Savard and Joe Mullen were two of the NHL's most prolific scorers over their careers.’
      • ‘The lads are now calling Shaun Wright-Phillips a prolific scorer and at least it showed me that we are not one-dimensional.’
      • ‘They aren't the most prolific scorers in the league but their goals come from all over the team and with a solid back four they are third in the league on merit.’
      • ‘Indian cricket has seen some of the most prolific run scorers and bowlers.’
      • ‘With scoring at a premium in the playoffs, the teams with two prolific scorers are more difficult to match up against.’
      • ‘He was a prolific scorer at junior level and those in the know have long tipped him to make a career out of the game.’
      • ‘He was one of the most prolific natural goal scorers the game has ever seen.’
  • 2Present in large numbers or quantities; plentiful.

    ‘mahogany was once prolific in the tropical forests’
    • ‘What has changed is that this technology has become prolific.’
    • ‘The south is home to some of the most popular restcamps as the wildlife is prolific.’
    • ‘Forty-six species of wildlife have been identified here and the bird life is prolific.’
    • ‘Tourism is well controlled and, as a result, the wildlife is prolific but the birds and animals have become accustomed to visitors and many are quite tame.’
    • ‘In the east of Natal, a series of game reserves offer the chance to sample some of South Africa's varied and prolific wildlife.’
    • ‘Restricted movement causes increased pollution and traffic lights are becoming so prolific there must be a drain on power supplies.’
    • ‘Though the wildlife is not as prolific as in the upcountry game parks, the beautiful rainforest and the spectacular Sheldrick Falls make it worth a visit.’
    • ‘Because of Costa Rica's small size, its prolific animals and plants are easily accessible - and quite easy to see.’
    plentiful, abundant, bountiful, profuse, copious, luxuriant, rich, lush, proliferative
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 (of a river, area, or season of the year) characterized by plentiful wildlife or produce.
      ‘the prolific rivers and lakes of Franklin County’
      • ‘All of a sudden the fishing returns plummeted and overnight prolific sections of the river produced no fish.’
      • ‘The north of the island is by far the most prolific, especially Grankulla Bay, a large salty inland lake where the sheltered and shallow water offers refuge for the fish in spring and autumn.’
      • ‘From Cape Wrath to Campbeltown, once prolific river systems have been denuded of their most precious asset.’
      • ‘The Dee in Aberdeenshire, once a highly prolific spring river, continues to suffer from a dreadful lack of these big early salmon.’
      • ‘Beats higher up the river are often more prolific this late in the season with fish running hard to the middle and upper stretches.’
      abundant, plentiful, superabundant, considerable, copious, ample, lavish, luxuriant, profuse, boundless, munificent, bountiful, inexhaustible, generous
      View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century: from medieval Latin prolificus, from Latin proles ‘offspring’ (see proliferous).

Pronunciation

prolific

/prəˈlɪfɪk//prəˈlifik/