Definition of prohibition in English:

prohibition

noun

  • 1The action of forbidding something, especially by law.

    ‘they argue that prohibition of drugs will always fail’
    • ‘The blanket prohibition of drugs, I think, is wrong.’
    • ‘Thus, prohibition would be argued for on religious as well as on alleged scientific or medicinal grounds.’
    • ‘The strongest argument against prohibition is that it does not stop people from using drugs.’
    • ‘It's one more example of drug prohibition doing more harm than good.’
    • ‘The international prohibition of drugs is their lifeblood, and a guarantee of on-going civil war.’
    • ‘Beyond the substantial fiscal costs of enforcing the prohibition of cannabis, the social costs of such policies are considerable.’
    • ‘They do not even tell us whether the costs of drug use are lower than they would be without prohibition.’
    • ‘Any action carrying a risk of major disaster must be prohibited, regardless of the costs of prohibition.’
    • ‘Very few people in this country now believe that drug prohibition can work.’
    • ‘I'd like to promote elimination of drug prohibition.’
    • ‘The criminalization of responsible drug users is only one of the many pointless aspects of drug prohibition.’
    • ‘Turvey has long argued against drug prohibition, yet he increasingly applauds and encourages enforcement measures.’
    • ‘Harm reduction interventions have the potential to reduce the perils of both drug use and drug prohibition.’
    • ‘Marijuana may be relatively harmless, but marijuana prohibition is deadly.’
    • ‘Canadians have lost our sense of what is right and wrong over drug prohibition.’
    • ‘Even if surrogacy did breach some attractive moral principle, this would not automatically justify legislative prohibition.’
    • ‘The one on drug prohibition was also very important to me.’
    • ‘Ultimately, however, we do not believe that these arguments are sufficient reason to weaken society's prohibition of intentional killing.’
    • ‘The caller suggests that there is full prohibition of guns in France, but the rate of crime in France has increased significantly recently.’
    banning, forbidding, prohibiting, barring, debarment, vetoing, proscription, disallowing, disallowance, interdiction, outlawing, making illegal
    ban, bar, interdict, veto, embargo, injunction, proscription, boycott, moratorium
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A law or regulation forbidding something.
      ‘those who favor prohibitions on insider trading’
      • ‘When courts extend constitutional prohibitions beyond their previously recognized limit, they may restrict democratic choices made by public bodies.’
      • ‘Again, the Court noted that the injunctions did not constitute a blanket prohibition.’
      • ‘The legal prohibition on discrimination initially only applied to government actions.’
      • ‘Pipes says catching sleepers has been hampered by regulations, immigration law, and prohibitions on ethnic profiling.’
      • ‘The prohibition on ‘common law’ crimes is a good thing even though injustice can result.’
      • ‘In the absence of statutory criminal prohibitions, the transactions involved in the scheme and the scheme itself are lawful.’
      • ‘Similarly, many prohibitions of the criminal law are morally neutral.’
      • ‘The actual wording of the clause imposes a blanket prohibition on working for another firm of financial analysts.’
      • ‘I am not satisfied that they contravened the specific prohibition.’
      • ‘Disclosure would contravene a prohibition imposed by or under any enactment.’
      • ‘As Epstein notes, making no exception to a general prohibition on the use of force is not an option.’
      • ‘While some activities are prohibited, sanctuaries do not impose a total prohibition on human use.’
      • ‘In theory, the constitutional prohibition could be interpreted as applying only to the future.’
      • ‘Parliament has partly lifted the prohibition on imports and exports of cash via post deliveries.’
      • ‘That was said in the face of a statutory prohibition on commenting on the fact that the accused did not give sworn evidence.’
      • ‘The prohibition on retroactive penal legislation is linked to the right to a fair trial, as it is irrevocably an example of an unfair trial.’
      • ‘When it comes to local news, we will continue with our general prohibition on the use of anonymous sources.’
      • ‘There are eight classes of injunctions and prohibitions which apply to all deeds and actions of mankind.’
      • ‘International law establishes an absolute prohibition against torture.’
      • ‘No government would contend that these prohibitions apply only to parties to the treaties that outlaw them.’
  • 2The prevention by law of the manufacture and sale of alcohol, especially in the US between 1920 and 1933.

    • ‘Students were amazed at the way food was served, and at the ready availability of alcohol on board, especially during Prohibition.’
    • ‘As the fight for Prohibition showed, the social gospel leaders cared about whether people drank or didn't drink.’
    • ‘An English trade embargo on Irish whiskey and Prohibition here in the U.S. helped shutter most of Ireland's distilleries.’
    • ‘Like the first Prohibition in the 1920s, an underground industry in alcohol had sprung up, and organized crime grew more powerful.’
    • ‘He is currently researching business support for Prohibition.’
    • ‘Enforcing Prohibition was so onerous we had to repeal the very constitutional amendment the zealots encouraged us to pass.’
    • ‘The demand for illicit drugs is as strong as the nation's thirst for bootleg booze during Prohibition.’
    • ‘The best American piece is on how Scotch whisky still poured into the USA during Prohibition.’
    • ‘The cases date back to the 1920s, when Prohibition created an illicit trade in alcohol.’
    • ‘Later, the islands were used as a smuggling stopover for arms in the civil war and for bootleg alcohol during Prohibition.’
    • ‘The legacies of Prohibition were an increased level of alcohol consumption and flourishing organised crime.’
    • ‘Prohibition in the 1920s created a market for cheap versions of alcoholic products, such as bathtub gin.’
    • ‘It is akin to the banning of alcohol in the U.S.A. during the time of Prohibition, and is totally unenforceable.’
    • ‘Exchange controls resemble U.S. Prohibition during the 1920s.’
    • ‘After Prohibition was repealed, brandy remained a relatively ordinary product although its commercial importance grew over the decades.’
    • ‘Made up largely of family-owned vineyards at the onset of Prohibition, the industry got clobbered by the new legislation.’
    • ‘Laws harking back to Prohibition require vintners to sell their wines through state-licensed distributors.’
    • ‘His sleepy hollow, in the dirt-poor Appalachian foothills, soon became more popular than a speakeasy during Prohibition.’
    • ‘Politicians who argued to overturn Prohibition in the United States used this argument.’
    • ‘How much weight did he give to the corruption and violent crime induced by Prohibition?’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin prohibitio(n-), from prohibere ‘keep in check’ (see prohibit).

Pronunciation

prohibition

/ˌprō(h)əˈbiSH(ə)n//ˌproʊ(h)əˈbɪʃ(ə)n/