Main definitions of prog in English

: prog1prog2

prog1

noun

British
informal
  • 1A television or radio program.

    ‘I don't watch cookery progs’
    • ‘It's noteworthy that she was often pulled up for complaining about progs that she had never viewed.’
    • ‘I wish they would get rid of the idiots doing it now - I mean, how many presenters do you need in one prog?’
    • ‘But could they draw out a telly prog any further?’
    • ‘The Jimmy Young prog pre-dated the radio phone-in, so listeners' comments were still written on bits of paper and handed to the presenter.’
    • ‘It's brilliant, best thing on telly by a mile: fabulous 4th prog.’
    • ‘Here's hoping he has more women artists/bands and guests in future progs.’
    • ‘I could never appear on a discussion prog with her, I would end up with a brain haemorrhage.’
    • ‘I would love to help you put another prog together on OCD.’
    • ‘TV has tended to dumb down progs in the belief that it makes it better for the public.’
    • ‘I am Australian and it is a fact that we aren't all the drunks portrayed in so many TV progs and jokes.’
    broadcast, production, show, presentation, transmission, performance, telecast, simulcast, videocast, podcast
    View synonyms
  • 2A computer program.

    ‘there are progs for the PC that will convert images to sound’
    • ‘I have a prog that uses the cell phone's usb cable to let the laptop connect to the internet through the phone.’
    • ‘I did use the correct key, NOT one that was generated by the prog.’
    • ‘I tried to cancel the prog with ctrl-alt-del which only caused the screen to lock up.’
    • ‘I tried several times to run the prog with the same result each time.’
    • ‘I can't add a new prog, write to the partition, del the partition or change the file name.’
    • ‘She's running the install prog and not using the updater.’
    • ‘I know I need to burn off all mah stuff from that work machine tho and remove all the progs that aren't necessary.’
    • ‘Progs take about 30 secs to open.’
    • ‘My teacher told me to write a prog.’
    • ‘Each parameter has a tortuous history of manual and semi-automated interventions that I simply cannot just go back to early versions and run the update prog.’

Origin

1930s: abbreviation of program.

Pronunciation

prog

/prɑɡ//präɡ/

Main definitions of prog in English

: prog1prog2

prog2

noun

informal
  • 1A style of rock music popular especially in the 1970s and characterized by classical influences, the use of keyboard instruments, and lengthy compositions.

    ‘the band's blend of prog, psychedelia, and '60s pop’
    ‘I'm a child of the 60s and love prog rock’
    as modifier ‘a prog rock band’
    • ‘This is prog that nods to the past instrumentally but takes on the attitude of modern avant-garde acts like Boris in the process.’
    • ‘I was inspired by the '70s prog - like Traffic - he played.’
    • ‘He bristles when asked about the band's rabid experimentation with musical styles ranging from country to ska to speed metal to prog.’
    • ‘Rock music, prog especially, constantly attempts to evoke certain unearthly worlds via musical experimentation.’
    • ‘Battle lines are being drawn over this new symphonic prog rock as we speak.’
    • ‘Johnson's initial heyday was in the early 1970s when Pink Floyd and David Bowie grabbed the headlines with prog and glitter.’
    • ‘This kind of demented shoegazing stoner prog is all about the stomping rhythms and the elasticated, mind-bending guitars.’
    • ‘Before punk came along I'd fallen victim to the excesses of prog rock.’
    • ‘"Me, You and Everybody" successfully links the pastoral prog of old-school Yes with Delta blues.’
    • ‘Three chords have given us country songs, Irish pub balladry, prog, funk and more.’
  • 2US

    ‘if she decides to run, the hard-core progs will not support her anyway’
    short for progressive (sense 1 of the noun)
    • ‘I would hope the progs wouldn't blame the Dems if he lost.’
    • ‘I've never met a prog who understood how business worked.’
    • ‘Indonesia is not full of progs like we are.’
    • ‘The progs will rule to uphold the subsidies.’
    • ‘The closer we get to the elections, the more reluctant the progs will be to rock the boat.’

adjective

informal
  • Relating to or denoting rock music characterized by classical influences, the use of keyboard instruments, and lengthy compositions; progressive.

    ‘one of the most important prog albums of all time’
    ‘Tesseract sound very prog to me’
    • ‘But that still doesn't diminish the power of this celebration of all things prog: mystical geography, lava, free-form jamming, gongs.’
    • ‘At this point the band were more psychedelic fledglings than soaring prog jazz birds of paradise.’
    • ‘Hackett has got to be one of the more interesting guitarists in the prog movement.’
    • ‘This is raw and raucous rock - pounding drums, throttled prog riffs and breathy, hypnotic invocations.’
    • ‘But you can hear that it's done with passion by someone who's loved spacey electronic sounds ever since his parents introduced him to prog music as a child.’
    • ‘His second solo album is a full-blown prog epic that is equally confounding and captivating.’
    • ‘The 68-minute suite is eminently likeable, its prog tendencies harking back to melodic mid-'70s albums by the likes of Jean-Luc Ponty, while incorporating modern studio effects.’
    • ‘When did Kiss turn into a prog band?’

Origin

1950s (in sense 2): abbreviation of progressive.

Pronunciation

prog

/prɑɡ//präɡ/