Definition of profound in English:

profound

adjective

  • 1(of a state, quality, or emotion) very great or intense.

    ‘profound feelings of disquiet’
    ‘profound social changes’
    • ‘Please accept my profound regret and apology for any misunderstanding about that letter.’
    • ‘It was not only onstage that profound emotions stirred under a cool, unruffled surface.’
    • ‘Of course, our ignorance is so profound that little can be said for certain.’
    • ‘Such films can never have a profound influence on the viewers, he says.’
    • ‘Thus, differences in size have potentially profound implications for the ecology and fitness of large and small animals.’
    • ‘Grace had wonderful stories, but they always left her with a profound sadness.’
    • ‘For these women and for hundreds of other men and women who have experienced tremendous loss, the past year has piled myriad emotions on top of profound sadness.’
    • ‘Other projects could have a much more profound impact on the intellectual property landscape.’
    • ‘Then she was lying in bed at night trying to come to terms with this new and unwelcome emotion: profound sadness.’
    • ‘The workshop left me in a profound state of wonder at the subtlety and simplicity of this healing approach.’
    • ‘The fact is that the absence of a parent has a very profound effect.’
    • ‘Then in 1857 another event took place that was to have the most profound implications.’
    • ‘The most profound influence of archetypes is in their regulation of the human life cycle.’
    • ‘There is a profound fear of empowering consumers to share media in a self-organizing way on a mass scale.’
    • ‘I think it has quite profound implications for us as human beings.’
    • ‘Beyond these changes are two others, which may be equally profound in their implications.’
    • ‘Over the long term, they will make a far more profound impact.’
    • ‘The idea of negotiation, however, implies that the most profound changes may be extremely subtle.’
    • ‘The separation is so profound that there is no real basis for argument.’
    • ‘The experience had a very profound effect on me, both emotionally and spiritually.’
    heartfelt, intense, keen, great, very great, extreme, sincere, earnest, deep, deepest, deeply felt, wholehearted, acute, overpowering, overwhelming, deep-seated, deep-rooted, fervent, ardent
    far-reaching, radical, extensive, exhaustive, thoroughgoing, sweeping, life-changing
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    1. 1.1 (of a disease or disability) very severe; deep-seated.
      ‘a case of profound liver failure’
      • ‘St Mary of the Angels caters for clients with moderate, severe and profound intellectual disabilities.’
      • ‘They are the treatment of choice for many with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss.’
      • ‘Severe toxicity leads to coma, profound hypotension, bradycardia, and asystolic arrest.’
      • ‘The deformity may be so severe, the fractures so numerous, and the disability so profound, however, that almost any form of treatment deserves consideration.’
      • ‘There is also on-campus housing for children with multiple and profound disabilities who require a high level of support.’
      • ‘Nicholas's profound handicaps became evident soon after his birth.’
      • ‘Patients who are symptomatic can experience very high fever, rigors, profound hypotension, and often complain of nausea with or without diarrhea.’
      • ‘Most of the increased risk of infection is confined to those with liver cirrhosis, suppressed immune systems, or profound neutropenia.’
      • ‘Pat and his wife, Eva, have a 22-year-old daughter, Lisa, who has a profound disability called Angelman syndrome.’
      • ‘The patient also may have profound malaise, severe headaches, myalgias, and vague abdominal pain.’
      • ‘In sum, Singer calls for a radical reassessment of what to do with children born with severe and profound disabilities.’
      • ‘Surgery also may be an option for some children with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss.’
      • ‘It may be a child with a profound disability as well.’
      • ‘Vincent's disability is so profound he can't speak, has no use of his limbs, is not toilet trained and sleeps in a cot.’
      • ‘He suffered permanent brain damage and profound disability.’
      • ‘He developed exchange transfusion for the management of pregnant women with profound anaemia and cardiac failure.’
      • ‘A prolonged admission is likely to result in profound weakness and physical disability.’
      • ‘Muscular dystrophies are genetic disorders, usually progressive, which can lead to profound paralysis.’
      • ‘Doctors testified that Charlotte fell into the most extreme category of profound neurological disability.’
      • ‘There are about 123,000 people over 16 who were born hearing but have developed severe or profound deafness.’
      acute, very bad, serious, grave, critical, dire, drastic, grievous, extreme, dreadful, terrible, awful, frightful, appalling, sore
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  • 2(of a person or statement) having or showing great knowledge or insight.

    ‘a profound philosopher’
    • ‘It's a very profound statement for a lad of 21, but he's right.’
    • ‘Chief Seattle's reply has been described as the most beautiful and profound statement on the environment ever made.’
    • ‘The profound person understands what is moral.’
    • ‘I choose to interpret this not as a ‘marketing tip,’ but as a profound statement.’
    • ‘The stunning absence of the normally expected response was dramatic and perhaps the most profound statement of the series.’
    • ‘The reporter will quote the profound statements you make and soon you might even be on the cover of Newsweek!’
    • ‘One thing that keeps people in the cycle of rumination is a sense that they're incredibly profound and gaining tremendous insight.’
    • ‘Today, the profound thinker turns his attention to political apathy, and sees something dark filling the void.’
    • ‘Without realizing it, he made a very profound statement.’
    • ‘That's a very profound statement because if you talk to companies today, they say the customer's always right.’
    • ‘A daily paper in Florida made a profound statement on March 2.’
    • ‘John Paul didn't always need to make profound statements, however.’
    • ‘The most his character has going for him is to smile a lot and make supposedly profound statements on the nature of the universe that sound like they were read off the back of a cereal box.’
    • ‘Yet this wonderful and loving documentary somehow turns a demolition derby into a profound statement on the importance of life and what makes this place special.’
    • ‘He was not the only one to make a profound statement on the Victoria Falls.’
    • ‘I was very humbled that this man could make such a profound statement.’
    • ‘It is a profound statement about political integration and it will establish the EU as a legal entity in its own right.’
    • ‘You have someone who was illiterate making profound pronouncements and statements which are amazingly accurate about scientific nature.’
    • ‘Most intelligent critics of all schools who are familiar with his literary works agree that he was one of the most profound thinkers and learned writers of his time.’
    • ‘The answer by one student was so profound that the professor shared it with colleagues, via the Internet, which is, of course, why we now have the pleasure of enjoying it as well.’
    wise, learned, clever, intelligent, showing great knowledge, with great knowledge, knowledgeable, intellectual, scholarly, sage, sagacious, erudite, discerning, penetrating, perceptive, astute, thoughtful, full of insight, insightful, percipient, perspicacious, philosophical, deep
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    1. 2.1 (of a subject or thought) demanding deep study or thought.
      ‘expressing profound truths in simple language’
      • ‘Therefore there is time to think deep, profound thoughts.’
      • ‘One of the most profound ideas to emerge from World War Two was the emergence of an international human rights culture and legal system.’
      • ‘Then I realised I wouldn't have any profound thoughts.’
      • ‘Here I am, trying to be all serious, and she is laughing at my profound idea.’
      • ‘For me, this book is about the profound idea of a child hoping to navigate death, which is a very complicated, complex part of life.’
      • ‘It is a short book, written in one unbroken paragraph, but it explores profound ideas about individual responsibility, language and reality, and the nature of fiction.’
      • ‘Appearing on the second tablet, laws six through ten can be understood as teaching a profound idea if we study them in reverse order, from bottom to top.’
      • ‘As a medium to express profound ideas, it's secondary to a novel.’
      • ‘Actually this is a very difficult or profound question to answer.’
      • ‘Socrates raised profound questions in philosophy in a city square, and many of our liberation heroes took their majors in prison yards.’
      • ‘Quantum mechanics is one of the top two most profound ideas in the history of physics.’
      • ‘These projects are extremely important, and they raise profound questions regarding appropriate intellectual property policies.’
      • ‘The answer must be no, but again the impression of profound thought and relentless sifting of the ideas can only inspire respect.’
      • ‘These are very profound issues that we're dealing with, whether it's security of Australia or violence in indigenous communities.’
      • ‘Touching case studies demonstrate these profound truths.’
      • ‘This short paragraph does not even scratch the surface of a book that has many novel insights and profound ideas, and which opens up numerous lines for further inquiry.’
      • ‘This is very difficult as there are many more intelligent people who have had many more profound thoughts on the subject than I have.’
      • ‘The idea is more profound than one might normally expect from a child.’
      • ‘His profound ideas led him to some conclusions that strike the modern reader as bizarre, even absurd.’
      • ‘There are variations on these themes, but none that yields any profound insights.’
      complex, abstract, deep, weighty, serious, difficult
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  • 3archaic At, from, or extending to a great depth; very deep.

    ‘he opened the door with a profound bow’

noun

the profound
literary
  • The vast depth of the ocean or of the mind.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French profund, from Latin profundus ‘deep’, from Latin pro ‘before’ + fundus ‘bottom’. The word was used earliest in the sense ‘showing deep insight’.

Pronunciation

profound

/prəˈfound//prəˈfaʊnd/