Definition of profession in English:

profession

noun

  • 1A paid occupation, especially one that involves prolonged training and a formal qualification.

    ‘his chosen profession of teaching’
    ‘a lawyer by profession’
    • ‘A qualified nurse by profession, Annemarie had put in 16 years of service in various hospitals in Germany.’
    • ‘By profession he was a poet, and he'd appeared in Galway several times before - at poetry readings, unaccompanied by a band.’
    • ‘By profession I am a well-known book illustrator and artist.’
    • ‘By profession a hotelkeeper, the elder Parer on all accounts had the shrewd joviality of his calling.’
    • ‘Meanwhile US hacks have convinced themselves that they're involved in a profession rather than a craft.’
    • ‘We view teaching as a profession that requires formal training and certification.’
    • ‘By profession he is a barrister but he skilfully juggles so many other careers he ought to be in a circus.’
    • ‘They help build true partnerships across cultures, breaking down stereotypes of nationality, profession, and gender.’
    • ‘By profession she was a registered nurse and in later years moved into private practice in London.’
    • ‘At the heart of any profession is a body of expertise and abstract knowledge that its members are expected to apply within its granted jurisdiction.’
    career, occupation, calling, vocation, line of work, line of employment, line, métier
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    1. 1.1treated as singular or plural A body of people engaged in a particular profession.
      ‘the profession is divided on the issue’
      • ‘How can we mentor music students to enter the music profession?’
      • ‘The legal profession's peak body, the Law Council, called on judges to boycott the new regime.’
      • ‘The beleaguered legal profession demands a little respect.’
      • ‘Fr Byrne said the legal and medical professions, along with strong support from the community, should go a long way in addressing the drug problem in the town.’
      • ‘That is a very proper process, as essentially this is the constitution of the legal profession in our nation.’
      • ‘The veterinary profession is extremely important to New Zealand, and that is why I am pleased that the House has spent a considerable amount of time on this legislation.’
      • ‘Pharmacy programs are also encouraged to evaluate these practices to assure that the best candidates are entering the pharmacy profession.’
      • ‘After a few terms at Selma University, he settled in Montgomery where he first entered the undertaking profession.’
      • ‘She has been a leader and a pioneer in the American legal profession.’
      • ‘And you're also a mercy giver, because you wouldn't be involved in the nursing profession in an emergency room.’
      • ‘‘The awareness of diversity is an important element of training for the childcare profession,’ he noted.’
      • ‘Do we now have half of the health care profession engaged with this?’
      • ‘The regulatory bodies for the health professions should be run by councils that are primarily appointed.’
      • ‘The whole legal profession is old-fashioned, and steeped in old-fashioned language and mores.’
      • ‘The Law Society of Alberta, the regulatory body for the legal profession, says no complaints have been filed as of yet against anyone.’
      • ‘This review will be undertaken every five years and is led by the governing body of the medical profession, the General Medical Council.’
  • 2An act of declaring that one has a particular feeling or quality, especially when this is not the case.

    ‘his profession of delight rang hollow’
    ‘a profession of allegiance’
    • ‘The great point of that book was to deal with this problem of a false profession.’
    • ‘Nations have frequently tired of freedom and yielded themselves to tyrants, but not because of guileless trust in false professions.’
    • ‘In his professions, he claimed the Blair Witch had placed a hex on him, forcing him to commit the murders.’
    • ‘His first investigative office was closed only a few months after opening when the government launched a campaign to suppress the profession.’
    declaration, affirmation, statement, announcement, proclamation, assertion, avowal, vow, claim, allegation, protestation
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  • 3A declaration of belief in a religion.

    • ‘They think there is something illegitimate about anyone on the public payroll making open and passionate professions of their faith.’
    • ‘A direct profession of faith would be insufficiently impure, a denial of the brownness of real life.’
    • ‘Having ‘God’ in it divides us and attempts to link patriotism to public professions of religious belief.’
    • ‘The extraordinary thing about that is that her husband, though coming to all the meetings with her, makes no profession to be a Christian.’
    • ‘The religious rockers make many professions about the Lord Jesus Christ but as soon as the music starts, a transformation occurs as they are taken over by the spirit of Elvis Presley.’
    • ‘Hearing the Lord's voice takes us beyond mere religious profession or formal observances.’
    • ‘The name Evangelical derives from the profession of the Evangel - that is, the gospel.’
    • ‘These are dynamic, like riding the waves of the sea, the source of salt, not static, like acquiring and holding a special position by reason of religious profession.’
    • ‘On the basis of our repentance and profession of faith in Christ, God regards us as acceptable and pleasing in His sight.’
    • ‘The wicked world pursue their evil cause boldly, but alas! the people of God shame their honourable cause and profession by their cowardice.’
    • ‘Living ‘by faith in’ suggests that faith is a profession to be asserted, a willed thing.’
    • ‘Can there be a credible Christian profession if there is no love?’
    • ‘The Irish Constitution guarantees freedom of conscience and the free profession and practice of religion.’
    • ‘Testimonials give greater emphasis and personalize professions of beliefs as proof to support the veracity of a particular claim.’
    • ‘Rather, they imply sincerity in our profession of Christ as Saviour and Lord.’
    • ‘Although not a Christian by profession, Jaspers' philosophy was Christian in many of its tenets, and he was also systematically Kantian.’
    • ‘It would be bad faith to suggest that contemporary evangelicals' profession of faith in a life to come or in another world is bad faith.’
    • ‘Generally, chaplains of any faith can gain access to local religious leaders since religion and a profession of faith are the common bonds.’
    • ‘First, they need to acknowledge that their initial profession of Jesus' Messiahship is inadequate.’
    • ‘In joining the Church he made a genuine and honest profession of faith - but he did not experience it as entry into a true community of faith.’
    statement, sworn statement, affidavit, attestation, affirmation, assertion
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    1. 3.1 The declaration or vows made on entering a religious order.
      • ‘Ironically, religious profession and the renuncia could create an opportunity for women to administer property autonomously.’
    2. 3.2 The ceremony or fact of being professed in a religious order.
      • ‘At solemn profession, I placed my hands in those of my prioress, professing to live my vows usque ad mortem, until death.’
      • ‘Also celebrating her 50th Anniversary of religious profession, Sister Edna O'Connor, a native of Irishtown.’

Phrases

  • the oldest profession

    • humorous The practice of working as a prostitute.

      • ‘A young lady, a practitioner of the world's oldest profession, is plying her trade on a cold Fort Ave.’
      • ‘It feels that the crackdown will drive prostitution and brothels even further underground, making the oldest profession even more dangerous for both the women and their punters.’
      • ‘The network of courtesans, musicians and artists hitherto thriving on royal patronage were reduced to penury; and were forced to turn to the world's oldest profession.’
      • ‘Even though love-at-work is as old as the world's oldest profession, the days of women being suspected of sleeping their way to the middle are not over.’
      • ‘To assist them they enlist the aid of Rahab, an inhabitant of Jericho, and a practitioner of the world's oldest profession.’
      • ‘Yes, the oldest profession (even when it's called ‘escort’) is, ‘Society’ wise, not the most respected.’
      • ‘One ‘customer’ appeared to be a working woman of the oldest profession, plying her trade indoors in the air conditioned restaurant instead of outside on a street corner in the heat.’
      • ‘Love for Sale, first published in Norwegian in 1997, is nothing if not ambitious, attempting as it does to cover all aspects of the world's oldest profession, at all times and in all places.’
      • ‘However, the lure of increased tax revenues is evidently not enough to overcome misgivings about permitting the world's oldest profession equal status on today's job market.’
      • ‘And in Belle de Jour and Hustle, Deneuve depicts two diametrically opposed versions of the world's oldest profession, both of which defy conventional interpretations.’

Origin

Middle English (denoting the vow made on entering a religious order): via Old French from Latin professio(n-), from profiteri ‘declare publicly’ (see profess). profession (sense 1) derives from the notion of an occupation that one ‘professes’ to be skilled in.

Pronunciation

profession

/prəˈfɛʃən//prəˈfeSHən/