Definition of proclaim in US English:

proclaim

verb

  • 1with clause Announce officially or publicly.

    ‘the joint manifesto proclaimed that imperialism would be the coalition's chief objective’
    with object ‘army commanders proclaimed a state of emergency’
    • ‘Publicly, the State Department proclaims that one of its ‘most essential tasks’ is to provide assistance to U.S. citizens incarcerated abroad.’
    • ‘Lastly, there is Pakistan's loudly proclaimed intention of using nuclear weapons at the slightest provocation.’
    • ‘The Army, in Cromwell's presence, proclaimed that they would put the king on trial as soon as they were in a position to do so.’
    • ‘MicronPC, the USA's third biggest direct PC vendor, this week proclaimed its second profitable quarter in a row.’
    • ‘Despite the IMF's recently proclaimed commitment to eradicating poverty, Fund officials were sharply critical of the plan.’
    • ‘The Washington Post and some other media in Hong Kong are proclaiming that Vote Favors Independent Taiwan which I don't think is necessarily true.’
    • ‘In the afternoon a banner proclaiming his victory is unrolled and held by supporters.’
    • ‘Al-Jazeera broadcast a videotape in which he proclaimed that the United States will be defeated in Iraq and Afghanistan.’
    • ‘Figuring out the variables previously mentioned, the Army proclaimed that the sound barrier had been broken.’
    • ‘The bill also authorized the president to proclaim that Americans traveling on belligerents' ships did so at their own risk.’
    • ‘Oil and Gas Journal's editor, Bob Tippee, proclaims that commodity markets work.’
    • ‘In its November 26 announcement, the National Bureau of Economic Research proclaimed that the recession had begun last March.’
    • ‘William Hague can proclaim that he will cut taxes and boost spending until he is blue in the face.’
    • ‘Waving to his cheering troops, he officially proclaimed victory over Iraq.’
    • ‘Suddenly the announcer proclaimed that Beezer had been selected in the fourth round by the Rangers.’
    • ‘The announcer proclaimed that Ty Roberts was up to bat.’
    • ‘As her manifesto proclaimed: ‘I do not see it as my job to invent problems for women to be afraid of.’’
    • ‘And despite frantic efforts to resuscitate him, after 45 minutes the international official was proclaimed dead.’
    • ‘Why not proclaim to the world in decisive terms our own importance?’
    • ‘President Woodrow Wilson, in 1914, made an official announcement proclaiming Mother's Day as a national holiday that was to be held on second Sunday of May.’
    publicize, make public, make known, give publicity to, bill, post, announce, broadcast, trumpet, shout from the rooftops, give notice of, call attention to, promulgate
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    1. 1.1 Declare something one considers important with due emphasis.
      ‘she proclaimed that what I had said was untrue’
      with object and infinitive ‘he proclaimed the car to be in sound condition’
      • ‘When the discovery of the giant comet Hale-Bopp was announced in 1995, Nancy proclaimed that it didn't exist.’
      • ‘When they are captured, they will often loudly proclaim their innocence.’
      • ‘Even some go so far as to proclaim that communism is a state form of Christianity.’
      • ‘Opposition immediately arose in the astronomical community, which proclaimed that such money would be better spent on telescopes.’
      • ‘The Foundation proclaims that through this and other early work Sherman ‘set a new agenda for contemporary photography.’’
      • ‘Not so long ago, some techies proclaimed that communications technology and the Web would make geography irrelevant.’
      • ‘Cars sprayed with paint proclaiming love and support line the lane leading through the Los Olivos valley to his home.’
      • ‘In her Washington Post column the morning after Powell spoke, Mary McGrory proclaimed that ‘he persuaded me.’’
      • ‘A bumper sticker on Plant's car proclaims, ‘Oysters are Habitat Forming.’’
      • ‘It is too early to proclaim that things are spinning into control on the nonproliferation front.’
      • ‘Fifty years ago people had difficulty ‘accepting’ inter-racial marriages, and today publicly proclaiming that intolerant view is not acceptable.’
      • ‘The publishing firm which carries his name, Calder Publications, modestly proclaims that it publishes ‘the most significant literature of the twentieth century.’’
      • ‘For instance, their campaign booklet proclaims that ‘today, successful sires are required to impregnate hundreds of mares every year’.’
      • ‘Prior to his assassination, he had proclaimed that Guinea-Bissau would declare its independence from Portugal in that year.’
      • ‘The Declaration of Independence, written by Thomas Jefferson, proclaims that Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness, are God given rights.’
      • ‘She proudly proclaims that she was once in public relations for the nuclear industry.’
      • ‘Cub fans are everywhere, proudly proclaiming their loyalty to what outsiders perceive as a lost cause.’
      • ‘The death of Princess Diana set off an explosion that jolted many reporters into proclaiming that human feelings matter - a lot.’
      • ‘All those Africa charity ads proclaim the same message.’
      • ‘This declaration proclaims that all individuals are equal and entitled to certain freedoms and rights, both socially and culturally.’
      speak, utter, say, voice, state, declare
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    2. 1.2with object and complement Declare officially or publicly to be.
      ‘he proclaimed James II as King of England’
      • ‘Marbury this year publicly proclaimed himself the best point guard in the N.B.A.’
      • ‘In 1769 a Mamluk leader, Ali Bey, proclaimed himself sultan, declaring independence from the Ottomans.’
      • ‘I'm officially proclaiming this the first day of my summer and am sitting here in a vest.’
      • ‘Many of the original mesmerists were signatories to the first declarations proclaiming the French revolution in 1789.’
      • ‘The new regime, called the People's Republic of China, was officially proclaimed on October 1, 1949.’
      • ‘However, in that year, senior air force officials proclaimed April 9 as Royal Thai Air Force Day, relegating March 27 to Commemoration Day.’
      • ‘In 380, Christianity had been proclaimed the official religion of the eastern Empire.’
      • ‘Nigeria's electoral commission has officially proclaimed incumbent president Olusegun Obasanjo the winner of the country's presidential poll.’
      • ‘This article is more concerned with the way the Bible is proclaimed publicly and preached than with its treatment as the object of study and teaching in the academy.’
      • ‘Though Weiszacker publicly proclaimed German guilt, he had successfully expanded the scope of victims to include all Germans.’
      • ‘Durbin misstates Catholic doctrine on both abortion and the death penalty, yet still publicly proclaims himself a ‘practicing Catholic’.’
      • ‘The Kingdom of Italy was officially proclaimed on 17 March 1861, by a parliament sitting in Turin.’
      • ‘They travel around the world proclaiming the gospel and declaring their hope for a future when health can be restored.’
      • ‘Based on the 1999 data, government officials have proclaimed the poor the winners of the 1990s economic boom.’
      • ‘Hey, there, Karyn and A.J. Well, the celebration officially proclaiming Prince Albert II ruler of Monaco has begun.’
      • ‘On December 10, 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.’
      • ‘The town was officially proclaimed on 21 March 1878.’
      • ‘Other Canadian towns and cities have been criticized for refusing to officially proclaim gay pride days.’
      • ‘European courts declared each war and proclaimed each peace, but were slow to undertake serious fighting in North America.’
      • ‘After Edward's death on 6 July 1553, she was proclaimed queen and Guildford declared himself king.’
      declare, announce, pronounce, state, make known, give out, advertise, publish, broadcast, promulgate, trumpet, blazon, blaze, shout something from the rooftops
      declare, pronounce, announce
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    3. 1.3with object Demonstrate or indicate clearly.
      ‘the decor proclaimed a family history of taste and tradition’
      with object and complement ‘he had a rolling gait that proclaimed him a man of the sea’
      • ‘Everything the two of them did clearly proclaimed how in love they were.’
      • ‘There was another roll of thunder proclaiming the gods' anger.’
      • ‘Band concerts, parades, ceremonies around liberty trees, patriotic plays, and slogans on official stationery proclaimed that concern.’
      • ‘We now invoke a deity when we recite our Pledge of Allegiance, and our currency clearly proclaims the basis of our laws; can compulsory adherence to Christianity be far behind?’
      • ‘Even when you are unhappy, your very being proclaims your strength.’
      • ‘The message of happy family living is proclaimed loudly as the reality of violence is all but dismissed.’
      demonstrate, indicate, show, signify, reveal, testify to, manifest, betray
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Origin

Late Middle English proclame, from Latin proclamare ‘cry out’, from pro- ‘forth’ + clamare ‘to shout’. The change in the second syllable was due to association with the verb claim.

Pronunciation