Definition of procession in US English:

procession

noun

  • 1A number of people or vehicles moving forward in an orderly fashion, especially as part of a ceremony or festival.

    ‘a funeral procession’
    • ‘Thousands marched behind his funeral procession, a measure of his extraordinary impact on Russia's very heart, soul, and mind.’
    • ‘A car bomber drove his vehicle into a funeral procession, a funeral procession for one of the local prominent tribal leaders there.’
    • ‘A torchlight procession, a religious ceremony and blessing mark the day that Saint Dévoe is believed to have arrived in Monaco.’
    • ‘The purpose of cursus monuments is unclear, but it is assumed they were used for parades or some kind of ceremony which involved processions.’
    • ‘The ceremony began with a procession from the local community centre to the church followed by special devotions in the church.’
    • ‘In a break with Royal tradition the Princess Royal will also join the procession, a ceremony usually reserved for men.’
    • ‘The opening ceremony included a procession down the High Street by the society's fleet of funeral vehicles to the sound of a piper major.’
    • ‘And ever since then I have held little regard for all the pomp and ceremony of military processions and patriotism.’
    • ‘The ceremony begins with a procession from your college to the Senate House (a short walk in our case).’
    • ‘The pupils from the two schools joined together in singing, reading, praying and processions to make the ceremony beautiful.’
    • ‘Events will include a civic procession and wreath laying ceremony on Saturday followed by a civic service at St Charles Borromeo to celebrate Wilberforce's life and work.’
    • ‘The common law allows orderly protests, processions, petitions and so forth - and these blockades were entirely orderly.’
    • ‘At burial ceremonies several processions, each one associated with a grade of the society, go from the lodge to the burial place.’
    • ‘When the most famous composer of the age died, about thirty thousand mourners were present at the funeral procession on March 26, 1827.’
    • ‘The London procession and ceremony were being televised live - TV cameras were allowed into Westminster Abbey for the first time.’
    • ‘Catholic countries like Spain make the most of the holy season (semana santa) with torchlit processions and extravagant religious ceremonies.’
    • ‘The procession followed a private ceremony, attended by about 200 family and friends.’
    • ‘The 60-minute performances feature traditional dances of the four regions, a wedding ceremony, wedding processions and a sword fight.’
    • ‘Five thousand admirers marched in his funeral procession and Poole became a martyr for anti-immigrant nativists.’
    • ‘A Yorkshire soldier will have a key place in the guiding of the ceremonial gun to be used for the procession and funeral of the Queen Mother.’
    parade, march, cavalcade, motorcade, carcade, cortège
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The action of moving forward as part of a ceremony.
      ‘the fully robed civic dignitaries walk in procession’
      • ‘After the vigil Mass on Saturday evening, the Blessed Sacrament will be carried in procession through Sheridan Park, not through Bohola village.’
      • ‘Much interest was centred in the event and when the candidates left in procession for the church from the school, Churchgate was packed with onlookers.’
      • ‘From about 9: 00 a.m. groups of men arriving in procession formed circles.’
      • ‘Following the Mass, parishioners will march in procession as one body to the Convent of Mercy where Benediction will be imparted.’
      • ‘The idol was, and is, annually dragged forth in procession on a monstrous car, and as masses of excited pilgrims crowded round to drag or accompany it, accidents occurred.’
      • ‘We could see, for instance, the doddering old knights and dames of the order tottering in (none of them a day below 70 I'm sure) in procession.’
      • ‘An annual procession of vintage commercial vehicles will travel through the district on Sunday.’
      • ‘A congregation of several hundred people attended the usual evening mass at St Mary's and said the rosary after the statue was brought into the church in procession.’
      • ‘It has a man being taken in procession down the platform, garland round his neck and a young girl leading him, men running backwards taking photographs.’
      • ‘Domonic and his friends and family will leave Lyneham in procession at 10 am and will be followed by a tractor decorated with balloons and banners.’
      • ‘On the 10th day, the ruler, in silk and priceless gems, wended his way in procession through the crowded streets on the gorgeously caparisoned elephant.’
      • ‘On February 20, 1956, to the delight of all the people of Melaka, they were taken in procession to a square opposite the Club.’
      • ‘In glorious sunshine we joined in procession with the bridal car, its traditional wedding doll, sitting on the bonnet.’
      • ‘The procession of about 50 vehicles, each one full of mourners, made its way from Clifton to St Oswald's Church, through Bell Farm.’
      • ‘Since I was well back in the procession of creeping vehicles, it took me a while to figure out what the hold-up was.’
      • ‘Prior to the Mass the First Communion and Confirmation children, along with the priest, marched in procession into the field headed by a piper.’
      • ‘Braving scorching sun, the differently abled children came in procession from Subashnagar area to the district Collectorate this afternoon.’
      • ‘If you go for breakfast around 7 in the morning, you'll see the saffron-clothed local monks in procession down the street, collecting their daily alms.’
      • ‘Not only did the residents accord a warm reception to the artistes, there were several volunteers to act out a scene where the bridegroom is taken out in procession in a car.’
      • ‘On September 18, all the idols would be taken in procession and immersed in River Cauvery.’
    2. 1.2 A relentless succession of people or things.
      ‘his path was paved by a procession of industry executives’
      • ‘He makes us feel good about not liking French people by dressing up in ridiculous national costumes and acting dumb while interviewing a procession of stereotypical Eurofreaks.’
      • ‘Bringing home a procession of awful, awful, awful boyfriends.’
      • ‘Town Hall Square will host a performance by theatre groups Keighley Amateurs and HYT, a Bavarian oompah band and, after dusk, a procession of light.’
      • ‘Above them streamed a procession of ghosts, one of whom had trailed a foot through Draco's shoulder on the way past, as many as twenty or twenty-five of them.’
      • ‘The magazine glorifies a procession of vaunted rebels for struggling to persuade a corporate hierarchy to let them generate profits.’
      • ‘The shores of the Bosphorus were lined with fishermen and a procession of large, slow-moving families enjoying the unusually fine weather.’
      • ‘There's been a procession of Presidents, Prime Ministers and politicians ‘visiting the troops’ in Iraq recently.’
      • ‘They streamed away like a procession of stars on the dark waters.’
      • ‘Marcus repeatedly casts life as a kind of death already, a procession of meaningless occurrences.’
      • ‘It was the start of a string of five highly autobiographical films, a form of exorcism on his part for a painful upbringing at the hands of an abusive father and a procession of school bullies.’
      • ‘The main events take place in the cabaret lounge, where we enjoyed a procession of quality acts during our week-long stay, the ballrooms and the smaller side rooms.’
      • ‘These were not quite living men, these wanderers in that fog: they were a dream, a mystery, a procession of shadows over a black sky.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, a procession of alliance spokesmen have appeared on TV to plead for US assistance.’
      • ‘Forgive me if I have, but I have heard a procession of pro-government Israelis pop up on the radio to put the same case with slightly different vocal patterns.’
      • ‘Her poetry anthology Enough Rope was a bestseller and her life was a procession of speakeasies, doomed affairs and half-hearted suicide attempts.’
      • ‘As he beds a procession of desperate chorus girls and barmaids, his long-suffering wife, Phoebe, drinks herself into oblivion in their ramshackle bedsit.’
      • ‘Nowadays every lunchtime sees a procession of pupils to the fast-food shops, where they purchase their batter-covered burgers and greasy chips.’
      • ‘That was all Carlin had to do before picking the ball out of the net with seven minutes remaining as the game deteriorated into a series of hopeful and hopeless long balls and a procession of errant passes.’
      • ‘A procession of central bankers and finance ministers issued soothing words, united in their confidence that the prospects for the global economy remained good.’
      • ‘As a result, Calle 54 is a procession of performances by different musicians, staged especially for Trueba's camera.’
      series, succession, stream, steady stream, string, sequence, chain, run
      View synonyms
  • 2Theology
    The emanation of the Holy Spirit.

    • ‘From the formality of the opening procession to the intimacy of Communion, God wants to fill our hearts and minds with his truth, his love, and his power.’
    • ‘At this point Pope Hadrian I defended the doctrine of procession through the Son against Charlemagne.’
    • ‘First at Ferrara and later at Florence, fourteen months were spent in discussing the procession of the Spirit, more time than was devoted to any other issue!’
    • ‘On the filioque controversy, Bulgakov demonstrates that the East did not have a formal theology for the procession of the Holy Spirit.’
    • ‘Verse 27 invites us to bind the festal procession with branches, gathering up Palm Sunday as well as Good Friday.’

Origin

Late Old English, via Old French from Latin processio(n-), from procedere ‘move forward’ (see proceed).

Pronunciation

procession

/prəˈseSHən//prəˈsɛʃən/