Definition of pristine in English:

pristine

adjective

  • 1In its original condition; unspoiled.

    ‘pristine copies of an early magazine’
    • ‘The barge itself was in pristine condition enhanced by being in full sail.’
    • ‘In addition the Town Council also ensured that the cemetery was in pristine condition.’
    • ‘At least if they remain in pristine condition, they may have a resale value to collectors in about 50 years' time.’
    • ‘The pristine condition of these seals indicates that they were never actually used.’
    • ‘While you may come across a 17th century object in pristine condition, the odds are against it.’
    • ‘Many of these shallower coral reefs are in pristine condition.’
    • ‘What I do know is that Muirfield is in pristine condition and has been beautifully presented.’
    • ‘Remember that land once built on can never be restored to its pristine condition.’
    • ‘Sad to report, it was sold in its original box, its pristine condition signalling that it had never been opened.’
    • ‘However, the figures must be in pristine condition - the soft chalk chips easily and it is too expensive to restore.’
    • ‘The pitch is in pristine condition and it was a thrill for both teams to be able to play good hurling on such a good surface.’
    • ‘Salt water and alcohol were used to restore them to the sparkling, pristine condition in which they can now be seen.’
    • ‘Needless to say, the vehicle was not in its original pristine condition upon its return.’
    • ‘I just kept the wonderful black and gold address book in its pristine condition as a souvenir.’
    • ‘The interiors of the church remain the same and have been maintained in pristine condition.’
    • ‘It has been kept in pristine condition in recent years thanks to the diligent work of the local graveyard committee.’
    • ‘These factors have helped to preserve the reefs and they remain in pristine condition.’
    • ‘Mr Minningham said that the bottle was in pristine condition, having been removed only once from its commemorative box.’
    • ‘He is that indecent thing, a man whose dreams not only came true ludicrously early but remain in pristine condition.’
    • ‘My teeth are in good condition, pristine for a Glasgwegian, my dentist says.’
    1. 1.1Clean and fresh as if new; spotless.
      ‘a pristine white shirt’
      • ‘The quiet, unobtrusive Scot has gone about his task of having the course in pristine condition.’
      • ‘Really, however, it's up to us and our visitors to keep the beaches in pristine condition.’
      • ‘What started as a pristine white shirt on Thursday morning was now really grimy.’
      • ‘He never had black circles under his eyes, nary a spot, and the white coat was always pristine and uncrumpled.’
      • ‘The walls were white and actually quite pristine - Reuben had never seen such clean walls before.’
      • ‘Jasmine returned her gaze toward the pristine white of the table cloth, her heart in her shoes.’
      • ‘Her normally pristine white hair was matted and stringy and streaked with gray.’
      • ‘His face and once pristine white school shirt were drenched in blood.’
      • ‘All the defendants were dressed identically in grey jogging trousers and pristine white T-shirts or jumpers.’
      • ‘Clean bars of soap, pristine white seats and a little hook to hang up your bag and jacket.’
      • ‘Her eyes roamed over the coloured marker defacing the formerly pristine white walls.’
      • ‘The streets might not be pristine clean but they are a lot better than they used to be.’
      • ‘As the morning passed the bags began to fill and the roadsides were returned to their pristine condition once more.’
      • ‘Not fraud, exactly, but neither is it pukka science deserving of that pristine white coat.’
      • ‘His whites are pristine despite seven hours of food preparation.’
      • ‘He has been responsible for the pristine condition of the Liffeyside Park.’
      • ‘Since it was out of the way of the dust, debris and workmen, it allowed Heidi to keep her hair and dress in pristine condition.’
      • ‘With its pristine white walls and hardwood floors, I was very envious of him and his place.’
      • ‘It's a hopeful sign if their wardrobes contain a pristine row of white shirts, or monochrome cashmere.’
      • ‘Harrington was out early in the morning when the greens were in pristine condition.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense original, former, primitive and undeveloped): from Latin pristinus former The senses unspoiled and spotless date from the 1920s.

Pronunciation:

pristine

/priˈstēn//ˈprisˌtēn/