Definition of primula in English:

primula

noun

  • A plant of a genus that includes primroses, cowslips, and cyclamens. Many kinds are cultivated as ornamentals, bearing flowers in a wide variety of colors in the spring.

    • ‘A large variety of shrubs have already been planted in the garden including thistles, dogrose, wild primulas and teasel.’
    • ‘It is time to plant out the primulas and primroses potted up from the garden when they finished flowering in late spring.’
    • ‘And everywhere I look there are primulas and polyanthus showing their bright little flowers.’
    • ‘You can use a combination of plants: primulas, cyclamen, heathers and ivy are all useful for winter colour.’
    • ‘Spring flowering plants that grow well in baskets located in a sunny spot include alyssum, lobelia, pansies, primulas and bedding begonias.’
    • ‘Hardy spring bedding such as forget-me-nots, primulas, wallflowers, sweet williams and violas can be planted to fill gaps left by the removal of summer bedding.’
    • ‘In the 18th century, the unassuming, humble terracotta flower pot was used to grow, amongst other things, auricula primulas.’
    • ‘A plaque was also donated and primulas were planted at the garden which will bloom each year.’
    • ‘Divide primula and polyanthus after flowering, and move any that are badly placed’
    • ‘Underneath are Himalayan poppies Meconopsis, primulas and trilliums, many of them also collected from the wild.’
    • ‘Other jobs include dividing primulas and polyanthus once they have finished flowering.’
    • ‘Superb instant effects can be achieved by using semi-advanced seedlings of annual flowers such as lobelia, marigolds, pansies and primulas, which are all low-growing and suitable for containers.’
    • ‘Polyanthus primulas and pansies make for a reliable show.’
    • ‘One of the most valuable of these spring flowering perennials is the primula.’
    • ‘Following our pale primrose are the Wanda primulas, very attractive plants with very dark, often evergreen, crinkled leaves and rich flowers in shades of purple, pink and red as well as white and yellow.’
    • ‘Their favourite was the rose, followed by hellebores, peonies, clematis, magnolias, lilies, euphorbias, primulas, snowdrops, geraniums.’
    • ‘Around this time of year, there is a good show of daffodils, tulips, primroses, primula, helibores orientalis and other spring flowers.’
    • ‘The garden is full of marigolds, pansies, dahlias, primulas and nasturtiums, as well as shrub roses and climbers.’
    • ‘The white winter flowering heather and pink cyclamen had faded but were soon replaced by violas, primulas and grape hyacinth.’
    • ‘The combination of bedding plants such as primulas, violas and forget-me-nots, combined with bulbs such as hyacinth and dwarf tulips, can make a very bright and attractive display.’

Origin

Modern Latin, from medieval Latin, feminine of primulus, diminutive of primus first.

Pronunciation:

primula

/ˈprimyələ/