Definition of pride in English:



  • 1A feeling or deep pleasure or satisfaction derived from one's own achievements, the achievements of those with whom one is closely associated, or from qualities or possessions that are widely admired.

    ‘the team was bursting with pride after recording a sensational victory’
    ‘a woman who takes great pride in her appearance’
    • ‘He had a great sense of pride in the achievements of Saga and I am glad that he was able to be part of our celebrations and to meet many customers who wanted the opportunity to express their gratitude and respect for his work.’
    • ‘He recalls how the young woman's aim was to travel further west, to awaken a sense of pride and importance among the islanders, in their culture, language and education.’
    • ‘With the right support, we can all take pride in our achievements, whether they are in the classroom or on a playing field.’
    • ‘Pictures of the band's success adorned the windows of the cafe, which was a reflection of the family's pride in Shane's achievements with the band.’
    • ‘The driving motive force behind any country's sense of achievement and pride in its efforts must come from a focus on entrepreneurship.’
    • ‘The pride of a big library often rests on the number of books it has, he points out.’
    • ‘No one takes more pride in my achievements than my mother.’
    • ‘I'm not suggesting that we become elitist; but there is no reason not to take pride in your achievements and to strive for the top, not just a high place.’
    • ‘This does not imply that he was without an acute sense of selfhood, personal vanity, or justified pride in his achievement.’
    • ‘It has been 50 years since the young men of the University of Texas reached the semi-finals, and a fair degree of pride has underlined their achievements.’
    • ‘Some people, thank goodness, take a good deal of pride and pleasure in achieving and maintaining a perfect filing system.’
    • ‘She said: ‘Everyone has a real sense of achievement and pride and I'm so proud of my small team for their hard work and commitment.’’
    • ‘At the launch on Tuesday headteacher Diana Morton expressed her pride at the achievement.’
    • ‘We usually take pride in our past achievements, without realizing the hard fact that we should get ourselves fully prepared to face new challenges.’
    • ‘The positive tribal virtues were absolute loyalty and obedience to tribe and king, and pride in their achievements.’
    • ‘There are others, plenty of them, but with direct ties to every team left in the race for the Super Bowl, you can see why Lenti has to be close to bursting with pride.’
    • ‘The other man took the piece of paper and moved off, while the trader glowed with pride at having closed yet another excellent deal.’
    • ‘Yet, for all her many achievements, it's being part of Southampton's project to establish special schools from which she derives the most professional pride.’
    • ‘Allow yourself to take pride in your own achievements.’
    • ‘Not only is there tremendous pride in Amir's achievements but dozens of youngsters want to be just like him.’
    pleasure, joy, delight, gratification, fulfilment, satisfaction, sense of achievement
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    1. 1.1The consciousness of one's own dignity.
      ‘he swallowed his pride and asked for help’
      • ‘My last sight of that wonderful, imposing woman and those beautiful children doing their work with pride and dignity is one I will never forget.’
      • ‘But we went down with colours flying and lost with grace, pride and dignity.’
      • ‘The lead character of the King just stole the picture: his dignity and pride were evident in every frame by his natural presence on screen.’
      • ‘It is those qualities of pride and integrity that he brings out in all of us.’
      • ‘The Kalinka dance segment, accompanied by the popular Russian folk song and performed with flair and razor sharp precision, epitomised pride, dignity and honour.’
      • ‘Here, tonight, I write to you stripped of all dignity and pride, in an unmitigated plea for help.’
      • ‘At the end of what had been a tremendous battle, with both men having given their all, Hatton had retained his title but Phillips had kept his dignity and pride.’
      • ‘His involvement in injury management has assisted many employees to maintain dignity and pride while recovering from a work related injury.’
      • ‘I think, for the most part, they're opportunists without much dignity or pride, people who would sell out their own kind to get ahead.’
      • ‘She carried herself with pride and dignity, no matter what, and always wore clothes of the day that were very conservative.’
      • ‘When he finally did reach the doorway he stood in it, glancing back at the room of his child, overcome with emotions of pride, fear, hope, happiness and also, loneliness.’
      • ‘But, have you ever had anyone try to make a mockery of you, try to take away your dignity, your pride, your own self-worth?’
      • ‘Emotions of fear, anticipation, and excitement silenced the team, as they walked with pride and dignity through the campus halls.’
      • ‘I know he had a poor quality of life and probably suffered a loss of dignity and pride.’
      • ‘She should have been allowed to retire with dignity and pride.’
      • ‘It is important to take pride in ourselves, our appearance, our conduct and our work.’
      • ‘Through it, the Dalits have come to acquire a dignity and pride that is unprecedented, but by no means overdue.’
      • ‘You can get back your pride and your dignity and your self-esteem.’
      • ‘In youth, affronts to their dignity or pride are often met with disproportionate anger, and sometimes with revenge.’
      • ‘The winner is chosen more for her inner qualities, such as her charm, pride, independence, and genuine nature.’
      self-esteem, dignity, honour, self-respect, ego, self-worth, self-image, self-identity, self-regard, pride in oneself, pride in one's abilities, belief in one's worth, faith in oneself
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    2. 1.2The quality of having an excessively high opinion of oneself or one's importance.
      ‘the sin of pride’
      • ‘I had committed the cardinal sin of pride and this was my punishment.’
      • ‘Louise and I never say sorry to each other which is strange but at least none of us has to swallow our prides.’
      • ‘Everyone in this facility yields to the seven deadly sins… especially pride and vanity!’
      • ‘How can we differentiate humility from excessive pride?’
      • ‘But we should always guard against the sin of intellectual pride, which leads to ideological thinking.’
      • ‘A heart full of false pride, vanity and arrogance has no room for wisdom, so it will remain lost in the darkness.’
      • ‘Except for a few bruised prides and egos, they all landed safe and sound.’
      • ‘Any excessive display could be construed as the sin of pride and any unnecessary revealing or emphasizing of the body could be deemed a provocation to immoral behaviour.’
      • ‘The ancient Greeks had a word for it - hubris which means excessive pride, arrogance.’
      • ‘Over the centuries, the church refined his list to the current seven: anger, gluttony, sloth, envy, pride, lust and greed.’
      • ‘They said it in their book, the way it used to be written: pride is a sin.’
      • ‘He's a talkative guy and obviously enamored with his own film, but in my opinion, that pride is justified.’
      • ‘In short, I was observing that human beings are never more in danger of the sin of pride than when they are really and truly right.’
      • ‘More and more skippers swallowed their prides, converted their trawlers and diversified into shellfish.’
      • ‘Both condemn the sin of pride and its consequences.’
      • ‘He suffers from what the Greeks called hybris, and arrogant pride characterized by a man stepping out of his proper place in the world.’
      • ‘Autobiographies of overly ambitious youth relate how they were harassed by their classmates and warned against the sin of pride by the priest and nuns.’
      • ‘We should allow ourselves a moment to revel in the sin of pride.’
      • ‘Aware, perhaps, that stories need interpretation, Augustine spells out the lesson about the sin of pride.’
      • ‘St Thomas Aquinas, the medieval theologian who shaped society's thinking on the deadly sins, rated pride as the worst of all.’
      arrogance, vanity, self-importance, hubris, self-conceit, conceit, conceitedness, self-love, self-glorification, self-adulation, self-admiration, narcissism, egotism, presumption, superciliousness, haughtiness, snobbery, snobbishness
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    3. 1.3A person or thing that is the object or source of a feeling or deep pleasure or satisfaction.
      ‘the swimming pool is the pride of the community’
      • ‘The pride of Carlow Town will come under review in 2002, when their commitment to flower power is put to the test as part of the annual Floral Pride Competition.’
      • ‘The Ivory Coast, the world's biggest producer of cocoa, had been the pride of France's former colonial empire for decades after independence in 1960.’
      • ‘Zhou has become the pride of Shanghai and in March she was again in the limelight when the city selected her out of 771 women as one of its top 10 women pacesetters.’
      • ‘The pride of Attica Academy was the soccer team, and our social events revolved around them during the season.’
      • ‘The pride of Seville is the graceful 13th century Tower of Gold that guards the east bank.’
      • ‘The pride of worldly success will not bring any lasting peace and can quite easily destroy a person's soul.’
      • ‘The photograph of those four fish is still one of the prides of my collection.’
      • ‘The pride of the course is a parade ring with lush green grass.’
      • ‘The pride of China's naval fleet, wags say, incorporates the very latest in radar-evading stealth technology, so powerful it is as if it didn't even exist.’
      • ‘The pride of the museum's collection was a figurehead from a Florentine galleon, captured by Pirates from Danzig in 1473.’
      • ‘The pride of Laurie Callender's motorcycle collection is that first little Mountain Goat.’
      • ‘The pride of the park's collection are the Sumatran tigers, and their enclosure has been planned to give the animals space and privacy, while offering visitors an exciting view.’
      • ‘Bollin Eric, the pride of Yorkshire, would be a fitting and popular winner of tomorrow's Yorkshire Cup on the third and final day of the May Festival.’
      • ‘The pride of their Coastguard is the former River-class patrol vessel HMS Orwell, now the Essequibo.’
      • ‘The man known as the Clones Colossus is a source of deep pride in this community.’
      • ‘The pride of South Indians in their food is charming and infectious.’
      • ‘The pride of the collection rightly belongs to Inter Gold, the Diamond Destination.’
      • ‘At one of the popular villas on the island, service seems the pride of the place.’
      • ‘The pride of the museum is a portrait of Queen Maria Louisa made of butterflies.’
      • ‘Amhersita Nobilis, popularly know as the pride of Burma, is the finest and a row of this has been planted at the main entrance.’
      source of satisfaction, pride and joy, darling, apple of someone's eye, treasured possession, admiration, object of admiration, joy, delight, marvel
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    4. 1.4literary The best state or condition of something; the prime.
      ‘in the pride of youth’
      • ‘But in one who often contemplates the certainty of old age, the pride of youth will either vanish entirely or will be weakened.’
      • ‘She was now three and twenty, in the pride of womanhood, fulfilling the precious duties of wife and mother, possessed of all her heart had ever coveted.’
      • ‘Our immediate predecessors saw them in their untamed state, in the vigor of their power, and the pride of their independence.’
  • 2A group of lions forming a social unit.

    • ‘Why is it that you can see a pride of lions, a murder of crows, a parliament of owls, and other such delightful collective terms, but only a boring crowd of journalists, historians, and doctors?’
    • ‘In prides, lionesses were the ones who hunted and killed.’
    • ‘A national park the size of the Netherlands, renowned for its numerous prides of black-maned lions and huge herds of plains game.’
    • ‘He had never been this way, and few men would dare to go alone, for the big cats hunted in prides of ten or more, each animal weighing as much as two grown men.’
    • ‘Its scented smoke permeated the air, lending atmosphere to the bush concert almost entirely monopolised by a pride of lions giving a magnificent roaring display.’
    • ‘Lions live in prides, family groups made up of a number of females and one or only a few male leaders.’
    • ‘We estimated numbers of lions in the study area from the annual number of females in resident prides.’
    • ‘Along the mighty Rufiji River there are eleven prides of lions.’
    • ‘The wings of parked aircraft provide a cooling patch of shade for some of the park's many predatory animals, and prides of Lions congregate there on a regular basis.’
    • ‘Lion prides are fission-fusion societies; pride members come and go and are rarely all together at once.’
    • ‘First in were wildebeest, zebras and giraffes, and then, after ten years, predators were introduced - two prides of lions, cheetahs and a pack of wild dogs.’
    • ‘I have filmed an angry elephant from a 10-metre distance and a pride of lions from about 20.’
    • ‘Perhaps they sat on the cliff above the Ardeche River, surveying the pasture beside the Pont d' Arc, watching a pride of lions take down a large mammal.’
    • ‘At this point Mr Hayhurst spotted a pride of lions and returned to his vehicle.’
    • ‘Lions live in open country, in groups known as prides, consisting of from 6 to 30 members headed by one or two mature males.’
    • ‘A lion pride can bring down a water buffalo, and then defend the carcass against hyenas; a lone lion is unlikely to be very lordly, or even well-fed.’
    • ‘He noted that the carnivores require vast territories and that some lion prides exist entirely outside park boundaries.’
    • ‘Up at dawn and with no one else in sight, whether we were tracking a pride of lions or examining a column of ants, every minute heralded a new experience for both of us.’
    • ‘We drove, we saw: a pride of lions panting in the shade by a waterhole.’
    • ‘A single buffalo distress bellow is enough to turn a docile, ruminating herd into a battalion of warriors, ready to charge and chase off an entire pride of lions.’


  • Be especially proud of a particular quality or skill.

    ‘she'd always prided herself on her ability to deal with a crisis’
    • ‘The food is not only tasty but is an art in itself specific to the Mon people, who also pride themselves on their culinary skills down to the very minute preparation details.’
    • ‘We pride ourselves on the high quality of our roofing services and offering competitive prices along with a good customer relationship.’
    • ‘I've always prided myself on not having chest infections - something of a concern to people who use wheelchairs, or at least those who have serious upper body limitations, like I have.’
    • ‘Her English teacher, Mrs. Tates, prided herself on always letting the computer randomly pick the seating assignment.’
    • ‘In one sense, radio was indeed an impersonal medium for him - he prided himself on his skills of mimicry and his way with accents.’
    • ‘True, she did not care much for her peers, but she always prided herself on her observation skills, and to have completely missed the fact that he was in one of her classes for two weeks already was a tad insulting.’
    • ‘I have prided myself on the quality of my students and consider most of them lifelong friends.’
    • ‘Leitch prides himself on his consultative leadership skills and says he strives to get the balance right between being a caring boss and a demanding one.’
    • ‘Henry prides himself on the quality of his relationships, which he believes are crucial to success.’
    • ‘The club, which has 154 members, prides itself on the high quality of both its speakers and its food.’
    • ‘They pride themselves on the quality of their work and believe that being a small business gives them an enormous advantage over their larger competitors.’
    • ‘The one thing I always prided myself on, besides my good looks, was my ability to control my anger and not say things that I would regret.’
    • ‘Trident prides itself on the quality of its workmanship.’
    • ‘He had always prided himself on never stooping to such slang.’
    • ‘The friendliness and atmosphere in their pub is something they have always prided themselves on.’
    • ‘Perhaps we pride ourselves on our qualities of competence and helpfulness, or on being the child of very special parents.’
    • ‘His secret is that he works extremely hard both physically and on his skills, and prides himself on his mental toughness.’
    • ‘Burger King said in a statement: ‘We pride ourselves on the high quality of beef used in our products.’’
    • ‘We pride ourselves on producing a quality product and will do all that we can to ensure our customers have an enjoyable experience when placing an order - or just calling with a question.’
    • ‘I've always prided myself on not needing anyone.’
    be proud of, be proud of oneself for, take pride in, take satisfaction in, congratulate oneself on, flatter oneself on, preen oneself on, pat oneself on the back for, revel in, glory in, delight in, exult in, rejoice in, triumph over
    feel self-satisfied about, vaunt, boast about, brag about, crow about, gloat over
    pique oneself in, pique oneself on
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  • one's pride and joy

    • A person or thing of which one is very proud and which is a source of great pleasure.

      ‘the car was his pride and joy’
      • ‘The luxury is a 19 ft sailing boat on Ullswater, his pride and joy.’
      • ‘The Old Forge is their pride and joy and to witness the detail around their house, it is easy to understand why they are so comfortable at this beautiful spot.’
      • ‘He had a great fondness for horse racing and bred race horses which were his pride and joy.’
      • ‘Secretary Martin Armitage said: ‘We will have our observatory telescope aimed at the Sun, as well as our pride and joy - a special solar filter attached to a premium refractor.’’
      • ‘His 12 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren were his pride and joy.’
      • ‘While he has produced numerous pieces over the years, including mirror frames, flowers and figurines, his pride and joy is a bed he has been working on for the past seven years.’
      • ‘For many owners their leisure vehicle is their pride and joy, and we can't wait to see the amazing ways that they have developed them.’
      • ‘The Brooklyn building, with its three studios, complete with sprung floors and walls of mirrors, is his pride and joy, and he's about to add another two studios.’
      • ‘Ma, the only one in the family who managed to enter university, was their pride and joy.’
      • ‘Our garden has always been our pride and joy and we spend every weekend working in it.’
  • pride goes (or comes) before a fall

    • proverb If you're too conceited or self-important, something will happen to make you look foolish.

      • ‘I guess that's just reality - pride comes before a fall.’
      • ‘But you are proud, and if pride goes before a fall, then that's where you're headed for sure.’
      • ‘Things are going well, including this week's testing, but Hislop has learned in the past that pride comes before a fall.’
      • ‘They say that pride comes before a fall and sure enough, after trumpeting my success at virus-hunting yesterday, the first words that greeted me at work this morning were, ‘That virus is back ’.’
      • ‘"I told: pride cometh before the fall, " Isabelle said smartly.’
      • ‘Whether pride goes before a fall, only the turbulent, testing year ahead will tell.’
      • ‘He told Scotland on Sunday: ‘Everyone knows that pride comes before a fall, and no Prime Minister should ever take the electorate for granted.’’
      • ‘"Pride cometh before a fall, Susanna, " we said in unison.’
      • ‘It is said that pride goes before a fall, but seldom does one realise that when the time comes the proud wilt and disappear.’
      • ‘He said: ‘They say pride goes before a fall and it's very true.’’
  • pride of place

    • The most prominent or important position among a group of things.

      ‘the certificate has pride of place on my wall’
      • ‘Among weapons, the sword occupies pride of place as the symbol of knighthood, justice, and power.’
      • ‘The more recent photographs of the projects undertaken during the millennium year had pride of place.’
      • ‘It's understood the portraits will continue to take pride of place in the mansion's seven State Rooms.’
      • ‘And come lunchtime today, when the paper hits the streets, my ad will be in pride of place, there on the front page.’
      • ‘The framed certificate will take pride of place on the wall next to another golfing accolade.’
      • ‘An ancient helmet discovered below Coppergate in York will take pride of place in a new exhibition launched next month.’
      • ‘All founding supporters will be listed in a specially designed book which will have pride of place in the Courthouse entrance.’
      • ‘Craig Knowles prefers home to school and his action man on the motorbike has pride of place among his toys.’
      • ‘A two-tier white cake decorated with roses took pride of place in the centre of a low-key buffet table.’
      • ‘In these new galleries, natural light floods a wide corridor where oils by Renoir and Cézanne are given pride of place.’
      greater importance, priority, precedence, pre-eminence, preference, superiority, first place, pride of place, weighting, supremacy, ascendancy, sovereignty, dominance, dominion, leadership
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Late Old English prȳde excessive self-esteem variant of prȳtu, prȳte, from prūd (see proud).