Definition of preppy in English:

preppy

(also preppie)

noun

US
informal
  • A student or graduate of an expensive prep school or a person resembling such a student in dress or appearance.

    • ‘These are not your typical preppies by any means.’
    • ‘They couldn't have gotten any firm to hire them as brokers, not when it was the Eighties and the market was booming and the Street was filled with ambitious preppies trying to make it in the business.’
    • ‘As the two preppies approached, he offered them the cans and got disgusted looks for payment.’
    • ‘Timothy always seemed like the kind of guy who would go for the preppies.’
    • ‘The only thing that seemed to separate the fraternities was that each one catered to a specific homogeneous group of people, whether it was preppies, jocks, or just plain losers.’
    • ‘This supports my theory that all preppies are scary.’
    • ‘She can't hide her glee when she brings down a couple of BMW-driving preppies who tried to negotiate fees with her.’
    • ‘Everybody knows that the best universities, law firms, hospitals, investment banks, and the State Department used to be run by preppies whose main virtue was fortunate birth, and are now open to one and all on the basis of merit.’
    • ‘But how many millionaire preppies who hail from Massachusetts know the difference between a shotgun and a pea-shooter?’
    • ‘That's an expensive private school for preppies, right?’
    • ‘I'm guessing that you don't know anyone yet, and the preppies won't be befriending you anytime soon, so why don't you sit at my table at lunch.’
    • ‘Most of the students treated him like a preppie, as he had heard one of them called him.’
    • ‘One of the things I wanted to impersonate was a preppy.’
    • ‘He knew Kyle's extreme dislike for preppies, but that was the first time he'd ever heard that use of the word.’
    • ‘I guess the trend was geared towards preppies, and pink was an accepted part of your wardrobe back then.’

adjective

US
informal
  • Of or typical of a student or graduate of an expensive prep school, especially with reference to their style of dress.

    ‘the preppy look’
    • ‘Even though I had enjoyed high school, in the eyes of my white, rich, preppy peers, I was as an outcast.’
    • ‘She was a very nice girl, only a bit on the ditsy / preppy side.’
    • ‘Or maybe I just didn't like her fake, dyed copper hair or preppy clothing style.’
    • ‘I then replaced my preppy, stylish clothing with dark, baggy apparel.’
    • ‘She's supposed to be the preppy little ray of sunshine.’
    • ‘By the time I got to Stanford I started wearing preppy clothes.’
    • ‘I would rather have been like a boy than a preppy little girl.’
    • ‘I still shudder at the thought of that hideously preppy name.’
    • ‘I then heard this loud, preppy voice and it sounded a lot like Tessa.’
    • ‘Maybe she broke off with that preppy boy after all.’
    • ‘I'm polite, educated, have good table manners and a stash of preppy clothes for work purposes, and once in a while, I even tell a clean joke.’
    • ‘Asha was somehow a mystery to them, an exotic girl compared to the flaunting and preppy girls, with her striking hair and sparkling green eyes.’
    • ‘There's an army of preppy kids and only a handful of skaters.’
    • ‘I didn't need these stuffy preppy clothes contaminating my car.’
    • ‘They always criticized my clothing, because they were preppy girls.’
    • ‘A car full of tough, preppy guys drove next to us and stopped.’
    • ‘It runs like an upmarket American holiday camp, with a 100% preppy house-party atmosphere.’
    • ‘When Alex came home from school, she was greeted by her preppy little sister, Megan, who was 12 years old.’
    • ‘He's funny, but not dumb, like a lot of the funny, popular, preppy guys.’
    • ‘He looked much like my friends with the preppy style.’

Origin

Early 20th century: from prep school + -y.

Pronunciation

preppy

/ˈprɛpi//ˈprepē/