Definition of prenup in English:

prenup

noun

North american
informal
  • A prenuptial agreement.

    • ‘Greg wants me to sign a prenup and I kind of need an attorney.’
    • ‘When my future husband mooted the idea of a prenup, I burst into tears.’
    • ‘She isn't married, but she will be as soon as that rascally fiancé of hers gets it in his head to sign her prenup.’
    • ‘My attorney called to remind me again to do something about renewing my prenup.’
    • ‘Confidentiality agreements are the prenups of the business world: One walks in and love flies out the door.’
    • ‘The husband also confirms what she claimed - that the couple signed a prenup on December 14, 1994.’
    • ‘I've had occasional cases where people working through the prenup decided not to marry - the prenup in those cases didn't prevent marriage, it prevented divorce.’
    • ‘So let this be a lesson to all: always sign a prenup.’
    • ‘Under California law, since the couple did not sign a prenup, earnings during the marriage are divided 50 / 50.’
    • ‘He told me that, in his experience, most of the time when one party feels unfairly treated in a prenup, the marriage ends in divorce.’
    • ‘You might suggest, if she insists on getting married, that the house be in her name and that she have a prenup.’
    • ‘Ideally, a prenup must be signed before a marriage occurs - hence, the name.’
    • ‘Because they signed a prenup without attorneys, it was thrown out in court.’
    • ‘I even mentioned I have no problem with a prenup if that would make him feel better.’
    • ‘He says that as women are closing the wealth gap, they're becoming more interested in prenups.’

Origin

1990s: abbreviation.

Pronunciation:

prenup

/ˈprēˌnəp/