Definition of premonition in English:

premonition

Pronunciation /ˌprēməˈniSH(ə)n//ˌpreməˈniSH(ə)n/

noun

  • A strong feeling that something is about to happen, especially something unpleasant.

    ‘he had a premonition of imminent disaster’
    • ‘I am quite sure that you should not worry too much about your premonitions.’
    • ‘The prince searches for her through the white night of St. Petersburg, his mind full of confusion, premonitions and anxiety, as on the eve of an attack.’
    • ‘There is a mystery lurking in Julie's past, a dead body in the pool house, a wizened dwarf all dressed in black: omens, premonitions, suspicions that things are not what they seem.’
    • ‘My cousin's wife spent last night talking about horrible premonitions and it didn't take much to convince my cousin that they would be better off at home.’
    • ‘I had strong premonitions of doom, the unmistakable feeling I was walking into a trap.’
    • ‘She glanced at Bev and realized her friend was worried about the premonition.’
    • ‘A chill, in accordance with all the cliches about premonitions and fears, went up my spine. I got up on the counter.’
    • ‘Marriage is a very real commitment and is devoid of the romantic notions and premonitions we have about it, and that we carry before engagement.’
    • ‘It can indicate premonitions or other intuitions about what is to come.’
    • ‘Perhaps my visions are premonitions… though I doubt it greatly.’
    apprehension, apprehensiveness, anxiety, perturbation, trepidation, disquiet, disquietude, unease, uneasiness, misgiving, suspicion, worry, fear, fearfulness, dread, alarm
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Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense warning): from French prémonition, from late Latin praemonitio(n-), from Latin praemonere, from prae before + monere warn.

Pronunciation

premonition

/ˌprēməˈniSH(ə)n//ˌpreməˈniSH(ə)n/