Definition of predictability in US English:

predictability

noun

  • 1The ability to be predicted.

    ‘we were discussing the predictability of career outcomes’
    ‘the uncovering of motives allows for a certain degree of predictability’
    • ‘You understand a mature business because it has a level of predictability.’
    • ‘Tempos shift from polar opposites without predictability.’
    • ‘Styles change with seasonal predictability.’
    • ‘It could be argued that control systems do at least bring clarity and predictability.’
    • ‘With innovation comes reduced predictability and increased risk.’
    • ‘Predictability and planning become ever more important as farming becomes a more sophisticated science.’
    • ‘Great defensive teams understand the predictability of their opponents' offensive patterns.’
    • ‘Sales forecasts should be based on accuracy and predictability.’
    • ‘Performers moving from venue to venue apparently prefer the predictability of a symmetrical auditorium.’
    • ‘The predictability of the monthly fee is another big plus.’
    1. 1.1derogatory The fact of always behaving or occurring in the way expected.
      ‘the boring predictability of their routine’
      • ‘The first problem lies with the predictability of the plot.’
      • ‘It undermined the cozy predictability of their routines.’
      • ‘Their lives are hemmed in by the predictability of poverty.’
      • ‘Much of the problem lies in the predictability of virtually every scenario.’
      • ‘The film's fatal flaw is its predictability.’

Pronunciation

predictability

/prəˌdɪktəˈbɪlədi//prəˌdiktəˈbilədē/