Definition of precognition in English:

precognition

noun

  • 1Foreknowledge of an event, especially foreknowledge of a paranormal kind.

    • ‘There has been a long-standing controversy in parapsychology as to whether true precognition is possible.’
    • ‘Overall, the results appear to indicate that true precognition may not be possible.’
    • ‘So, any apparent success in the experiments must be attributed to precognition, not to telepathy.’
    • ‘In fact non-psychics were also tested, but other ESP categories (e.g., precognition, retrocognition, telepathy) were never assessed.’
    • ‘The initial postal experiment suggested that true precognition may not be possible.’
    • ‘Lisa is the ‘level-headed’ girl blessed with inexplicable powers of precognition but is utterly useless in a pinch.’
    • ‘Similarly, if someone fails a driver's test, it's ‘precognition’ that the person will likely be a bad driver, but it's again a pretty sensible precognition.’
    • ‘Much of this work was conducted with Mihalasky, and their further collaboration brought clear, astonishing evidence of precognition.’
    • ‘The other document described ‘bioinformation’ such as telepathy, precognition and clairvoyance and bioenergetics like psychokinesis and telekinesis.’
    • ‘Because the key game was selected before any games were played, subjects had to use precognition to foresee which game was going to get the highest score, so as to know which number to try for.’
    • ‘Moreover, significant correlations were found only in the two experiments that had results suggestive of true precognition.’
    • ‘If the experiment were directly replicated with the same results, this may indicate that true precognition is possible, at least under certain conditions.’
    • ‘The second is the use of the eyes not just to see in the normal sense, but to gain insight, discernment, perception and precognition.’
    • ‘Now some might call that telepathy, others clairvoyance or precognition, or others dub it a trick or coincidence.’
    • ‘A considerable portion of the existing evidence for psi phenomena such as ESP, precognition, and psychokinesis is based on the relatively young science of statistical meta-analysis.’
    • ‘He or she needs to be gifted with a kind of compositional precognition, understanding inherently what shots, setups, and sequences will produce fear and foreboding.’
    • ‘However, the producers also decided to look at the claims of believers that animals have psychic powers - such as telepathy and precognition.’
  • 2Scottish Law
    The preliminary examination of witnesses, especially to decide whether there are grounds for a trial.

Origin

Late Middle English: from late Latin praecognitio(n-), based on Latin cognoscere ‘know’.

Pronunciation

precognition

/ˌprēˌkäɡˈniSH(ə)n//ˌpriˌkɑɡˈnɪʃ(ə)n/