Definition of precipice in English:

precipice

noun

  • A very steep rock face or cliff, especially a tall one.

    ‘we swerved toward the edge of the precipice’
    figurative ‘the country was teetering on the precipice of political anarchy’
    • ‘Fancy yourself in a car which you do not know how to steer and cannot stop, with an inexhaustible supply of petrol in the tank, rushing along at fifty miles an hour on an island strewn with rocks and bounded by cliff precipices!’
    • ‘She followed the sound of her voice until she suddenly found herself on the edge of a steep precipice.’
    • ‘If the two don't speak to each other, the world edges closer to the precipice of total war.’
    • ‘There are also cliffs and precipices to be negotiated.’
    • ‘We seem to teeter on the edge of the precipice, but get pulled back by the seat of our pants.’
    • ‘Get lost in the mist on a peak such as Tryfan and you can easily stray over the edge of a precipice.’
    • ‘But, after teetering at the edge of the precipice, he woke up one morning feeling miraculously restored.’
    • ‘I am standing on the edge of a precipice and ready to go over the edge - but there is nothing to catch my fall.’
    • ‘We were all financially scrambling on the edge of a precipice.’
    • ‘We stand upon the edge of a precipice, the fall from which we will not return.’
    • ‘That duty is even more urgent when the council is edging towards a financial precipice.’
    • ‘The metaphors vary but the message is the same: the debt bubble is about to burst, we are on the edge of a debt precipice, we are addicted to debt.’
    • ‘I had found sublimity and wonder in the dread heights and precipices, in the roaring torrents, and the wastes of ice and snow; but as yet, they had taught me nothing else.’
    • ‘We, descendants of human suffering, are living in a fine mansion at the edge of a precipice.’
    • ‘A series of tragedies forced them to fight the three by-elections that brought them to the political precipice.’
    • ‘We stand on the edge of a precipice, staring into the void.’
    • ‘The route, almost continuous Z-bends on the edge of precipices, is one few drivers are willing to risk.’
    • ‘It is too late to pull the rein when the horse is on the edge of the precipice.’
    • ‘She once told me that, as a creative, you want to walk up to the edge of the precipice and look over, but make sure you don't fall off.’
    • ‘Living on the edge of precipices, it will raise skeletons high into the sky, dash them onto the rocks, and then extract the marrow with its curved beak.’
    cliff face, steep cliff, rock face, sheer drop, cliff, crag, bluff, height, escarpment, scarp, escarp, scar
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (denoting a headlong fall): from French précipice or Latin praecipitium ‘abrupt descent’, from praeceps, praecip(it)- ‘steep, headlong’.

Pronunciation

precipice

/ˈpresəpəs//ˈprɛsəpəs/