Definition of prairie in English:

prairie

noun

  • 1A large open area of grassland, especially in the Mississippi River valley.

    • ‘The redevelopment will restore prairie and riparian corridors within new city parks and open space.’
    • ‘The Canadian prairie is one of the most productive wheat fields in the world.’
    • ‘Prairie pothole marshes were present in two small prairie potholes that often dry completely in the summer.’
    • ‘They're not unlike the rolling prairies he sings of.’
    • ‘Limestone prairie habitat in Pennsylvania is seriously threatened.’
    • ‘The campus itself boasts 6800 acres of open water, fields, deciduous forests, restored prairie, and wetlands.’
    • ‘Thermal conditions in the previous year were strongly associated with grasshopper abundance in this oldfield prairie.’
    • ‘My friend and I have just come upon a picturesque farmhouse on a rolling prairie.’
    • ‘Sedge meadow was distinguished from wet prairie by having more than half its dominants as sedge family species.’
    • ‘As a young woman she worked job to job, to help her parents make their prairie farm a home.’
    • ‘Over 90 percent of our native prairies has been plowed under or grazed away.’
    • ‘In the prairie pothole region of the United States, blackbirds damage ripening sunflower crops.’
    • ‘Both originated on our vast wind-swept prairies for good reason.’
    • ‘In 1708, the area around their towns consisted of open oak woodlands, savannas, and prairies.’
    • ‘Numbers have been greatly reduced in the Canadian prairies for this very reason.’
    • ‘With these they are able to dramatise plains, prairies, steppes and meadows.’
    • ‘In that place we had an open prairie not far from our house.’
    • ‘Other populations of Sioux are to be found in the prairie provinces of Canada.’
    • ‘In fact, he spends much of his free time walking through the wet prairies near his home.’
    • ‘Hazy purple horizons, the norm on these rolling prairies, stretched away in all directions.’
  • 2[often as modifier] A steam locomotive of 2-6-2 wheel arrangement.

Origin

Late 18th century: from French, from Old French praerie, from Latin pratum meadow.

Pronunciation:

prairie

/ˈprerē/