Definition of praemunientes in English:

praemunientes

noun

Law
historical
  • The clause of a writ of summons to Parliament, first issued in 1295, in which the bishops and abbots called to parliament are ordered to summon representatives of the minor clergy to attend with them. Usually more fully "praemunientes clause".

Origin

Late 17th century; earliest use found in Edward Stillingfleet (1635–1699), bishop of Worcester and theologian. From classical Latin praemūnientēs, plural present participle of praemūnīre, used in post-classical Latin for praemonēre to warn, admonish; occurring in a clause of the writ of Edw. I, 1295, summoning the spiritual estate to Parliament; hence applied attributively to this clause and to the writ.

Pronunciation

praemunientes

/ˌpriːmjuːnɪˈɛntiːz/