Definition of potter's field in US English:

potter's field

noun

historical
  • A burial place for paupers and strangers.

    • ‘This caring is best symbolized by their efforts to save each other from the potter's field.’
    • ‘In its earliest incarnation, from the 1790s through 1825, Washington Square was a potter's field and the site of public executions and corporal punishments.’
    • ‘If we can see through them with a clear eye, we will see what he saw, which is that the field of human history and human political effort is a potter's field, a field of blood.’
    • ‘A potter's field was bought and it was made into a foreigners' cemetery, and it was appropriately called ‘Field of Blood’ from then on.’
    • ‘The interesting part of this, though, is that Washington Square Park in New York was once a potter's field, too.’
    • ‘And they took counsel, and bought with them the potter's field, to bury strangers in.’

Origin

The name of an area of land near Jerusalem bought for this purpose with the money given to Judas Iscariot for betraying Jesus (Matt. 27:7).

Pronunciation

potter's field

/ˈpädərz ˌfēld/