Main definitions of potter in English

: potter1potter2

potter1

verb

British
  • another term for putter
    • ‘For people with dementia wandering may well be pottering with a purpose a desire to use up excess energy, to check out an unusual aspect of the local environment, or simply to seek fresh air.’
    • ‘Guiseppe has told me that he caught you poking sadly about at what remains of the old vegetable garden, so if you wish you may potter about in it to your heart's content.’
    • ‘Days were filled with quietude, evenings spent pottering around in the garden and topped off with a stroll to the neighbour's for dinner and some piano playing.’
    • ‘Normally I potter about my small world, enjoying the fruits of my labours, happy as the days are long.’
    • ‘The latter is a whizz-fast futuristic racer, the former a calm, abstract, flight-game where you potter about flying jetpacks, autogyros, and parachutes.’
    • ‘The little blue Ford and I have spent hours puttering along, following our fancy, taking turns at random, tracing a crazy quilt pattern across this landscape and others.’
    • ‘I'll need to do a full-scale shop on Monday but, for the weekend, I'm happy to stay home, pottering from one pleasant task to another.’
    • ‘At only 10m to the seabed and rising to within a metre or two of the surface, it provides an ideal depth to potter about following a first dive on one of the deeper Channel wrecks.’
    • ‘While I'm puttering around playing with words, other people are investing and accumulating and feathering their nests and compounding their interest.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: (in the sense ‘poke repeatedly’): frequentative of dialect pote ‘to push, kick, or poke’ of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

potter

/ˈpɑdər//ˈpädər/

Main definitions of potter in English

: potter1potter2

potter2

noun

  • A person who makes pottery.

    • ‘Following Meissen and Sèvres products, British potters began to use china clay or kaolin, when in 1768 William Cookworthy, a Plymouth chemist, proved the potential of the kaolin reserves of Cornwall.’
    • ‘Such workers - for the most part blacksmiths, weavers, and potters - traditionally constituted a distinct class, almost a separate caste.’
    • ‘In other words, potters made the porcelain netsuke, and lacquerers produced the lacquer netsuke.’
    • ‘Different streets were allotted for different professions such as potters, weavers, dyers, jewelers, and bakers.’
    • ‘Soon, he was attracted to clay and turned to designer pottery, producing earthenware with the assistance of local potters from a studio in Kottayam district.’
    • ‘Philostratus indeed alludes to this: the new fire, he says, is distributed especially ‘to the craftsmen who have to do with fire’, i.e. to potters and blacksmiths.’
    • ‘It is this focus that makes him not just a studio potter, but a ceramicist of note.’
    • ‘By mid-century there were five potteries there, and a number of potters had migrated west to establish their own kilns.’
    • ‘Those who make their living as blacksmiths, weavers, potters, or musicians are looked upon with some disfavor and suspicion.’
    • ‘This vase illustrates the aesthetic lying behind the surviving decorated pottery, as potters evoked the effect of gold on silver in making their wares red and black.’
    • ‘This tendency was preserved during the Second Bulgarian Kingdom, when the town was the center of commerce, crafts, culture, goldsmiths, potters, tanners, and skilled weavers.’
    • ‘The project, now in its third year, uses a core of eight ceramic artists who are joined by additional potters, some established and others just emerging.’
    • ‘Architects, painters, potters and other craftsman and artists often accompanied the monks and it was these people who constructed the great temples of Japan.’
    • ‘In rural areas Hindus perform much of the traditional craft production of items for everyday life; caste groups include weavers, potters, iron and gold smiths, and carpenters.’
    • ‘He is also helping Kenyan potters export their wares to the US.’
    • ‘There are also a small number of merchants in Oromo society, as well as weavers, goldsmiths, potters, and woodworkers.’
    • ‘It has been my experience, in the art-show world, at least, that the word ‘clay,’ when used to describe this polymer material, has offended and angered many potters and ceramicists.’
    • ‘Armed with skills such as metalworking and pottery making, the newly emancipated Texans flourished as weavers, potters, blacksmiths, masons and carpenters.’
    • ‘These laborers included samurai, cooks, sake brewers, potters, printers, tailors, wood workers, and one hairdresser.’
    • ‘Weavers, potters, storytellers, jewellery-makers, woodworkers and ironsmiths are still part of the village community.’

Origin

Late Old English pottere (see pot, -er).

Pronunciation

potter

/ˈpädər//ˈpɑdər/