Definition of Potawatomi in US English:

Potawatomi

nounPlural Potawatomis

  • 1A member of a North American people living originally around Lake Michigan.

    • ‘Wigwam appears as it might have two hundred years ago when the Potawatomi fished its seemingly placid waters.’
    • ‘These Indians, such as the Shawnees, Ottawas, and the Potawatomis, were shocked and disappointed when the French capitulated and ceded Canada in 1760.’
    • ‘The French generally enjoyed good relations with nations such as the Ojibwa and the Potawatomi so long as trade goods were readily available and reasonably priced.’
    • ‘Because of this early association, the Potawatomi, the Ottawa, and the Ojibwa are known collectively as the Three Fires.’
    • ‘Interestingly, according to Vogel, Senega snakeroot was ‘the chief remedy for heart trouble among the Potawatomis and Meskwakis‘.’
  • 2The Algonquian language of the Potawatomi.

adjective

  • Relating to the Potawatomi or their language.

    • ‘Of these, certain sites clearly reflect multiple components widely separated in time, as at Carroll College, where effigy mounds clearly predate the contiguous nineteenth-century Potawatomi corn hills by several hundred years.’
    • ‘Dream visions influenced the decisions of Potawatomi councils and often guided the future of the people.’
    • ‘This census reveals the shifting locations of between six and 10 Potawatomi villages and the number of occupants who resided in them.’
    • ‘The latter site is reputed to be a location cultivated by a small Potawatomi group during the mid - to late 180Os, many years after the period of their formal removal from southeastern Wisconsin.’
    • ‘The United States also managed to gain three million acres of Delaware and Potawatomi land in Indiana through the Treaty of Fort Wayne.’
    • ‘The Potawatomi Indians are reported to have used both flowers and flower buds of the common milkweed to flavor and thicken their meat soups.’

Origin

The name in Ojibwa.

Pronunciation

Potawatomi

/ˌpädəˈwädəmē/