Main definitions of pot in English

: pot1pot2pot3pot4

pot1

noun

  • 1A container, typically rounded or cylindrical and of ceramic ware or metal, used for storage or cooking.

    ‘clay pots for keeping water cool in summer’
    ‘a cooking pot’
    • ‘Kitchen utensils include pots, bowls, cooking ladles, and spoons made of coconut shells.’
    • ‘Some make it into their cooking pots, while others are sold for a tidy profit ranging from B20,000 and up.’
    • ‘Have you always thought that cooking with aluminum pots and pans can cause Alzheimer's disease?’
    • ‘In Bahia, the African tradition of cooking in ceramic pots is followed.’
    • ‘They have only necessities, such as two or three cooking pots, a few plates, wooden spoons, and very few articles of clothing.’
    • ‘Transfer to a cooking pot with five litres of cold water.’
    • ‘The sequences for lamps, fine wares, amphoras, cooking pots, and plain wares can be clearly established at Corinth.’
    • ‘It had fired jugs, pans, cooking pots and roofing tiles in the 14th century, and similar wares have been found on excavations locally and in adjacent counties.’
    • ‘Fabric softener sheets are claimed to clean baked on foods from cooking pots and pans.’
    • ‘She placed a cooking pot in the sink, filling it with warm water before setting it on the burning, turning the knob to high.’
    • ‘Without running water, women wash their cooking pots in the street.’
    • ‘Stirring it around for a while, she then dished it up into a big bowl, put water into both her cooking pots, and took her dinner out onto the roof, where she ate among the stars.’
    • ‘In ordinary kitchens of all periods, cooking pots were made of unglazed Nile clay, sometimes with a burnished slip coating.’
    • ‘She could understand why they would need cooking pots and pans, rope, blankets, even the sword he had taken with him.’
    • ‘When there was enough room for both of them to stand outside, Maggie fired up the two-burner stove and started melting snow in both cooking pots.’
    • ‘He stood up decisively, and took on of their cooking pots, and collected some rain water.’
    • ‘The remaining challenge was to scale up the process from samples the size of postage stamps to cylinders as big as cooking pots.’
    • ‘Pliny the Younger gives us the romantic tale that Phoenician merchants first noticed that glass was formed under their cooking pots on the beach.’
    • ‘These paste attributes suggest the multipurpose nature of these vessel forms, used as cooking pots and containers.’
    • ‘Questions, questions all around bubbling in her head like hot water in a cooking pot.’
    cooking utensil, container, receptacle, vessel
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1usually with modifier Any of various containers made for a particular purpose.
      as modifier ‘a coffee pot’
    2. 1.2 A container for holding drink, especially beer.
      • ‘Returning quickly and wiping his mouth, he handed Brownlegg a canned drink and a plastic pot, which rattled.’
      • ‘The leader then mixed a pot of Zulu beer, an offering for the ancestors, then asked the ancestors to bless the country's leaders, and the market.’
      • ‘She turns on her heel and quickly returns with our drinks in small, metallic pots and chipped mugs.’
      • ‘A waitress will come to your side with a set of small tea cups and pots, each with a different function.’
      • ‘Here you'll sit at long communal tables while waitresses in Bavarian costume serve foaming pots of beer.’
      • ‘I poured the steaming hot black coffee from the pot into my thermal cup.’
      • ‘All of the water you put in the coffee maker eventually comes out of the maker and into a pot or a cup, albeit as coffee.’
      • ‘Secondly, the beer came in plastic pots, so I was gone if I got into a fight with the bouncers.’
      • ‘As exotic and exciting as the double handshake was the sorghum beer handed around in mud pots.’
      • ‘In fact I tried several times after first filling the pot with beer.’
      • ‘Ingcazi by Nala Ntombi, for instance, is a series of beer pots traditionally used by young women to acknowledge the advances of young men.’
      • ‘Some of us probably get through several pots of the drink.’
      • ‘I refilled our mugs and returned the pot to the burner.’
      • ‘Together we drank five cups and the pot was still not dry.’
      • ‘The fight abruptly ended in order to save the beer pot from being broken.’
      • ‘After dexterous moves with the coffee machine, pots and cups, the Espresso is ready for tasting and then on to the other brews.’
      • ‘A pot of sorghum beer is placed in the center of the room with numerous reed straws, and participants come forward to partake.’
    3. 1.3 The contents of any pot.
      ‘a pot of coffee’
      • ‘Having shared a pot of tea for two we were ready to wend our way back to York after paying £10.50 for our snack.’
      • ‘You not only get a pot of tea, or coffee, but fresh (un-sugared) whipped cream, and a sweet.’
      • ‘Fortified by a pot of tea and a toasted teacake at a transport cafe we again found ourselves on the A75.’
      • ‘Yesterday staff, local craftspeople and builders who worked on the new branch toasted its success with a glass of champagne rather than a pot of tea.’
      • ‘I could never draw with a steel quill worth a damn, so I kept a pot of ink and a couple of nibs above my mouse.’
      • ‘So sit back quietly in that agreeably familiar comfy chair, treat yourself to a pot of weakish tea, and let me put the case for the rise of the dull man.’
      • ‘The competition for the night is for a pot of the best homemade blackcurrant jam.’
      • ‘A pot of tea for Ann and sparkling mineral water for me completed our snack at £8.15.’
      • ‘I used to think that absolutely nothing could provide contentment equal to a pot of coffee and a four-pound Sunday newspaper.’
      • ‘Ann couldn't be persuaded to have more than a toasted teacake and a pot of tea which was a ‘special’ at £1.50.’
      • ‘Ann had a pot of tea which was offered with either fresh milk or a sachet.’
      • ‘His house is equipped with various kinds of roasted coffee beans, a coffee grinder, and a coffee machine by which a pot of coffee can be brewed.’
      • ‘In fact, I won't be seeing it at all, because I have a pot of white emulsion and a wall that needs to be watched as the paint dries.’
      • ‘After practically giving up coffee for a couple of months, I had a pot of dark roast Friday.’
      • ‘Especially if you accompany it with a pot of Chinese tea - great for the digestion and known to lower cholesterol levels - rather than the usual pint of lager.’
      • ‘Yesterday she was braving a chilly wind for a pot of tea outside Sid's Cafe in the town centre, and wondering why she had left behind the 90 degree heat of Arlington.’
      • ‘Along with the higher cost of produce, I find the charges in the cafés extortionate, with a pot of tea for two costing up to £2.50.’
      • ‘There always seems to be a pot of the café's delicious trademark hibiscus, ginger and cinnamon tea steeping on the counter.’
      • ‘In addition for £1.65 I had a Danish pastry with a pot of tea.’
      • ‘But the fact that a show was intended to be watched while sipping a pot of tea seems no longer to debar it from the status of entertainment to be enjoyed while chomping choc ices.’
  • 2the potThe total sum of the bets made on a round in poker and other card games.

    ‘Jim raked in the pot’
    • ‘At the end of a hand, the dealer retains anything that is left in the pot, and the deal passes to the next player.’
    • ‘The winner of the pot in the poker stage begins the play by leading a card face up in front of them.’
    • ‘On the hand in question I was on the button with five players already in the pot.’
    • ‘In a showdown, the winner will take the pot consisting of the small antes and the bets.’
    • ‘The highest bidder places the number of counters bid into the pot.’
    • ‘When you peek at your two hole cards, if they're not both pretty big, it's very unlikely you belong in the pot.’
    • ‘Operators would rather rake the pot than charge per hand, because they can take out more money.’
    • ‘You merely need to extract more value from the pot than you put into it.’
    • ‘And if you happen to catch an ace or a king, that's likely to win the pot too.’
    • ‘Then, besides winning the pot when I improved, I'd also win a few of the times that I missed!’
    • ‘Players pay the final difference between their total and the winner's total to the pot before the winner collects the final pot.’
    • ‘If there is a tie for either high or low, the players involved in the tie split that half of the pot.’
    • ‘Second, be as certain as you can that your hand is best and that the pot odds are right.’
    • ‘According to the confused floor man announcing the event, Julian had made a flush and had won the pot.’
    • ‘Players having strong hands, who are waiting to raise, don't want you to know this until you're in the pot.’
    • ‘If several people are staying, the pot will return better odds and may be worth a chase.’
    • ‘I decided to just call so as to keep as many as possible in the pot.’
    • ‘Everyone puts a nickel into the pot and you deal out 5 cards to each player.’
    • ‘If the hand was played to the end, the pot stays in place, and there is no new ante; the players who folded in the previous hand are dealt in again if they wish.’
    • ‘If either of these players is nearly all in, you'll need a fairly decent hand to raise the pot.’
    bank, kitty, pool, purse, stakes, ante, jackpot
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 All the money contributed by a group of people for a particular purpose.
      ‘in insurance, everybody puts money into the pot used to pay claims’
      • ‘The reports says that savings can be made leaving members with a pot of £141,000 to select worthy projects.’
      • ‘Together they will create a pot of £450,000 a year and the first signs of how that money will spent will be seen on September 23.’
      • ‘First, it means less money in the pot, so that fewer tutors can be hired and average tutorial sizes continue to get larger and larger.’
      • ‘For this the hostesses get very well paid and so it is a lucrative line of business, especially for a foreign hostess who can earn a pot of cash in three months and then disappear on holiday for the rest of the year.’
      • ‘For income of only £14,000 per annum at retirement a pot of about £255,000 needs to be built up.’
      • ‘A councillor frustrated at not being able to give a pot of cash away to people in Bolton is overjoyed after 14 groups applied for the money.’
      • ‘Maldon District Council has a pot of more than £400,000 to spend on new facilities for children and young people of all ages during the next 18 months.’
      • ‘The reality is that the Government is not putting enough money into the pot.’
      • ‘There just won't be enough money in the pot to pay for it.’
      • ‘It was feared these endowments might not mature with enough money in the pot to pay off the mortgages, leaving people with a substantial shortfall.’
      • ‘A pot of £10,000 would give an income of around £620 a year to a man aged 60.’
      • ‘The councillor said she understood there needed to be money in the pot for works but the fees charged in rural areas were too high for people.’
      • ‘If it doesn't look like there'll be enough money in the pot to finance pension commitments, it's the employer who has to top it up.’
      • ‘The idea has been mooted before but this time there's actually money flowing into the pot.’
      • ‘The public will eventually like what they're told to, it all depends on how much marketing money is in the pot.’
      • ‘We just added another $37 billion of your taxpayer money to the pot of those incentives.’
      • ‘What private accounts can do, but the pay-as-you-go system can't, is grow the pot of money available for people to retire on.’
      • ‘Then people pay a bit more when they buy certain things which is a fair tax and that money goes into the pot.’
      • ‘These included pulling the plug on winter gritting to ensure there was enough money left in the pot to pay for snow clearance.’
      • ‘Mr Greenwood said putting the whole strategy into action would cost £40,000 and it was hoped Cumbria County Council would put some money into the pot.’
  • 3informal A potbelly.

    • ‘As I explained to Shawn, I feel a great amount of back fat, and the lower-slung jeans that I wear make the pot that is my belly especially obvious to me.’
    • ‘It's also a very good pattern for anyone who has a bit of a pot, because the crossgrain hangs down straight, and totally diminishes a pot.’
    paunch, belly, beer belly, gut, fat stomach, protruding stomach
    View synonyms
  • 4the potUS informal A toilet.

    • ‘The last thing I want to hear is somebody else's idea of good music while I am sitting on the pot.’
    • ‘Anyway, I take off his PJs and diaper and put him on the pot.’
    • ‘Nothing like walking in on someone sitting on the pot.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Plant in a flowerpot.

    ‘pot individual cuttings as soon as you see new young leaves’
    • ‘After germination plants were potted and arranged in stands as described above.’
    • ‘To enjoy potted bulbs longest, select young plants with tight buds and just a little color showing - not those already in full bloom.’
    • ‘Similarly, other potted flowering plants, including anthuriums and bromeliads, are becoming important.’
    • ‘The lily can be set at the bottom of the container, but set the other potted plants on top of stacked bricks so that their crowns are two to four inches below the water's surface.’
    • ‘For longest enjoyment, buy potted bulbs when the buds are formed but even fully emerged.’
    • ‘Buy potted bulbs when the stems are short and the buds are formed but not open.’
    • ‘However, the height of the stand and the fact that it is based on a hexagon also mean that the display will be cone-like in form - so if you were to arrange 50 potted plants on it, you would see a towering hill of blooms.’
    • ‘The only thing that all potted plants need is regular watering, plus fertiliser to keep them going longer.’
    • ‘Try recycling old articles that would otherwise be junk, when you next want to pot a plant.’
    • ‘When potting African violets, take care to set the plant so that the crown is just above the surface and the soil is firmly pressed around it.’
    • ‘If you find you need additional plants besides the four listed here, consider adding a bright colored potted pansy or a colorful primrose.’
    • ‘In hot weather, potted plants may need water twice daily.’
    • ‘The grass leaves and roots gradually rot down to produce a fine, crumbly loam that can be used for potting all sorts of plants from tomatoes to tulips.’
    • ‘Fill the base with gravel, place the potted plants on top of the gravel and cover the surface with sphagnum moss or osmunda fibers.’
    • ‘Schizanthus are very slow to germinate, so it's best to purchase plants that are already potted from your garden center.’
    • ‘Each cage was filled with 20 potted plants of one of four genotypes of soybeans.’
    • ‘When potting or planting, care must be taken to avoid damaging them.’
    • ‘So potted roses that you bring home from the garden center in, say, mid-April, will be much more advanced than the bareroot bushes you planted at about the same time.’
    • ‘For the examinations, the plants were potted and transferred to the laboratory.’
    • ‘If winter lows will drop down into the mid-20s or lower, bring potted fuchsias indoors, and put them in a cool place until spring.’
  • 2Preserve (food, especially meat or fish) in a sealed pot or jar.

    ‘venison can be potted in the same way as tongue’
    • ‘The restaurant, now in its 25th year, uses a 100-year-old secret recipe for potting the shrimps, handed down from local fishermen.’
    • ‘The wife admitted that she and her husband had frequently had potted meat from the shop without ill effects.’
    • ‘The offal would be passed round for instant consumption, the rest potted, salted or dried.’
    • ‘Dig out the old Cookbook or whatever recipe you use and get it potted up ready for those scrummy little tartlets.’
    • ‘You can also provide food for thought with herbs, potted strawberries and tomatoes.’
    • ‘So we melted butter and a little garlic and parsley and potted them.’
    • ‘At this time of year, all the best gourmet restaurants have elderberry ice-cream on the menu and cooks are busy potting up rose hip chutney, quince jelly and bottling sloe gin liqueur.’
    • ‘Fishing for mussels and shrimps was a hobby but potting the fruits of your labours and selling them on was a good way to save up for a new future.’
    • ‘A comedian entertained the camera crews, the national press core were fed pies and potted Morecambe Bay shrimps and a certain statue was kitted out with a woolly hat and scarf.’
    • ‘My own grandmother was indeed forever pickling and potting.’
    • ‘One popular canned item was potted meat, which customers mixed with eggs to make inexpensive sandwiches.’
  • 3Billiards Snooker

    another term for pocket
    • ‘I couldn't pot a long ball and I had no run all day.’
    • ‘Dave swiftly potted 4 balls then Roy potted 2 and then forced Dave to foul.’
    • ‘Michael failed to pot an easy pink, which will haunt him for a long time.’
    • ‘We only played a couple more frames in that session and I won them both as John could hardly hold his cue never mind pot any balls.’
    • ‘But then he potted an audacious red to begin a run of 29.’
    • ‘The new pool rule he introduced involved only using one hand to pot the black.’
    • ‘Frame six of a match King eventually won was literally a comedy of errors, neither player able to pot black and kill the frame.’
    • ‘He is unfortunate to snooker himself in the pack after potting a long red.’
    • ‘He should have potted the pink and I think his head dropped after that.’
    • ‘He potted 13 reds and 12 blacks before losing position on the colour.’
  • 4informal Hit or kill (someone or something) by shooting.

    ‘he was shot in the eye as neighbors potted clay pigeons’
    • ‘In a productive grouse year, around 350,000 of the birds are potted by shooting parties in the UK, mostly in Scotland, during the August to November season.’

Phrases

  • for the pot

    • For food or cooking.

      ‘hens provided eggs as well as meat for the pot’
      • ‘The Government has ruled that it is now illegal to shoot a crow, rook or pigeon for the pot without scaring it first.’
      • ‘But the old-school, romantic poacher who steals one for the pot with his well-worn net slung out over the darkened river; there's a certain attraction in him, isn't there?’
      • ‘It was a simple stone tower with an internal wooden structure to enable staff to climb up and collect eggs and birds for the pot.’
      • ‘Farmers have been known to make the most of this - and take the odd one home for the pot.’
      • ‘The few people who do go shooting on this land only get what is needed for the pot.’
      • ‘These were pretty much the only live animals I saw in Hong Kong that weren't destined for the pot.’
      • ‘We're not talking about peasants supplementing their diet by hunting game for the pot.’
      • ‘It appears that a good part of the shipment was intended for the pot in North Italian gourmet restaurants, the rest for illegal stuffing - something strictly forbidden in the EU by water-tight legislation.’
      • ‘Nature is neither cruel, nor moralistic, and if you live close to it, the concept of good and evil merges into one, so that the death of an intruder is either something for the pot, or the defence of territory.’
      • ‘We had chooks and ducks, and being simple folk we treated some of them as pets, at least in their formative days until they were ready for the pot.’
  • go to pot

    • informal Deteriorate through neglect.

      ‘the foundry was allowed to go to pot in the seventies’
      • ‘He added: ‘Since the government brought in this zero tolerance on crime, the country has gone to pot.’’
      • ‘New York and Chicago got many great art deco masterpieces, and then architecture went to pot for 30 years.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, back in the real world, my O-Level studies went to pot, closely followed by the A-Levels.’
      • ‘Naturally, I've been backing up copies on my home computer, but then I downloaded the corrupted files and wrote them over the working versions, so it's all gone to pot.’
      • ‘My late night writing session went to pot, as it were.’
      • ‘At least one Canadian believes that politics haven't gone to pot - and he's trying to do something about it.’
      • ‘If your fuel mileage has gone to pot, if your car or truck is sluggish and appears to have lost its zip, if it is hard to start, or you have failed an emission inspection, you almost certainly need a tune-up.’
      • ‘And her complexion has gone to pot and she isn't as pretty any more.’
      • ‘She added: ‘I was proud of working here but now look at it, it's gone to pot.’’
      • ‘I was in such tizzy when I wrote it that spelling and grammar went to pot.’
      deteriorate, decline, degenerate, go to ruin, go to rack and ruin, go downhill, go to seed, decay, fall into disrepair, become dilapidated, run down, rot, slide
      View synonyms
  • the pot calling the kettle black

    • Used to convey that the criticisms a person is aiming at someone else could equally well apply to themselves.

      • ‘Forgive me for mentioning it, but isn't it a case of the pot calling the kettle black?’
      • ‘To work within the constraints of an international system is a very frustrating experience, but criticisms about its shortcomings are often a case of the pot calling the kettle black.’
      • ‘I know it's like the pot calling the kettle black, but in fairness, when you are a smoker, you do not realise the discomfort you put other people through by smoking in public and polluting their air with your smoke.’
      • ‘At this point I was sitting in my chair thinking, man, this guy's really the pot calling the kettle black, isn't he?’
      • ‘Yes, I realise this is a prime example of the pot calling the kettle black.’
      • ‘Well now, isn't this a fine case of the pot calling the kettle black?’
      • ‘All said and done, is this a case of the pot calling the kettle black?’
      • ‘But it was a classic case of the pot calling the kettle black.’
      • ‘That's a case of the pot calling the kettle black - if you want to hear about bratty kids talk about yourselves.’
      • ‘To be fair, my own criticism is an example of the pot calling the kettle black.’
  • shit (or piss) or get off the pot

    • vulgar slang Used to convey that someone should stop wasting time and get on with something.

Origin

Late Old English pott, probably reinforced in Middle English by Old French pot; of unknown ultimate origin (compare with late Latin potus ‘drinking cup’). Current senses of the verb date from the early 17th century.

Pronunciation

pot

/pɑt//pät/

Main definitions of pot in English

: pot1pot2pot3pot4

pot2

noun

  • 1A shot aimed at someone or something; a potshot.

    ‘my friends had a pot at the occasional rabbit’
    • ‘That's all fine and good, but to a group of yahoos serpentining around a grassy knoll taking pots at each other, it maybe seems like too much, you know?’
  • 2(chiefly in rugby) an attempt to score a goal with a kick.

    • ‘County were first to score, their opening pressure forcing a penalty for offside to allow their full-back the easiest of pots at goal for three points.’
    • ‘He kicked a penalty to the corner rather than have a pot at goal.’
    • ‘Twice he declined a pot at goal and opted to kick to the corner despite defending a narrow three-point lead.’
    • ‘He set up Morgan for a pot at goal and a hard shot beat Kellett.’
    • ‘Keighley were denied the opportunity to attack and a long distance pot at goal by Harrison from a penalty award was their only realistic chance to snatch victory.’
    • ‘Eventually Kendal earned a pot at goal for a ruck offence and Scott put over the 24-metre kick to cut the gap to four points.’
    • ‘Adamson failed to convert and the full-back ended up missing five of his six pots at goal.’
    • ‘When he was impeded just outside the penalty area, the big defender grabbed the ball and prepared himself for a pot at goal.’
    • ‘Rangers had only three other pots at goal, and the Georgian striker was responsible for two of them.’
    • ‘He provided the room for Murray to have a pot for goal from close range, the centre forward's shot unluckily hammering off the crossbar and going safe.’
    • ‘Numerous times Hunter missed pots which would have set him up.’
    • ‘Wicklow hit a purple patch on the restart to tack on five points in nine minutes without reply and without missing a pot at goal.’

Main definitions of pot in English

: pot1pot2pot3pot4

pot3

noun

informal
  • Cannabis.

    • ‘Forty-five per cent of Canadians have smoked pot at least once and males are more likely to toke up than females.’
    • ‘You really can't have an intelligent discussion about drugs if you're going to lump pot in with cocaine, and ecstasy in with heroin.’
    • ‘Comparing pot to heroin or to LSD or to pretty much any drug is like comparing an apple to a cloud.’
    • ‘When are we going to catch up with other countries and realise that smoking a bit of pot is not going to turn us all into cocaine addicts.’
    • ‘When I was pregnant he didn't calm down, I hardly saw him as he was always out with his friends smoking pot.’
    • ‘In Vietnam soldiers took heroin and smoked copious quantities of pot and hash.’
    • ‘This was a big problem, I was smoking pot before work, at work and at night.’
    • ‘Banning parties and blockading raves will not stop a movement, nor will it stop the use of ecstasy, cocaine, speed, heroin and pot for that matter.’
    • ‘He asked me if I took any drugs and I honestly answered that I smoked a fair bit of pot and also smoked cigarettes.’
    • ‘I mean its one thing to smoke cigarettes and whole other thing to smoke pot, or use crack or LSD.’
    • ‘A night smoking pot will cost you far less than a night on the beer.’
    • ‘Mother says that just because they smoke pot doesn't mean that they're stoners.’
    • ‘The model here is the Dutch program of allowing users to smoke pot in licensed cannabis shops.’
    • ‘So if it's legal to go out, drink 23 pints and get into a state and a half, why not be allowed to smoke pot?’
    • ‘In an atmosphere of ecstasy, pot smoking and cocaine line drug taking the evening gets out of hand.’
    • ‘Almost four of every 10 teens aged 18 or 19 reported having smoked pot or hash in the previous year.’
    • ‘Thirteen years of increased marijuana arrests actually correspond to increased pot smoking by kids.’
    • ‘The legalising campaign also points to the fact that smoking is legal, and that pot is in no way more unhealthy than smoking.’
    • ‘I also know that at least five of my fellow officers smoke pot and arrest people the next day for supplying it.’
    • ‘As no pot was smoked in public, all charges are summarily dismissed without prejudice.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Score (a goal)

    ‘the English Lion potted two penalties of his own’
    • ‘Amos had two tries and a penalty, Gill went over for a try and Laidlaw potted a drop goal.’
    • ‘He went the full length for Leigh's first try and Turley potted a field goal to give the dominant Centurions a flying start.’
    • ‘Rowley potted a field goal to regain the lead before Martyn popped a sensational pass to Cooper who raced away for his second of the game.’
    • ‘The penalty was perfectly potted but Bayer still had their precious away goal, and were soon to get another.’
    • ‘He potted the loan Warrior goal, breaking York's shutout in the third period.’
    • ‘The Bruins won the first two games of the series in overtime on goals by the winger who potted just 10 regular-season goals.’
    • ‘Hadcroft touched down wide out and the new sub also powered across with his team-mate potting a long range field goal for good measure to put them 31-8 up.’
    • ‘Trotman, a leader for the Clan all season, potted the championship winning goal.’
    • ‘Steven added four penalties and Warren potted a drop-goal in a game which was in the balance right to the final whistle.’
    • ‘If Australia wanted to play that kind of game, the ARU could easily poach themselves an AFL player and train him up to pot long range field goals all day.’
    • ‘In his first game of the season November 22, he potted four goals in an 8-4 win over East St. Paul.’
    • ‘He could be a future 50-goal scorer, after potting 67 in his first two seasons.’
    • ‘Lenzie led 18-0 at half-time with tries, a conversion and Yorston potting two penalties.’

Origin

1930s: probably from Mexican Spanish potiguaya ‘cannabis leaves’.

Pronunciation

pot

/pɑt//pät/

Main definitions of pot in English

: pot1pot2pot3pot4

pot4

noun

Pronunciation

pot

/pɑt//pät/