Definition of postal in US English:

postal

adjective

  • 1attributive Relating to the post office or the mail.

    ‘postal services’
    ‘increased postal rates’
    • ‘He has also raised the issue of whether it is feasible to use postal codes to help improve the postal services around the country.’
    • ‘Post offices serve many functions apart from postal services and many elderly people cannot travel a great distance to reach one.’
    • ‘If you suspect that this has happened to you, you must notify your area's postal inspector.’
    • ‘May I add my protest regarding the new postal system.’
    • ‘I don't know if postal services were to blame, but I trust you had a good field.’
    • ‘Anyone out there who would like one, just send me a postal address.’
    • ‘Please contact me with your postal addresses, and I'll do the rest.’
    • ‘The commission does not have the power to actually set postal rates.’
    • ‘However, I am convinced that the best interests of the town as a whole would be served by the post office returning to a facility dedicated to postal services.’
    • ‘There is no exemption of postal goods and services mentioned anywhere in the Fair Tax Act of 2005.’
    • ‘The list bans foreign investments in sectors such as postal savings, free-to-air television broadcasting and auto passenger transportation businesses.’
    • ‘The fact that this garbage beggars up everybody's postal service for weeks to come is but the physical consequence of this fraud.’
    • ‘Enquiries revealed that postal orders to a value of £124,000 had been cashed at a local post office.’
    • ‘Unlike with postal junk mail, spam places most of the cost burden on recipients and the larger infrastructure.’
    • ‘Dodgy postal addresses can be another good clue that a fiddle is in progress.’
    • ‘This is a postal service, where there are people on hand to sign off on any package that needs a signature.’
    • ‘The US postal service and some public safety officials signed contracts for the devices.’
    • ‘Each new postal delivery brings more impassioned pleas to protect the local post office.’
    • ‘Telephones, electricity, and postal services served only one percent of the population.’
    • ‘The change also means nearly all residents have received new postal codes.’
    mad, crazy, insane, out of one's mind, hysterical, beside oneself, frenzied, crazed, demented, maniacal, manic, frantic, wound up, worked up, raving, wild
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1British Done through the mail.
      ‘a postal ballot’
      ‘a postal survey’
      • ‘We are fully intending to hold an inquiry here in Stockport over the problems we have encountered with postal ballots.’
      • ‘Mixed feelings swell up inside me when I consider the issue of postal ballots in the local elections this year.’
      • ‘A higher than usual number of postal voters in this election in Scotland did not receive their postal ballots.’
      • ‘He said local bigwigs had come into Asian homes, pressuring voters to cast their postal ballots in front of them - insisting they back Labour.’
      • ‘Yorkshire members can vote on the resolution either by postal ballot or in person at the annual meeting at Headingley.’
      • ‘It was claimed that voters had been threatened and intimidated into giving away their postal ballot papers.’
      • ‘A York document services company was today celebrating its key role in this year's biggest municipal postal ballots in England and Wales.’
      • ‘The reason was clear: although many voters had requested postal ballots, they had decided not to use them.’
      • ‘Supporters of some candidates, it is alleged, are demanding householders hand over the postal ballot papers so they can fill them in themselves.’
      • ‘According to one estimate, there could be 20 times as may postal ballots as in 1997.’
      • ‘Printers have won the race to publish all the 14m postal ballot papers for the north west and three other regions, the government said today.’
      • ‘I have not yet received my ballot papers for postal voting - something that has been foisted on millions of us without it being thought through.’
      • ‘Once the petition has been submitted, Bradford Council will consult local people by postal ballot.’
      • ‘It urged candidates and canvassers to avoid handling or helping voters complete their postal ballot papers.’
      • ‘The Government has, however, always insisted the two polls were postponed because of concerns over postal ballot fraud allegations.’
      • ‘The Government has brushed aside opponents' fears postal ballots will lead to vote-rigging.’
      • ‘A number added they were not aware of any problems, and not everyone who wanted a postal ballot got one and not all who did used theirs.’
      • ‘They have applied to the government to ditch the traditional polling booth in favour of a pilot to send out 165,000 eligible voters a postal ballot.’
      • ‘His appointment will go to a formal postal ballot later this month.’
      • ‘The postal ballot system proved successful with a 42 per cent turnout compared to 32 per cent last year.’

noun

US
informal
  • another term for postcard
    • ‘These postal cards are working models and make an attractive alternative to conventional greetings card’
    • ‘Will and Nellie wrote postals (post cards) and letters to each other almost every day.’
    • ‘In the area of postal cards, this is one of my favorites, since many of the same types of production anomalies can be found here as well.’

Phrases

  • go postal

    • informal Become crazed and violent, especially as the result of stress.

      • ‘Against the odds, you will find the self-restraint and strength of character to restrain yourself from going postal at annoying chattery colleagues.’
      • ‘However, instead of going postal and risk the chance you may do something you'll regret later, take his/her picture and throw darts at it.’
      • ‘The talk was that someone went postal at the docks.’
      • ‘You're not the only one who's lost out before, but you don't see me going postal on a hospital room!’
      • ‘This was not some guy from the Midwest who'd gone postal on his co-workers.’
      • ‘I survived about thirty-five years of it myself without calling in sick or making colossal mistakes or going postal whenever it was that time of the month.’
      • ‘I guess there's no use in screaming for help since I doubt our friends have gone postal and are out to kill us.’
      • ‘I ask one question about her to my father and he goes postal on me.’
      • ‘I ran the department that particular festive season, and I felt like going postal pretty much every day in the stretch before Christmas, believe me.’
      • ‘It was intentional, a case of someone going postal.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from French, from poste ‘postal service’.

Pronunciation

postal

/ˈpoʊstəl//ˈpōstəl/